MSc in Manufacturing Leadership

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Why MSc in Manufacturing Leadership? . Engineering education:Educate for a career of an engineering specialist.Lack of knowledge to understand the role of technology and engineering competency in shaping a strategic position of a manufacturing organisation.Lack of skills to work over functional a

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MSc in Manufacturing Leadership

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1. MSc in Manufacturing Leadership

2. Why MSc in Manufacturing Leadership? Engineering education: Educate for a career of an engineering specialist. Lack of knowledge to understand the role of technology and engineering competency in shaping a strategic position of a manufacturing organisation. Lack of skills to work over functional and cultural borders. Ignore lateral and divergent thinking.

3. Why MSc in Manufacturing Leadership? MBA education: Generic business topics free of any particular technology context Many topics relevant for manufacturing organisations largely ignored Build on the assumption that engineering background and MBA education will lead to synergies Advances in technology development completely ignored

4. Identity of the MSc in Manufacturing Leadership Designed as a sector specific MSc (MBA). Focused on practicing managers. Interdisciplinary nature assured by linking business and engineering-based modules. Focus on contemporary topics centred on manufacturing and service engineering context. Creating unique learning experience. Unique balance between conceptual knowledge, practical tools and learning through action.

5. Use of case study methods, utilizing both the historical cases and live cases from companies in which participants work. Extensive use of guest lecturers. Experiential learning including group discussions and team working. Project-based. Critically link theory and practice. Teaching period: short course 32 contact hours. Two blocks of two days separated by a period of three weeks. Three year programme Teaching and learning methods

6. Structure of the programme

7. Business project In a Business project candidates demonstrate synthesis of conceptual knowledge and analytical techniques gained through the programme and implement them in an action-based learning context. They identify a change initiative of an appropriate strategic relevance and prepare actions for implementing the chosen initiative. In project they gather, analyse and interpret relevant evidence and combine academic depth with an appreciation of relevant management issues.

8. Entry requirements Applicants will normally require a good honours degree or equivalent professional qualification and a minimum of five years relevant work experience (including some time in a supervisory or managerial capacity). Applicants without these qualifications but with significant work experience, combined with a strong supporting case made by the sponsoring business, may be admitted at the discretion of the University. Evidence that the applicant will be promoted or given greater responsibility in the near future will also be taken into consideration.

9. Strategic management of technology and manufacturing innovation Day 1 - Strategic Management – The richness of strategic concepts will be provided in order to illustrate the multifaceted nature of strategy. The second part of the session will focus on the origins of competitive advantage, emphasizing the strategic relevance of unique resources, knowledge and capabilities. Day 2 –Technology Management – The dynamic models of technology evolution views technology as having a life of its own with radical phases and incremental phases, each of them may take a different type of firm to succeed. New concepts challenge the dynamics of punctuated equilibrium and suggest speed of technology demand the continuous management of discontinuity. Day 3 – Innovation Management - The session focuses on the most common pitfalls in managing innovation and presents ‘best practice’ techniques and concepts for overcoming them. Day 4 – Manufacturing strategy – This session focuses on how manufacturing operations supports a competitive advantage. It discusses the existence and importance of trade-offs and possible ways to eliminate them.

10. Manufacturing internationalisation Systematic analyse of the changing patterns in managing flows from suppliers, through manufacturing and distribution to the customers, Demonstrate understanding of how to manage the manufacturing interface with R&D, engineering and marketing; Understand the implications of e-commerce and mobile (M-commerce) business models and technologies on the product-service offerings supply networks .

11. Leadership and change How to manage the change from current circumstances to more suitable arrangements Investigate and diagnose what is going on in organisations Understand how people facilitate or resist change Identify practical ways of managing issues arising from internally planed and externally imposed organisational change Ensure leadership and sustainability of change.

12. Manufacturing futures Develop an understanding of future demands on manufacturing systems through considering industrial and government studies and reports Present and the future of different emergent technologies with the potential to increase competitiveness of manufacturing organisation. Audit their own manufacturing practices and technology against future scenarios, and in the context of company strategy, in order to develop a technology management plan.

13. Operations Philosophies and Innovation Introduce the student to Operations Management theories and models, and to develop their knowledge of what OM is and what it encompasses. Develop the student’s understanding of the key issues and concerns related to the Operations Management discipline. Explore a variety of Operations Philosophies, looking at the concept of an operations philosophy, their typical lifecycle and impact on practice. Explore how innovation can be applied within organisations and used to support operations.

