Becoming a Problem: How and Why Children Acquire a Reputation as ‘Naughty’ in the Earliest Years...
Download
1 / 11

Funded by the Economic and Social Research Council - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 66 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Becoming a Problem: How and Why Children Acquire a Reputation as ‘Naughty’ in the Earliest Years at School. Funded by the Economic and Social Research Council Prof Maggie MacLure, Dr Liz Jones, Dr Rachel Holmes & Dr Christina MacRae. The Aims of the Project.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha

Download Presentation

Funded by the Economic and Social Research Council

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Becoming a Problem: How and Why Children Acquire a Reputation as ‘Naughty’ in the Earliest Years at School

Funded by the Economic and Social Research Council

Prof Maggie MacLure, Dr Liz Jones, Dr Rachel Holmes & Dr Christina MacRae


The Aims of the Project

  • To document and critically examine the emergence of problem behaviour amongst children in the Foundation Stage of school

  • To enhance understandings of the processes by which children begin to develop an identity and ‘career’ as a problem in school

  • To inform public and policy debate about behaviour and discipline in the early years

  • To contribute to the development of theory in the field of classroom interaction and pupil identity


The four schools

  • A ‘faith’ school

  • An inner city school where over 30 home languages are spoken

  • A school in a ‘leafy’ suburb

  • A school in a relatively poor economic area with a population of mainly white English heritage pupils


Negotiating Access

  • Respect for persons

  • Permission

  • Confidentiality

  • Consent

  • Negotiation of data


Theoretical framework

  • Qualitative study that draws on ethnography

  • Discourse based approach informed by poststructuralist theory

  • Analytical framework also draws on conversational analysis


Research questions

  • What makes it difficult for some children to be, and to be recognised as, ‘good students’?

  • How does behaviour become an ‘issue’?

  • How is consensus over appropriate/inappropriate behaviour established and maintained?

  • At what point do teachers and other children start to associate particular children with behaviour problems?

  • How far are children able, with adult support, to reflect on their own behaviour and contribute to productive changes in their own behaviour?

  • How does an act come to be interpreted by the teacher, and recognised by children, as an instance of inappropriate behaviour

  • Can behaviour flashpoints be predicted, contained or avoided?


Methods

  • Participant observation with an ethnographic orientation

  • Videos

  • Participant and non-participant observations (notes)

  • Unstructured interviews with practitioners and children


The fieldwork

  • Phase 1 (Sept 06-Aug 07)

  • Observations over a whole school year

  • One day a week spent in each of the classrooms

  • Meeting with the participating teachers so as to examine some of the preliminary findings


The fieldwork

  • Phase 2: follow-up phase

  • Tracking the children as they move into their new class

  • Do ‘ bad reputations’ travel?


Analysis of the data

  • Identifying themes

  • Developing theories

  • Using existing literature to substantiate and extend ideas


ad
  • Login