Commercial cooking installations
Download
1 / 55

Commercial Cooking Installations - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 412 Views
  • Updated On :

Commercial Cooking Installations. MBOA October 28, 2008 Brad Loewen, P.Eng., CRSP. Outline. Introduction Application of NFPA 96 MBC, MFC, NFPA 96 Installation Requirements NFPA CSA “Gas Code” Operation Requirements Maintenance Requirements. MBC 3.3.1.2.(2).

Related searches for Commercial Cooking Installations

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Commercial Cooking Installations' - ryanadan


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Commercial cooking installations l.jpg

Commercial Cooking Installations

MBOA

October 28, 2008

Brad Loewen, P.Eng., CRSP


Outline l.jpg
Outline

  • Introduction

  • Application of NFPA 96

    • MBC, MFC, NFPA 96

  • Installation Requirements

    • NFPA

    • CSA “Gas Code”

  • Operation Requirements

  • Maintenance Requirements


Mbc 3 3 1 2 2 l.jpg
MBC 3.3.1.2.(2)

  • Cooking equipment, not within a dwelling unit, used in processes producing grease-laden vapours shall be designed and installed in conformance with Part 6. (See Appendix A.)


Mbc a 3 3 1 2 2 l.jpg
MBC A-3.3.1.2.(2)

Cooking equipment manufactured for use in dwelling units and other residential suites is often installed in buildings used for assembly and care or detention purposes. It is not obvious from the Code requirements or those of NFPA 96, “Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations,” whether a ventilation and grease removal system is required in all assembly and care or detention uses. If the equipment is to be used in a manner that will produce grease-laden vapours that are substantially more than would be produced in a normal household environment, then it would be appropriate to apply the requirements of NFPA 96. If the equipment is used primarily for reheating food prepared elsewhere or is used occasionally for demonstration or educational purposes, there would be no expectation of applying the requirements of NFPA 96. In all cases the circumstances should be reviewed with the authority having jurisdiction


Mbc 9 10 1 3 l.jpg
MBC 9.10.1.3

  • In kitchens containing commercial cooking equipment used in processes producing grease-laden vapours, the equipment shall be designed and installed in conformance with Article 6.2.2.6 (See Appendix A.)


Mbc a 9 10 1 3 1 l.jpg
MBC A-9.10.1.3.(1)

  • Part 6 refers to NFPA 96, “Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations,” which in turn references “Commercial Cooking Equipment.” However, the deciding factor as to whether or not NFPA 96 applies is the potential for production of grease-laden vapours and smoke, rather than the type of equipment used. While NFPA 96 does not apply to domestic equipment for normal residential family use, it should apply to domestic equipment used in commercial, industrial, institutional and similar cooking applications where the potential for the production of smoke and grease-laden vapours exceeds that for normal residential family use.


Mfc 2 6 1 9 l.jpg
MFC 2.6.1.9

  • 2.6.1.9.Commercial Cooking Equipment

    1)Commercial cooking equipment exhaust and fire protection systems shall be designed and installed in conformance with the NBC.


Mbc 6 2 2 6 l.jpg
MBC 6.2.2.6

  • 6.2.2.6.Commercial Cooking Equipment

  • 1)Systems for the ventilation of commercial cooking equipment shall be designed, constructed and installed to conform to NFPA 96, “Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations,” except as required by Sentence 3.6.3.1.(1) (vertical service space separation) and Article 3.6.4.2. (horizontal service space separation)

  • 2)Fire protection systems for commercial cooking equipment referred to in Sentence (1) using vegetable oil or animal fat shall conform to

    a) ANSI/UL 300, “Fire Testing of Fire Extinguishing Systems for Protection of Commercial Cooking Equipment,” or

    b) ULC/ORD-C1254.6, “Fire Testing of Restaurant Cooking Area Fire Extinguishing System Units.”


Mbc definitions l.jpg
MBC Definitions

  • Horizontal service space means a space such as an attic, duct, ceiling, roof or crawl space oriented essentially in a horizontal plane, concealed and generally inaccessible, through which building service facilities such as pipes, ducts and wiring may pass.

  • Vertical service space means a shaft oriented essentially vertically that is provided in a building to facilitate the installation of building services including mechanical, electrical and plumbing installations and facilities such as elevators, refuse chutes and linen chutes.


Function statements l.jpg
Function Statements

  • F01 - To minimize the risk of accidental ignition.

  • F02 - To limit the severity and effects of fire or explosions.

  • F44 - To limit the spread of hazardous substances beyond their point of release.


Intent l.jpg
INTENT

  • To limit the probability that inappropriate design, construction or installation will lead to performance that is significantly below expectations, which could lead to:

  • the accumulation of vapours or residues in hazardous concentrations or quantities which could be ignited in the presence of an ignition source,

  • the ignition of nearby combustible materials as a result of the use and operation of cooking equipment and its ventilation system, or

  • the spread of fire involving cooking equipment or its ventilating system.

  • This is to limit the probability of fire or explosion, which could lead to harm to persons.


Nfpa 96 2008 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

  • 1.1 Scope. 

  • 1.1.1*  This standard shall provide the minimum fire safety requirements (preventative and operative) related to the design, installation, operation, inspection, and maintenance of all public and private cooking operations.  

  • 1.1.2 This standard shall apply to residential cooking equipment used for commercial cooking operations.  

  • 1.1.3 This standard shall not apply to cooking equipment located in a single dwelling unit.  


