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Description. Description. Your next essay will require careful and detailed description. Two types: Objective Facts and observable details Can still be interesting Subjective Creates impressions through details and imagery Can be emotional, create moods

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Description


Description

  • Your next essay will require careful and detailed description.

  • Two types:

    • Objective

      • Facts and observable details

      • Can still be interesting

    • Subjective

      • Creates impressions through details and imagery

      • Can be emotional, create moods

      • Most description is blended—a combination of objective and subjective.


Dominant impression

  • To create a dominant impression, you express your main point about what you’re describing.

    • This means you may not necessarily describe everything you see. Group details around a key idea.


Diction

  • Your diction, or choice of words, is very important in description. To liven up description, use:

    • Expressive verbs (She heaved the box over the fence instead of She moved the box over the fence.)

    • Plenty of adjectives (It was a bright, sunny, yet slightly chilly day.)

    • Consider metaphors and similes


Activity

  • Part 1: With a partner, take a look at Capote and Urrea’s texts.

  • Jot down some notes about what makes their description lively. What kinds of words do they use? What are they doing with their language to help you clearly see a picture?

  • Then, we’ll discuss as a class.


Activity Part 2

  • Take a look at this Bud Light commercial. I’ll play it twice.

  • http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/our-10-funniest-commercials-from-super-bowl-xlviii-020214?related=e8cdad9a-e9dc-4a07-8444-b24fe2614fbe

  • Then, working with the person next to you, type up a description of this commercial. No analysis yet. Just describe it.

  • Email your description to me at jpack1@pima.edu

  • We’ll work together as a class to make this a detailed and lively description.


Activity Part 3

  • Lastly, working with your partners, make an argument about this commercial. Write your argument on a piece of paper, remember that the argument is NOT OBVIOUS and shouldn’t just be about the product.


Logical Fallacies or Errors in Critical Thinking

AKA: what NOT to do when making an argument


Fallacy

  • An error in an argument

  • Usually related to reasoning

  • There are four types:

    • Emotional

    • Support

    • Inconsistency

    • Choice


Fallacies you might discover in your papers

  • Blanket statements

    • Use the language of absoluteness

    • Slippery Slope

      • Because one minor event happened, a much larger event will follow

      • Usually has negative connotations

    • Hasty Generalization

      • Taking a single case and generalizing from it


More fallacies

  • Non sequitur or red herring

    • One statement does not logically relate to or follow from another

    • False authority

      • Using the testimonial of someone who is not credible on the subject at hand

      • Double standard

        • Applying different judgments to similar things

        • Bandwagon

          • Following popular tastes

          • Everyone believes it, so I should too.


Fallacies continued

  • Equivocation

    • Arguing for both sides of the same argument

    • Circular Argument

      • Relies on its own claim for support

      • Ad Hominem

        • Arguing based on a person’s character, personality, etc.


Examples

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXLTQi7vVsI

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CPbJpL4UnY0


How does this relate to your essay?

  • When might you be tempted to make fallacious arguments?


Activity

  • Get in groups of three.

  • Pull out one piece of paper and decide on a group recorder.

  • I will pull up some images one at a time.

  • Discuss the image as a group and write down the following:

    • What type of logical fallacy is this?

    • Jot down notes to explain why.


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