14. New product development Understand the steps involved in a new product development process. Understand how to fit new products into your company product portfolio Develop a new, innovative product using a specified gated process. Understand and practice identifying customers and their needs. Understand and practice developing product specifications. Rank product specs, features and functions. Understand and practice brainstorming and concept generation. Understand and practice concept screening and selection. Evaluate case studies according to the above parameters and processes. Apply the product development tools to your company's process. Use the following NPD tools:  affinity process, QFD, AHP,function decomposition, competitive map, value opportunity analysis, concept combination table, rapid prototyping, concept selection matrix, simulation modeling,

15. Strategic Finance demonstrate understanding of key financial statements, financial analysis, key aspects of internal accounting systems, performance management, investment appraisal, key concepts in corporate finance and mergers & acquisitions understand how accountings systems and standards, and financial markets affect and reflect the performance and operations of manufacturing organisations, identify and recognise future opportunities through understanding key accounting and finance opportunities.

16. Change Management in Manufacturing Day 1 - Re-designing work systems – This will focus on managing the re-design of working practices on the shopfloor and will include consideration of changing roles and responsibilities, working practices, work structures, control systems and targets. Day 2 – Introducing new technology – This will focus on managing the introduction of new technology and will include consideration of why many such investments fail to meet their objectives, and what companies can do to improve their success rate. Day 3 – Planning change This will give course members practical experience of methods for planning change in a collaborative way, and involving key stakeholders. This session will involve group work. Day 4 – Review and ‘Good Practice’ Course members will give feedback on their assignments in the form of individual presentations to the group, followed by discussion of the Lessons Learned. The group will develop a set of ‘Good Practice’ guidelines and ideas to take back to their companies.

17. Designing for manufacture and assembly The module introduces the notions of design for manufacture and assembly and presents the fundamentals of the technology. Industrial application is illustrated through team-based case studies and strategies for implementation and IT support are also included. We know Ken Swift through collaboration in the Centre for Industrial Collaboration in Engineering Design (Design CIC). This course is based on a course he delivers in house to companies, notably Rolls Royce. It will be modified to encompass different perspectives of the different companies on the course.We know Ken Swift through collaboration in the Centre for Industrial Collaboration in Engineering Design (Design CIC). This course is based on a course he delivers in house to companies, notably Rolls Royce. It will be modified to encompass different perspectives of the different companies on the course.

18. Product Data Engineering This module will enable students to understand and apply general information modelling techniques, build a simple engineering information system and apply it to real engineering and design situations. Students will learn to map out product structures and to develop engineering information systems for their own company’s products. This will be delivered as an e-learning module with on line activities. There will be fewer face to face sessions, as a result, used for participants to develop and present their own company case studies, which will be discussed by the group.This will be delivered as an e-learning module with on line activities. There will be fewer face to face sessions, as a result, used for participants to develop and present their own company case studies, which will be discussed by the group.

19. Sustainable engineering Sustainability and environmental good practice has become a significant influence on manufacturing business and its importance is expected to increase further in future years. The module will review models and methodologies for good practice in sustainable design and manufacturing, discuss issues in social-economic-environmental balance and develop these themes in case study examples. Students will be expected to apply sustainable design methodologies to products and services within their own organisations. This is a new module, being developed especially for this programme. Some new case studies from the automotive and medical sectors are being developed. Some software tools for sustainable design planning will be introduced and used by the participants in their own company case studies.This is a new module, being developed especially for this programme. Some new case studies from the automotive and medical sectors are being developed. Some software tools for sustainable design planning will be introduced and used by the participants in their own company case studies.

20. Rapid Manufacturing The module will review the key technologies and provide an overview of the underpinning scientific principles. CAD modelling techniques will be reviewed and an overview given of one such tool. The role of the rapid manufacturing process within the product life cycle will be considered, using case studies. Students will develop a case study of their own, related to their company, from design through to prototyping. This is a new module developed especially for the programme. It is based on research and commercial collaboration carried out over approximately 15 years running a selective laser sintering (SLS) facility in Leeds University. This is a new module developed especially for the programme. It is based on research and commercial collaboration carried out over approximately 15 years running a selective laser sintering (SLS) facility in Leeds University.

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