Nfpa 96 200813 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

  • A.1.1.1 These requirements include, but are not limited to, all manner of cooking equipment, exhaust hoods, grease removal devices, exhaust ductwork, exhaust fans, dampers, fire-extinguishing equipment, and all other auxiliary or ancillary components or systems that are involved in the capture, containment, and control of grease-laden cooking effluent.


Nfpa 96 200814 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

  • 1.1.4*  This standard shall not apply to facilities where all of the following are met:    

  • (1)      Only residential equipment is being used. 

  • (2)      Fire extinguishers are located in all kitchen areas in accordance with NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers. 

  • (3)      Facility is not an assembly occupancy. 

  • (4)      The authority having jurisdiction has approved the installation.


Nfpa 96 200815 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

  • A.1.1.4 This judgment should take into account the type of cooking being performed, items being cooked, and the frequency of cooking operations. Examples of operations that might not require compliance with this standard include the following:                            

  • (1)      Day care centers warming bottles and lunches 

  • (2)      Therapy cooking facilities in health care 

  • (3)      Churches and meeting operations that are not cooking meals that produce grease-laden vapors  

  • (4)      Employee break rooms where food is warmed


Nfpa 96 name change l.jpg
NFPA 96 Name Change

  • In the 1994 edition, the Committee changed the name of the standard from “Standard for the Installation of Equipment for the Removal of Smoke and Grease-Laden Vapors from Commercial Cooking Equipment” to “Standard for Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations”.  


Nfpa 96 200817 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

  • 1.2 Purpose. 

  • The purpose of this standard shall be to reduce the potential fire hazard of cooking operations, irrespective of the type of cooking equipment used and whether used in public or private facilities.


Nfpa 96 200818 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

  • 1.3 Application. 

  • 1.3.1*  This standard shall be applied as a united whole.

  • A.1.3.1 This standard cannot provide safe design and operation if parts of it are not enforced or are arbitrarily deleted in any application.


Nfpa 96 200820 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

  • 4.1 General. 

  • 4.1.1 Cooking equipment used in processes producing smoke or grease-laden vapors shall be equipped with an exhaust system that complies with all the equipment and performance requirements of this standard.


Nfpa 96 200821 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

  • 4.2* Clearance. 

  • 4.2.1 Where enclosures are not required, hoods, grease removal devices, exhaust fans, and ducts shall have a clearance of at least 457 mm (18 in.) to combustible material, 76 mm (3 in.) to limited-combustible material, and 0 mm (0 in.) to noncombustible material. (Vert. and Horiz Services spaces are enclosures)


Nfpa 96 l.jpg
NFPA 96

  • 4.5 Duct Clearances to Enclosures. 

  • Clearances between the duct and interior surfaces of enclosures shall meet the requirements of Section 4.2.


Nfpa 96 200823 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

  • 3.3.36.1 Combustible Material. Any material that will burn regardless of its autoignition temperature.

  • 3.3.36.2 Limited-Combustible Material. Refers to a building construction material not complying with the definition of noncombustible material that, in the form in which it is used, has a potential heat value not exceeding 8141 kJ/kg (3500 Btu/lb), where tested in accordance with NFPA 259 and includes (1) materials having a structural base of noncombustible material, with a surfacing not exceeding a thickness of in. (3.2 mm) that has a flame spread index not greater than 50; and (2) materials, in the form and thickness used, other than as described in (1), having neither a flame spread index greater than 25 nor evidence of continued progressive combustion, and of such composition that surfaces that would be exposed by cutting through the material on any plane would have neither a flame spread index greater than 25 nor evidence of continued progressive combustion. [5000, 2006]

  • 3.3.36.3*Noncombustible Material. A substance that will not ignite and burn when subjected to a fire.


Potential heat weight basis btu lb l.jpg
Potential Heat, Weight Basis (Btu/lb)

  • Gypsum board 760 

  • Gypsum board with paper removed –270 

  • Gypsum board + alkyd gloss paint 880 

  • Linoleum tile  86.0 

  • Douglas fir, untreated 8,400

  • Maple soft, untreated  7,940 


Nfpa 96 200827 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

  • Chapter 5 Hoods 

  • 5.1 Construction. 

  • 5.1.1 The hood or that portion of a primary collection means designed for collecting cooking vapors and residues shall be constructed of and be supported by steel not less than 1.09 mm (0.043 in.) (No. 18 MSG) in thickness, stainless steel not less than 0.94 mm (0.037 in.) (No. 20 MSG) in thickness, or other approved material of equivalent strength and fire and corrosion resistance.  

  • 5.1.2 All seams, joints, and penetrations of the hood enclosure that direct and capture grease-laden vapors and exhaust gases shall have a liquidtight continuous external weld to the hood’s lower outermost perimeter.  

  • 5.1.3 Seams, joints, and penetrations of the hood shall be permitted to be internally welded, provided that the weld is formed smooth or ground smooth, so as to not trap grease, and is cleanable.  


Nfpa 96 200828 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

  • 6.1 Grease Removal Devices. 

  • 6.1.1 Listed grease filters, listed baffles, or other listed grease removal devices for use with commercial cooking equipment shall be provided.  

  • 6.1.2 Listed grease filters shall be tested in accordance with UL 1046.  

  • 6.1.3 Mesh filters shall not be used.  


Nfpa 96 200829 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

  • 6.2.1 Separation Distance.

