Propagation of Waxflowers by Cuttings

Propagation of Waxflowers by Cuttings PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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The Centre for Native Floriculture. The end product. The Centre for Native Floriculture. Sources of Cuttings. Most UQ Nursery cuttings are sourced from Ebonybrook Flower Farm on the Gatton-Esk road and Caldicotts, Milmerran. The manager of Ebonybrook is an ex employee of UQ Gatton. The Centre for Native Floriculture.

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Propagation of Waxflowers by Cuttings

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1. The Centre for Native Floriculture Propagation of Waxflowers by Cuttings Ian Gordon Centre for Native Floriculture University of Queensland Gatton

2. The Centre for Native Floriculture

3. The Centre for Native Floriculture Sources of Cuttings Most UQ Nursery cuttings are sourced from Ebonybrook Flower Farm on the Gatton-Esk road and Caldicotts, Milmerran. The manager of Ebonybrook is an ex employee of UQ Gatton

4. The Centre for Native Floriculture Types of Stem Cuttings Softwood cuttings Semi-ripe cuttings Ripe evergreen cuttings

5. The Centre for Native Floriculture Softwood cuttings Physiologically soft and immature stem tips Often used in early spring Need well controlled propagation facility

6. The Centre for Native Floriculture Semi-ripe Cuttings Shoot tips which have undergone some physiological maturation Usually available from mid-summer to autumn Easier to keep alive

7. The Centre for Native Floriculture Ripe Evergreen Cuttings Physiologically mature shoot tips taken at end of growing season Easy to keep cuttings alive Slow to produce roots

8. The Centre for Native Floriculture When do we propagate? At almost any time of year when there are no flower buds present on the shoots The onset of flowering reduces the strike rate

9. The Centre for Native Floriculture The Propagation Environment Low light intensity – around 20% light High humidity 85-90% Provided by fog or mist Avoid overwet conditions – disease problems

10. The Centre for Native Floriculture The Propagation Environment Bench heating is essential during the cooler part of the year 21-25o C minimum night temperature We use low density poly pipes fitted under the benches

11. The Centre for Native Floriculture UQ Gatton fog system Aussie Fog system High pressure system with water pressure in the range of 500-1000 psi Good quality water essential System controlled by a humidistat

12. The Centre for Native Floriculture UQ Gatton fog system The humidistat is the main humidity control device However, to prevent overwetting, each burst of fog will switch off after 30 seconds

13. The Centre for Native Floriculture Cutting Quality High quality, disease-free shoots are essential A routine chlorine dip is given prior to trimming of cuttings All cuttings should be trimmed to a uniform size

14. The Centre for Native Floriculture Cutting Quality Cutting size 8-10 cm long preferred The leaves on the shoots are closely spaced so there is no difficulty in trimming to a node Remove the leaves from the bottom 2 cm

15. The Centre for Native Floriculture Cutting Quality Cuttings should be kept cool when brought in from the field They must not be allowed to desiccate during trimming Speedy transfer to the prop house

16. The Centre for Native Floriculture Auxin Treatment IBA liquid gives best results With softwood cuttings 2000-4000 ppm best With more mature cuttings higher rates may be necessary Quick dip best

17. The Centre for Native Floriculture Propagation Media A high quality, hygienic propagation mix must be used We use equal parts sphagnum peat, perlite and vermiculite Mini Osmocote is added for nutrition

18. The Centre for Native Floriculture Propagation Containers We use a 100 cell tray with a small cell volume The cell is designed to promote air pruning of roots This cell tray is durable and long lasting

19. The Centre for Native Floriculture Propagation Containers This picture shows roots emerging from the base of the cell This is the basis of the air pruning effect The bench heating system helps promote air pruning

20. The Centre for Native Floriculture Propagation Containers Tubing up of rooted cuttings from these cell trays into 50mm tubes is quick and easy Most nurseries and flower growers want to buy in 50mm tubes

21. The Centre for Native Floriculture Propagation Hygiene All trays of cuttings should be checked each day for insects and diseases Fallen or diseased leaves should be removed Dead cuttings should be removed

22. The Centre for Native Floriculture Diseases in Propagation The high humidity promotes many fungal and bacterial diseases Pythium Rhizoctonia Fusarium

23. The Centre for Native Floriculture A Routine Spray Program Sprays are applied as a regular weekly schedule using the following chemicals Banrot Octave Fongarid Benlate Thiram

24. The Centre for Native Floriculture Propagation Success Rates Factors affecting strike rate include: Variety Time of year Condition of shoots Level of control of propagation environment Attention to detail

25. The Centre for Native Floriculture Propagation Success Rate Some batches of cuttings give close to 100% strike Others may be less than 20% Good quality stem material is essential for propagation success

26. The Centre for Native Floriculture Hardening off of cuttings After rooting, trays should be removed from the heated benches and placed in a weaning area Weaning involves reducing the moisture and increasing the light level

27. The Centre for Native Floriculture Hardening off of cuttings Weaning should be carried out for 10-14 days Proper weaning allows the network of root hairs to develop in the roots This makes moisture uptake more efficient

28. The Centre for Native Floriculture Tubing up of cuttings 50mm round, 50mm square tubes and native tubes are widely used as containers for tubestock A good quality propagation mix must be used

29. The Centre for Native Floriculture Pruning of Tubestock Tubed cuttings should have the shoot tips trimmed 2-3 times to promote a bushy, multi-stem growth 5-6 weeks after tubing, the plants can be despatched

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