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Description. Description. Your next essay will require careful and detailed description. Two types: Objective Facts and observable details Can still be interesting Subjective Creates impressions through details and imagery Can be emotional, create moods

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Description1
Description

  • Your next essay will require careful and detailed description.

  • Two types:

    • Objective

      • Facts and observable details

      • Can still be interesting

    • Subjective

      • Creates impressions through details and imagery

      • Can be emotional, create moods

      • Most description is blended—a combination of objective and subjective.


Dominant impression
Dominant impression

  • To create a dominant impression, you express your main point about what you’re describing.

    • This means you may not necessarily describe everything you see. Group details around a key idea.


Diction
Diction

  • Your diction, or choice of words, is very important in description. To liven up description, use:

    • Expressive verbs (She heaved the box over the fence instead of She moved the box over the fence.)

    • Plenty of adjectives (It was a bright, sunny, yet slightly chilly day.)

    • Consider metaphors and similes


Activity
Activity

  • Part 1: With a partner, take a look at Capote and Urrea’s texts.

  • Jot down some notes about what makes their description lively. What kinds of words do they use? What are they doing with their language to help you clearly see a picture?

  • Then, we’ll discuss as a class.


Activity part 2
Activity Part 2

  • Take a look at this Bud Light commercial. I’ll play it twice.

  • http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/our-10-funniest-commercials-from-super-bowl-xlviii-020214?related=e8cdad9a-e9dc-4a07-8444-b24fe2614fbe

  • Then, working with the person next to you, type up a description of this commercial. No analysis yet. Just describe it.

  • Email your description to me at [email protected]

  • We’ll work together as a class to make this a detailed and lively description.


Activity part 3
Activity Part 3

  • Lastly, working with your partners, make an argument about this commercial. Write your argument on a piece of paper, remember that the argument is NOT OBVIOUS and shouldn’t just be about the product.


Logical fallacies or errors in critical thinking

Logical Fallacies or Errors in Critical Thinking

AKA: what NOT to do when making an argument


Fallacy
Fallacy

  • An error in an argument

  • Usually related to reasoning

  • There are four types:

    • Emotional

    • Support

    • Inconsistency

    • Choice


Fallacies you might discover in your papers
Fallacies you might discover in your papers

  • Blanket statements

    • Use the language of absoluteness

    • Slippery Slope

      • Because one minor event happened, a much larger event will follow

      • Usually has negative connotations

    • Hasty Generalization

      • Taking a single case and generalizing from it


More fallacies
More fallacies

  • Non sequitur or red herring

    • One statement does not logically relate to or follow from another

    • False authority

      • Using the testimonial of someone who is not credible on the subject at hand

      • Double standard

        • Applying different judgments to similar things

        • Bandwagon

          • Following popular tastes

          • Everyone believes it, so I should too.


Fallacies continued
Fallacies continued

  • Equivocation

    • Arguing for both sides of the same argument

    • Circular Argument

      • Relies on its own claim for support

      • Ad Hominem

        • Arguing based on a person’s character, personality, etc.


Examples
Examples

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXLTQi7vVsI

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CPbJpL4UnY0


How does this relate to your essay
How does this relate to your essay?

  • When might you be tempted to make fallacious arguments?


Activity1
Activity

  • Get in groups of three.

  • Pull out one piece of paper and decide on a group recorder.

  • I will pull up some images one at a time.

  • Discuss the image as a group and write down the following:

    • What type of logical fallacy is this?

    • Jot down notes to explain why.


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