  • 6.2.1.1 The distance between the grease removal device and the cooking surface shall be as great as possible but not less than 457 mm (18 in.).


Nfpa 96 200830 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

  • 6.2.3 Grease Filters.

  • 6.2.3.1 Grease filters shall be listed and constructed of steel or listed equivalent material.  

  • 6.2.3.2 Grease filters shall be of rigid construction that will not distort or crush under normal operation, handling, and cleaning conditions.  

  • 6.2.3.3 Grease filters shall be arranged so that all exhaust air passes through the grease filters.  

  • 6.2.3.4 Grease filters shall be easily accessible and removable for cleaning.  

  • 6.2.3.5 Grease filters shall be installed at an angle not less than 45 degrees from the horizontal.  

  • 6.2.4 Grease Drip Trays.

  • 6.2.4.1 Grease filters shall be equipped with a grease drip tray beneath their lower edges.  

  • 6.2.4.2 Grease drip trays shall be kept to the minimum size needed to collect grease.  

  • 6.2.4.3 Grease drip trays shall be pitched to drain into an enclosed metal container having a capacity not exceeding 3.8 L (1 gal).  


Fire protection systems nfpa 96 l.jpg
Fire Protection SystemsNFPA 96

  • 10.1.1 Fire-extinguishing equipment for the protection of grease removal devices, hood exhaust plenums, and exhaust duct systems shall be provided.  

  • 10.1.2*  Cooking equipment that produces grease-laden vapors and that might be a source of ignition of grease in the hood, grease removal device, or duct shall be protected by fire-extinguishing equipment.

  • A.10.1.2 Examples of cooking equipment that produce grease-laden vapors include, but are not limited to, appliances such as deep-fat fryers, ranges, griddles, broilers, woks, tilting skillets, and braising pans.


Nfpa 96 fire protection con t l.jpg
NFPA 96FIRE PROTECTION CON’T.

  • 10.2 Types of Equipment. 

  • 10.2.1 Fire-extinguishing equipment shall include both automatic fire-extinguishing systems as primary protection and portable fire extinguishers as secondary backup.  

  • 10.2.2 A placard identifying the use of the extinguisher as secondary backup to the automatic fire-extinguishing system shall be conspicuously placed near each portable fire extinguisher intended to be used for protection in the cooking area. 

  • 10.2.2.1 The language and wording for the placard shall be approved by the authority having jurisdiction. 

  • 10.2.3*  Automatic fire-extinguishing systems shall comply with UL 300 or other equivalent standards and shall be installed in accordance with the requirements of the listing.  

  • 10.2.3.1 In existing systems, when changes in the cooking media, positioning, or replacement of cooking equipment occur, the fire-extinguishing system shall be made to comply with 10.2.3. 

  • 10.2.4 Grease removal devices, hood exhaust plenums, exhaust ducts, and cooking equipment that are not addressed in UL 300 or other equivalent test standards shall be protected with an automatic fire-extinguishing system(s) in accordance with the applicable NFPA standard(s) and all local building and fire codes and shall be approved by the authority having jurisdiction.  

  • 10.2.5 Automatic fire-extinguishing equipment provided as part of listed recirculating systems shall comply with UL 710B. 

  • 10.2.6 Automatic fire-extinguishing systems shall be installed in accordance with the terms of their listing, the manufacturer’s instructions, and the following standards where applicable:                                                             

  • (1)      NFPA 12

  • (2)      NFPA 13

  • (3)      NFPA 17

  • (4)      NFPA 17A


Ul 300 l.jpg
UL 300

Fire Testing of Fire Extinguishing Systems for Protection of Commercial Cooking Equipment

Scope

  • 1.1 These requirements cover the performance during fire tests of pre-engineered fire extinguishing system units intended for the protection of commercial cooking equipment for restaurants, cafeterias and other similar venues. For installation requirements, see the following documents: NFPA 17, Standard for Dry Chemical Extinguishing Systems; NFPA 96, Standard for Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations; and NFPA 17A, Standard for Wet Chemical Extinguishing Systems. Note that local authorities having jurisdiction should be consulted prior to installation.


Nfpa 13 l.jpg
NFPA 13

  • 7.10 Commercial-Type Cooking Equipment and Ventilation. 

  • 7.10.1 General. In cooking areas protected by automatic sprinklers, additional sprinklers or automatic spray nozzles shall be provided to protect commercial-type cooking equipment and ventilation systems that are designed to carry away grease-laden vapors unless otherwise protected. 

  • 7.10.2*Sprinklers and Automatic Spray Nozzles.

  • 7.10.2.1 Unless the requirements of 7.10.2.2 are met, standard sprinklers or automatic spray nozzles shall be so located as to provide for the protection of exhaust ducts, hood exhaust duct collars, and hood exhaust plenum chambers. 

  • 7.10.2.2 Sprinklers or automatic spray nozzles in ducts, duct collars, and plenum chambers shall not be required where all cooking equipment is served by listed grease extractors. 

  • 7.10.2.3 Unless the requirements of 7.10.2.5 are met, standard sprinklers or automatic spray nozzles shall be so located as to provide for the protection of cooking equipment and cooking surfaces. 

  • 7.10.2.4 Hoods containing automatic fire-extinguishing systems are protected areas; therefore, these hoods are not considered obstructions to overhead sprinkler systems and shall not require floor coverage underneath. 

  • 7.10.2.5 Cooking equipment below hoods that contain automatic fire-extinguishing equipment is protected and shall not require protection from the overhead sprinkler system. 

