slide1
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Using Conversion Factors

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 26

Using Conversion Factors - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 87 Views
  • Uploaded on

Using Conversion Factors. a mole also represents an amount of something. It is 6.02 x 10 of something. A mole can represent 6.02 x 10 donuts, iguanas, toes, etc. In chemistry , it is normally used to represent an amount of atoms, ions, molecules, or formula units.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Using Conversion Factors' - rue


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Using

Conversion

Factors

slide2

a mole also represents an amount of something.

It is 6.02 x 10 of something. A mole can

represent 6.02 x 10 donuts, iguanas, toes, etc.

In chemistry, it is normally used to represent

an amount of atoms, ions, molecules, or formula

units.

Collectively, atoms, ions, molecules, or formula

units are called representative particles.

23

23

Just like a dozen represents 12 of something,

such as donuts, iguanas, chemistry assignments, etc.,

slide3

Because chemists deal with such

large amounts of particles,

it is easier to work with moles of particles

slide4

amounts of particles can be expressed

not only as moles,

but as mass (grams),

as volume (liters), and

as individual particles (atoms, molecules,

ions, formula units, etc.)

slide5

O

H

H

a measurement of a sample

of a molecule, H2O for example,

can be converted

from mass

to moles

to particles

to volume

and back again

to any unit of measurement desired

slide6

this is so cool!!

using

the right

conversion

factors

slide16

35 g Al

? moles Al

slide17

1 mol

35 g Al x

27 g

slide18

1 mol

35 g Al x

27 g

35 g Al x 1 mol

27g

=

slide19

=

1.3 mols Al

1 mol

35 g Al x

27 g

35 mol Al

27

=

slide20

? mass SiO2

0.8 moles SiO2

slide21

? mass SiO2

0.8 moles SiO2

slide22

60.1 g SiO2

1 mole SiO2

0.8 moles SiO2x

= 0.8 x 60.1 g SiO2

= 48.1 g SiO2

slide24

200 g N2O

? molecules N2O

slide25

200 g N2O

? molecules N2O

slide26

23

1 mole N2O 6.02 x 10 molecules N2O

44.0 g N2O 1 mole N2O

this is so cool!!

200 g N2O x x

23

200 x 6.02 x 10 molecules N2O

44.0

=

24

= 2.74 x 10 molecules N2O

ad