  • 7.10.3 Sprinkler and Automatic Spray Nozzle Location — Ducts.

  • 7.10.3.1 Unless the requirements of 7.10.3.2 or 7.10.3.4 are met, exhaust ducts shall have one sprinkler or automatic spray nozzle located at the top of each vertical riser and at the midpoint of each offset. 

  • 7.10.3.2 Sprinklers or automatic spray nozzles shall not be required in a vertical riser located outside of a building, provided the riser does not expose combustible material or provided the interior of the building and the horizontal distance between the hood outlet and the vertical riser is at least 25 ft (7.6 m). 

  • 7.10.3.3 Unless the requirements of 7.10.3.4 are met, horizontal exhaust ducts shall have sprinklers or automatic spray nozzle devices located on 10 ft (3 m) centers beginning no more than 5 ft (1.5 m) from the duct entrance. 

  • 7.10.3.4 Sprinklers or automatic spray nozzles shall be required in ducts.       

  • 7.10.3.4.1 Where ducts do not exceed 75 ft (22.86 m) in length and the entire exhaust duct is protected in accordance with UL 300, Standard for Safety Fire Testing of Fire Extinguishing Systems for Protection of Restaurant Cooking Areas, sprinkler(s) [or automatic spray nozzle(s)] shall not be required. 

  • 7.10.7 Sprinkler and Automatic Spray Nozzle. Access shall be provided to all sprinklers or automatic spray nozzles for examination and replacement. 

  • 7.10.8 Cooking Equipment.

  • 7.10.8.1 General. Cooking equipment (such as deep fat fryers, ranges, griddles, and broilers) that is considered to be a source of ignition shall be protected in accordance with the provisions of 7.10.1. 

  • 7.10.8.2 Deep Fat Fryers.

  • 7.10.8.2.1 A sprinkler or automatic spray nozzle used for protection of deep fat fryers shall be listed for that application. 

  • 7.10.8.2.2 The position, arrangement, location, and water supply for each sprinkler or automatic spray nozzle shall be in accordance with its listing. 

  • 7.10.8.3 Fuel and Heat Shutoff.

  • 7.10.8.3.1 The operation of any cooking equipment sprinkler or automatic spray nozzle shall automatically shut off all sources of fuel and heat to all equipment requiring protection. 

  • 7.10.8.3.2 Any gas appliance not requiring protection but located under ventilating equipment shall also be shut off. 

  • 7.10.8.3.3 All shutdown devices shall be of the type that requires manual resetting prior to fuel or power being restored. 

  • 7.10.9 Indicating Valves. A listed indicating valve shall be installed in the water supply line to the sprinklers and spray nozzles protecting the cooking and ventilating system. 

  • 7.10.12 Sprinkler and Automatic Spray Nozzle Replacement.

  • 7.10.12.1 Unless the requirements of 7.10.12.2 are met, sprinklers and automatic spray nozzles used for protecting commercial-type cooking equipment and ventilating systems shall be replaced annually. 

  • 7.10.12.2 Where automatic bulb-type sprinklers or spray nozzles are used and annual examination shows no buildup of grease or other material on the sprinklers or spray nozzles, such sprinklers or spray nozzles shall be permitted to be continued in use. 


Nfpa 17 l.jpg
NFPA 17

  • 9.3 Commercial Kitchen Hood, Duct, and Cooking Appliance Systems.  

  • 9.3.1 Each protected cooking appliance(s), individual hood(s), and branch exhaust duct(s) directly connected to the hood shall be protected by a single system or by systems designed for simultaneous operation. 

  • 9.3.1.1 At least one fusible link or heat detector shall be installed within each exhaust duct opening in accordance with the manufacturer’s listing. 

  • 9.3.1.2 A fusible link or heat detector shall be provided above each protected cooking appliance and in accordance with the extinguishing system manufacturer’s listing. 

  • 9.3.1.3 Fusible links or heat detectors located at or within 12 in. (305 mm) into the exhaust duct opening and above the protected appliance shall be permitted to meet the requirements of 9.3.1.2. 

  • 9.3.2 Fire-extinguishing systems referenced in 9.3.1 shall comply with ANSI/UL 300, Fire Testing of Fire Extinguishing Systems for Protection of Commercial Cooking Equipment, or equivalent listing standard. 

  • 9.3.2.1 Fixed automatic dry chemical extinguishing systems shall be installed in accordance with the terms of the listing, the manufacturer’s instructions, and this standard. 

  • 9.3.3 Systems protecting two or more hoods or plenums, or both, that meet the requirements of Section 5.2 shall be installed to ensure the simultaneous operation of all systems protecting the hoods, plenums, or both, and associated cooking appliances located below the hoods. 

  • 9.3.4* Protection of Common Exhaust Duct.

  • 9.3.4.1 Common exhaust ducts shall be protected by one of the following methods:   

  • (1)*Simultaneous operation of all independent hood, duct, and appliance protection systems 

  • (2)*Simultaneous operation of any hood, duct, and appliance protection system and the system(s) protecting the entire common exhaust duct 

  • 9.3.4.1.1 A fusible link or other mechanically operated heat detection device from the common duct fire extinguishing system shall be located at each branch duct–to–common duct connection when electrical operation of the common duct fire extinguishing system does not meet the requirements of 9.6.1. 

  • 9.3.4.1.2 Where a fusible link or mechanically operated heat detector is located at a branch duct–to–common duct connection, an access panel shall be installed in accordance with NFPA 96, Standard for Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations, to enable servicing of the detector when the detector is not accessible from the branch duct connection to the exhaust hood. 

  • 9.3.4.2 All sources of fuel or heat to appliances served by the common exhaust duct shall be shut down upon actuation of any protection system in accordance with 9.3.5. 

  • 9.3.4.3 The building owner(s) shall be responsible for the protection of a common exhaust duct(s) used by more than one tenant. 

  • 9.3.4.3.1 The tenant shall be responsible for the protection of a common exhaust duct(s) serving hoods located within the tenant’s space and up to the point of connection to the building owner’s common exhaust duct. 

  • 9.3.4.3.2 The tenant’s common duct shall be considered a branch duct to the building owner’s common duct. 

  • 9.3.5* Shutoff Devices. Upon actuation of any cooking equipment fire-extinguishing system, all sources of fuel and electric power that produce heat to all equipment protected by the system shall be shut down. 

  • 9.3.5.1 Steam supplied from an external source shall not require shutdown. 

  • 9.3.5.2*Exhaust fans and dampers shall not be required to be shut down upon system actuation. 

  • 9.3.5.3 Any gas appliance not requiring protection but located under the same ventilating equipment shall be automatically shut off upon actuation of any extinguishing system. 

  • 9.3.5.4 Shutoff devices shall require manual resetting prior to fuel or power being restored. 

  • 9.4 Manual Actuation Requirements. 

  • 9.4.1 Such mechanical means shall not rely on any of the hardware components that would be common to the automatic function of the fixed fire-extinguishing equipment. 

  • 9.4.2 The means for manual actuator(s) actuation shall be mechanical and shall not rely on electrical power for actuation. 

  • 9.4.3 Electrical power shall be permitted to be used for manual actuation if a reserve power supply is provided in accordance with Section 9.6. 

  • 9.4.4 The manual actuation means of an automatic extinguishing system shall be totally independent of the automatic means. 

  • 9.4.5 A failure of a system component shall not impair both the automatic and manual means of actuation. 

  • 9.5 System Annunciation Requirements. 

  • 9.5.1 Upon actuation of a fixed automatic fire-extinguishing system, an audible alarm or visual indicator shall be provided to show that the system has been actuated. 

  • 9.5.2 Where a fire alarm signaling system is serving the occupancy where the extinguishing system is located, the actuation of the fixed automatic fire-extinguishing system shall actuate the fire alarm signaling system.


Nfpa 17a l.jpg
NFPA 17A

  • 5.1 General. 

  • 5.1.1 Wet chemical fire-extinguishing systems shall comply with ANSI/UL 300. 

  • 5.1.2 Use. Hazards and equipment that can be protected using wet chemical extinguishing systems shall include the following:   

  • (1)      Restaurant, commercial, and institutional hoods 

  • (2)      Plenums, ducts, and filters with their associated cooking appliances 

  • (3)      Special grease removal devices 

  • (4)      Odor control devices 

  • (5)      Energy recovery devices installed in the exhaust system 

  • 5.1.3 Applications. The manufacturer’s listed installation and maintenance manual shall be consulted for system limitations and applications for which wet chemical extinguishing systems are considered satisfactory protection. 

  • 5.1.4 Each protected cooking appliance, individual hood, and branch exhaust duct directly connected to the hood shall be protected by a system or systems designed for simultaneous operation. 

  • 5.1.5 Where two or more hazards can be simultaneously involved in fire by reason of their proximity, the hazards shall be protected by either of the following:   

  • (1)      Individual systems installed on each hazard to operate simultaneously 

  • (2)      A single system designed to protect all hazards that can be simultaneously involved 

  • 5.1.5.1 Any hazard that will allow fire propagation from one area to another shall constitute a single fire hazard. 

  • 5.2 System Actuation. 

  • 5.2.1 All systems shall have both automatic and manual methods of actuation. 

  • 5.2.1.1 The automatic and manual means of system actuation, external to the control head or releasing device, shall be separate and independent of each other so that a failure of one will not impair the operation of the other. 

  • 5.2.1.2 When a listed releasing mechanism is used employing a single line for mechanical detection and remote manual control, the remote manual control shall be installed inline, prior to all detection devices, so malfunction of one does not impede operation of the other. 

  • 5.2.1.3 Automatic detection and system actuation shall be in accordance with the manufacturer’s listed installation and maintenance manual. 

  • 5.2.1.4 All devices necessary for proper operation of the system shall function simultaneously with the system operation. 

  • 5.2.1.5 Operation of any manual actuator shall be all that is required to bring about the full operation of the system. 

  • 5.2.1.6 At least one manual actuator shall be provided for each system. 

  • 5.2.1.7 All operating devices shall be designed, located, installed, or protected so that they are not subject to mechanical, environmental, or other conditions that could render them inoperative or cause inadvertent operation of the system. 

  • 5.2.1.8 An audible or visual indicator shall be provided to show that the system has operated, that personnel response is needed, and that the system is in need of recharge. 

  • 5.2.1.9 The extinguishing system shall be connected to the fire alarm system, if provided, in accordance with the requirements of NFPA 72, so that the actuation of the extinguishing system will sound the fire alarm as well as provide the function of the extinguishing system. 

  • 5.2.1.10*A readily accessible means for manual actuation shall be located in a path of egress. When manual actuation is used for cooking-related protection, the manual actuation device shall be installed no more than 48 in. (1200 mm), and no less than 42 in. (1067 mm), above the floor and shall clearly identify the hazard protected. 

  • 5.2.1.11 Automatic systems protecting common exhaust ducts only shall not require a remote manual actuator. 

  • 5.2.1.12 The means for mechanical actuator(s) shall be mechanical and shall not rely on electrical power for actuation. 

  • 5.2.1.13 Electrical power shall be permitted to be used for manual actuation if a reserve power supply is provided or if supervision is provided as per Section 5.3. 

  • 5.3 Supervision. 

  • 5.3.1 Where electrical power is required to operate the fixed automatic fire-extinguishing system, the system shall be monitored by a supervisory alarm with a reserve power supply provided. 

  • 5.3.1.1 Where supervision of any or all of the following is provided, it shall be designed to give an indication of trouble in the following:   

  • (1)      Automatic detection system 

  • (2)      Electrical actuation circuit 

  • (3)      Electrical power supply 

  • 5.3.1.2 Signals indicating the failure of supervised devices or equipment shall give prompt and positive indication of any failure and shall be distinct from signals indicating operation or hazardous conditions. 

  • 5.3.2 Where fixed automatic fire-extinguishing systems include automatic mechanical detection and actuation as a backup detection system, electrical power monitoring and a reserve power supply shall not be required. 

  • 5.3.3 Where fixed automatic fire-extinguishing systems are interconnected or interlocked with the cooking equipment power sources so that if the fire-extinguishing system becomes inoperable due to power failure, all sources of fuel and heat to all cooking appliances serviced by those power sources shall automatically shut off. 

  • 5.4* System Location. 

  • 5.4.1 Wet chemical containers and expellant gas assemblies shall be located within the temperature range specified in the manufacturer’s listed installation and maintenance manual. 

  • 5.4.2 If ambient temperatures outside the manufacturer’s operating temperature range are expected, protection shall be provided to maintain the temperature within the listed range. 

  • 5.4.3 Wet chemical containers and expellant gas assemblies shall not be located where they could be subjected to mechanical, chemical, or other damage. 

  • 5.4.4 Where damage due to chemical or mechanical exposure is expected, protective devices such as enclosures or guards acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction shall be provided. 

  • 5.4.5 Wet chemical containers and expellant gas assemblies shall be accessible for inspection, maintenance, and recharge. 

  • 5.4.6 Wet chemical containers and expellant gas assemblies shall be located per the manufacturer's limitations but not where they will be exposed to the fire. 

  • 5.5 Discharge Nozzles. 

  • All discharge nozzles shall be located to minimize damage or misalignment and be within the limitations and constraints of the manufacturer's listed installation and maintenance manual. (See Section 4.3.)

  • 5.6 Special Requirements. 

  • 5.6.1 Systems protecting two or more hoods or plenums, or both, that meet the requirements of 5.1.5 shall be installed to ensure the simultaneous operation of all systems protecting the hoods, plenums, and associated cooking appliances located below the hoods. 

  • 5.6.1.1 The building owner(s) shall be responsible for the protection of a common exhaust duct(s) used by more than one tenant. 

  • 5.6.1.2 The tenant shall be responsible for the protection of common exhaust duct(s) serving hoods located within the tenant’s space and up to the point of connection to the building owner’s common exhaust duct. 

  • 5.6.1.3 The tenant’s common duct shall be considered a branch duct to the building owner’s common duct. 

  • 5.6.1.4 A single listed detection device shall be permitted for more than one appliance when installed in accordance with the system’s listing. 

  • 5.6.1.5 At least one fusible link or heat detector shall be installed within each exhaust duct opening in accordance with the manufacturer’s listing. 

  • 5.6.1.6 A fusible link or heat detector shall be provided above each protected cooking appliance and in accordance with the extinguishing system manufacturer’s listing. 

  • 5.6.1.6.1 Fusible links or heat detectors located at or within 12 in. (305 mm) into the exhaust duct opening and above the protected appliance shall be permitted to meet the requirements of 5.6.1.6. 

  • 5.6.1.7 Where the pipe or other conduit penetrates a duct or hood, the penetration shall have a liquidtight continuous external weld or shall be sealed by a listed device. 

  • 5.6.2* Protection of Common Exhaust Duct.

  • 5.6.2.1 Common exhaust ducts shall be protected by one of the following methods:   

  • (1)*Simultaneous operation of all independent hood, duct, and appliance protection systems 

  • (2)*Simultaneous operation of any hood, duct, and appliance protection system and the system(s) protecting the entire common exhaust duct 

  • 5.6.2.1.1 A fusible link or other mechanically operated heat detection device from the common duct fire-extinguishing system shall be located at each branch duct–to–common duct connection where electrical operation of the common duct fire-extinguishing system does not meet the requirements of 5.3.1. 

  • 5.6.2.1.2 Where a fusible link or mechanically operated heat detector is located at a branch duct–to–common duct connection, an access panel shall be installed in accordance with NFPA 96, to enable servicing of the detector where the detector is not accessible from the branch duct connection to the exhaust hood. 

  • 5.6.2.2 All sources of fuel or heat to appliances served by the common exhaust duct shall be shut down upon actuation of any protection system in accordance with 4.4.3. 

  • 5.6.3*Ignition sources contained within any exhaust system shall be protected and have a separate detection system that is in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations and that is approved by the authority having jurisdiction. 

  • 5.6.4 Movable cooking equipment shall be provided with a means to ensure that it is correctly positioned in relation to the appliance discharge nozzle during cooking operations. 


Nfpa 96 200838 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

Chapter 12 Minimum Safety Requirements for Cooking Equipment 

12.1 Cooking Equipment. 

12.1.1 Cooking equipment shall be approved based on one of the following criteria:   

(1)      Listings by a testing laboratory 

(2)      Test data acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction

12.1.2 Installation.

12.1.2.1 All listed appliances shall be installed in accordance with the terms of their listings and the manufacturer’s instructions.  

12.1.2.2*  Cooking appliances requiring protection shall not be moved, modified, or rearranged without prior re-evaluation of the fire-extinguishing system by the system installer or servicing agent, unless otherwise allowed by the design of the fire-extinguishing system.  

12.1.2.3 The fire-extinguishing system shall not require re-evaluation where the cooking appliances are moved for the purposes of maintenance and cleaning, provided the appliances are returned to approved design location prior to cooking operations, and any disconnected fire-extinguishing system nozzles attached to the appliances are reconnected in accordance with the manufacturer’s listed design manual.  

12.1.2.3.1 An approved method shall be provided that will ensure that the appliance is returned to an approved design location.  

12.1.2.4 All deep-fat fryers shall be installed with at least a 406 mm (16 in.) space between the fryer and surface flames from adjacent cooking equipment.  

12.1.2.5 Where a steel or tempered glass baffle plate is installed at a minimum 203 mm (8 in.) in height between the fryer and surface flames of the adjacent appliance, the requirement for a 406 mm (16 in.) space shall not apply.  

12.1.2.5.1 If the fryer and the surface flames are at different horizontal planes, the minimum height of 203 mm (8 in.) shall be measured from the higher of the two.

12.2 Operating Controls. 

Deep-fat fryers shall be equipped with a separate high-limit control in addition to the adjustable operating control (thermostat) to shut off fuel or energy when the fat temperature reaches  246°C (475°F) at  25.4 mm (1 in.) below the surface.


Csa b149 1 05 l.jpg
CSA B149.1 - 05

  • Commercial cooking appliance - an appliance that complies with the applicable CSA Standard covering hotel and restaurant ranges and unit broilers, hotel and restaurant deep fat fryers, commercial baking and roasting ovens, counter appliances, kettles, steam cookers, or steam generators.


Csa b149 1 0540 l.jpg
CSA B149.1 - 05

  • Section 7.31 Commercial cooking appliances

  • 7.31.1 A commercial cooking applianceshall be installed level on a firm foundation.

  • 7.31.2 When installed on an unprotected combustible material, the appliance shall have legs that provide a minimum of 4 in (100 mm) clearance between the metal base and the material.

  • 7.31.3 When the appliance does not have legs at least 4 in (100 mm) high, it shall not be installed on combustible material, except when the material under the appliance is protected with sheet metal and 2 in (50 mm) of air space is maintained between the base of the appliance and the sheet metal.

  • 7.31.4 A noncombustible fixed means shall be provided to maintain a minimum clearance of 6 in (150 mm) between combustible material and the sides and rear of an appliance. See also Clause 6.21.5.

  • 7.31.5 Any portion of combustible material located within 18 in (450 mm) horizontally of a cooking top section shall be protected for a vertical distance of 36 in (900 mm) above the surface of the cooking top.

  • 7.31.6 A clearance of not less than 16 in (400 mm) shall be provided between a deep fat fryer and an open flame of an adjacent appliance unless a noncombustible divider extending not less than 7 in (175 mm) above the fryer and the open flame of the adjacent appliance is provided.


Csa b149 1 0541 l.jpg
CSA B149.1 - 05

  • 6.21.4

  • Commercial cooking appliances certified for use with casters or otherwise subject to movement for cleaning and other large gas utilization equipment that can be moved shall be connected by a certified connector in accordance with ANSI Z21.69/CSA 6.16.

  • 6.21.5

  • When the connector described in Clause 6.21.4 is used with a commercial cooking appliance installed on wheels or rollers, a noncombustible restraining device shall be provided to protect the connector, and the installation shall be in accordance with Clause 7.31.4.


Csa b149 1 0542 l.jpg
CSA B149.1 - 05

  • 6.18.3

  • The requirements for an individual manual shut-off valve specified in Clause 6.18.2 may be waived when a readily accessible single manual shut-off valve is

  • (a) installed for commercial cooking appliances manifolded in line;


Csa b149 1 0543 l.jpg
CSA B149.1 - 05

  • 7.20.14 When a DFMAH is either installed in or ducted to a kitchen, it shall be installed in accordance with the following procedure:

    - (a) Where the food preparation area and the area frequented by the public is interconnected by means

    (i) of either normally closed doors or a permanent opening(s) and the total free area of the opening(s) does not exceed 16 ft2 (1.5 m2), the DFMAH shall be interlocked with a mechanical exhaust system and the proven airflow capacity of the interlocked exhaust system shall not be less than 90% of the make-up air supply; or

    (ii) other than those indicated in Item (i), the DFMAH shall be interlocked with a mechanical exhaust system and the proven airflow capacity of the interlocked exhaust system shall in no case be less than 100% or more than 105% of the make-up air supply.


Mfc 2 6 1 944 l.jpg
MFC 2.6.1.9

  • 2.6.1.9.Commercial Cooking Equipment

  • 1)Commercial cooking equipment exhaust and fire protection systems shall be designed and installed in conformance with the NBC.

  • 2)Except as required in Sentences (3) to (5), the use, inspection and maintenance of commercial cooking equipment exhaust and fire protection systems shall be in conformance with NFPA 96, “Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations.”

  • 3)Hoods, grease removal devices, fans, ducts, and other appurtenances shall be cleaned at frequent intervals to prevent surfaces from becoming heavily contaminated with grease or other residues. (See Appendix A.)

  • 4)Flammable cleaning materials or solvents shall not be used for the cleaning of exhaust systems.

  • 5)Instructions for manually operating the fire protection systems shall be posted conspicuously in the kitchen as part of the fire safety plan.

  • 6)Commercial cooking equipment that is certified shall be installed and maintained in conformance with its certification.

  • 7)Uncertified commercial cooking equipment shall be installed and maintained so as not to create a fire hazard.


Nfpa 96 200845 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

  • 11.1 Operating Procedures. 

  • 11.1.1 Exhaust systems shall be operated whenever cooking equipment is turned on.  

  • 11.1.2 Filter-equipped exhaust systems shall not be operated with filters removed.  

  • 11.1.3 Openings provided for replacing air exhausted through ventilating equipment shall not be restricted by covers, dampers, or any other means that would reduce the operating efficiency of the exhaust system.  

  • 11.1.4 Instructions for manually operating the fire-extinguishing system shall be posted conspicuously in the kitchen and shall be reviewed with employees by the management.  

  • 11.1.5 Listed exhaust hoods shall be operated in accordance with the terms of their listings and the manufacturer’s instructions.  

  • 11.1.6 Cooking equipment shall not be operated while its fire-extinguishing system or exhaust system is nonoperational or otherwise impaired.  

  • 11.1.7 Secondary filtration and pollution control equipment shall be operated in accordance with the terms of its listing and the manufacturer's recommendations. 

  • 11.1.8 Inspection and maintenance of equipment allowed in 9.3.1 shall be conducted by properly trained and qualified persons at a frequency determined by the manufacturer's instructions or equipment listing.


Mfc a 2 6 1 9 3 l.jpg
MFC A-2.6.1.9.(3)

  • Depending on the amount of cooking equipment usage, the entire exhaust system, including grease extractors, should be inspected at intervals not greater than 7 days to determine if grease or other residues have been deposited within. When grease or other residues are in evidence as deposits within the hood, grease removal devices, or ducts, the system should be cleaned. In general, exhaust systems should be cleaned at intervals not greater than 12 months, but in the case of deep fat cooking, char broiling or similar cooking operations, the systems should be cleaned at intervals not greater than 3 months.


Nfpa 96 200847 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

  • 11.2 Inspection of Fire-Extinguishing Systems. 

  • 11.2.1*  Maintenance of the fire-extinguishing systems  and listed exhaust hoods containing a constant or fire-activated water system that is listed to extinguish a fire in the grease removal devices, hood exhaust plenums, and exhaust ducts shall be made by properly trained, qualified, and certified person(s) acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction at least every 6 months. 

  • 11.2.2 All actuation components, including remote manual pull stations, mechanical or electrical devices, detectors, and actuators, shall be checked for proper operation during the inspection in accordance with the manufacturer’s listed procedures. 

  • 11.2.3 The specific inspection and maintenance requirements of the extinguishing system standards as well as the applicable listed installation and maintenance manuals and service bulletins shall be followed. 

  • 11.2.4*  Fusible links and automatic sprinkler heads shall be replaced at least semiannually or more frequently if necessary where required by the manufacturer. 

  • 11.2.5 The year of manufacture and the date of installation of the fusible links shall be marked on the system inspection tag. The tag shall be signed or initialed by the installer.  

  • 11.2.6 Detection devices other than fusible links and automatic sprinklers shall be serviced or replaced in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations.  

  • 11.2.7 Where automatic bulb-type sprinklers or spray nozzles are used and annual examination shows no buildup of grease or other material on the sprinkler or spray nozzles, annual replacement shall not be required.  

  • 11.2.8 Where required, certificates of inspection and maintenance shall be forwarded to the authority having jurisdiction.


Nfpa 96 200848 l.jpg
NFPA 96 - 2008

  • 11.4* Inspection for Grease Buildup. 

  • The entire exhaust system shall be inspected for grease buildup by a properly trained, qualified, and certified company or person(s) acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction and in accordance with Table 11.4.


Nbc 2010 l.jpg
NBC 2010

  • PROPOSED CHANGE

  • Replace Sentence 3.2.4.8.(2) as follows:

  • 3.2.4.8. Annunciator and Zone Indication

  • 2) Except as permitted by Sentence (6), the annunciator required by Sentence (1) shall have separate zone indication of the actuation of the alarm initiating devices in each

  • a) floor area so that the area of coverage for each zone in a building that is not sprinklered is not more than 2 000 m²,

  • b) floor area so that the area of coverage for each zone is neither

  • i) more than one storey, nor

  • ii) more than the system area limits as specified in NFPA 13, “Installation of Sprinkler Systems,”

  • c) shaft required to be equipped with smoke detectors,

  • d) air-handling system required to be equipped with smoke detectors,

  • e) fire extinguishing system required by NFPA 96, “Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations,”

  • ef) contained use area,

  • fg) impeded egress zone, and

  • gh) fire compartment required by Sentence 3.3.3.5.(2).


ad