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Center for Astrophysical Sciences at Johns Hopkins University 1. Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Node Coordinator: Tim Heckman Alex Szalay, professor Tamas Budavari, postdoc Charles Hoopes, postdoc. Center for Astrophysical Sciences at Johns Hopkins University. Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

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Center for astrophysical sciences at johns hopkins university 1
Center for Astrophysical Sciences at Johns Hopkins University 1

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Node Coordinator: Tim Heckman

Alex Szalay, professor

Tamas Budavari, postdoc

Charles Hoopes, postdoc


Center for astrophysical sciences at johns hopkins university
Center for Astrophysical Sciences at Johns Hopkins University

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

  • ACS: Advanced Camera for Surveys

  • JHU/GSFC Co-op

  • Apache Point Observatory

  • FUSE: Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer

  • GALEX: Galaxy Evolution Explorer


Center for astrophysical sciences at johns hopkins university1
Center for Astrophysical Sciences at Johns Hopkins University

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

  • ACS: Advanced Camera for Surveys

  • JHU/GSFC Co-op

  • Apache Point Observatory

  • FUSE: Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer

  • GALEX: Galaxy Evolution Explorer


Center for astrophysical sciences at johns hopkins university2
Center for Astrophysical Sciences at Johns Hopkins University

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

  • ACS: Advanced Camera for Surveys

  • JHU/GSFC Co-op

  • Apache Point Observatory

  • FUSE: Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer

  • GALEX: Galaxy Evolution Explorer

Cooperative agreement for

Research in astrophysics

Between JHU and GSFC

Laboratory for High Energy

Astrophysics (LHEA)


Center for astrophysical sciences at johns hopkins university3
Center for Astrophysical Sciences at Johns Hopkins University

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

  • ACS: Advanced Camera for Surveys

  • JHU/GSFC Co-op

  • Apache Point Observatory

  • FUSE: Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer

  • GALEX: Galaxy Evolution Explorer


Apache point observatory cloudcroft new mexico
Apache Point Observatory UniversityCloudcroft, New Mexico

  • SDSS telescopes

  • ARC 3.5 meter

    • SPIcam – optical imager

      • 5’ FOV

      • 0.14 “/pix

    • Echelle spectrograph

      • 3500 to 9800Å

      • R=37,500

    • Double Imaging Spectrograph

      • Simultaneous red and blue spectra

      • 3600 to 8000Å – 0.8 to 3 Å/pixel

    • GrIm II infrared imager and spectrograph

      • 1μm to 2.5μm

    • NIC-FPS – NIR camera and Fabry-Perot Spectrometer

      • 0.85 to 2.5 μm

  • JHU has a share of the time, and we have experience


Center for astrophysical sciences at johns hopkins university4
Center for Astrophysical Sciences at Johns Hopkins University

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

  • ACS: Advanced Camera for Surveys

  • JHU/GSFC Co-op

  • Apache Point Observatory

  • FUSE: Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer

  • GALEX: Galaxy Evolution Explorer


Far ultraviolet spectroscopic explorer fuse
Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) University

  • Spectroscopy from 905 – 1180Å, velocity resolution ~20 km s-1

  • Tim Heckman and Charles Hoopes are affiliated with the FUSE Science Team

  • FUSE Science

  • Metallicity of neutral gas in I Zw 18

  • (Aloisi et al. 2003)

  • 105 K gas in starburst superwinds

  • (Heckman et al. 2001, Hoopes et al. 2003)

  • H2 absorption in starbursts

  • (Hoopes et al. 2004)

  • FUV SEDs and Extinction in starbursts

  • (Buat et al. 2002)

  • FUV stellar libraries for OB stars

  • (Pellerin et al. 2002, Robert et al. 2003)

Currently in safe mode, but expected

to return to service

I Zw 18: Aloisi et al. 2003


Center for astrophysical sciences at johns hopkins university5
Center for Astrophysical Sciences at Johns Hopkins University

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

  • ACS: Advanced Camera for Surveys

  • JHU/GSFC Co-op

  • Apache Point Observatory

  • FUSE: Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer

  • GALEX: Galaxy Evolution Explorer


Galex the galaxy evolution explorer
GALEX: The Galaxy Evolution Explorer University

  • Launched April 28, 2003

  • Imaging in two UV bands

    • FUV: λ=1516Å, Δλ=268Å

    • NUV: λ=2267Å, Δλ=732Å

    • Spatial resolution ~5”

    • FOV ~1.2 deg2

  • Slitless Spectroscopy

    • 1350-2800Å

    • R=80-300

  • Tamas Budavari, Alex Szalay, Tim Heckman, Charles Hoopes on the GALEX Science Team


Galex surveys
GALEX Surveys University

* Planned area


Probing galaxy evolution with galex
Probing Galaxy Evolution Universitywith GALEX

  • Combo-17

  • NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS)

  • Ultraviolet Luminous Galaxies


Combo 17 cdfs
COMBO-17 / CDFS University

  • 17 band optical photometry (Wolf et al. 2004)

  • Photometric redshifts with δz/(1+z)<0.1 at R=24

  • Redshifts out z=1

Combo-17 filters


Galex cdfs data
GALEX CDFS Data University

  • GALEX FUV (1500Å) and NUV (2300Å)

    • Part of the Deep Imaging Survey (DIS)

  • CFDS_00: 44 ksec, 1sq deg

    • AB=25 in FUV,NUV

  • CDFS_01: 31 ksec, 1 sq deg

  • GALEX data are public as of January 2005


Evolution in the mass dependent star formation history of galaxies from z 0 to 1
Evolution in the Mass-Dependent Star Formation History of Galaxies from z=0 to 1

  • Use GALEX + (aperture corrected) Combo-17 photometry and library of BC03 models (following Kauffmann et al., Salim et al., etc) to derive:

    • SFR, UV Extinction, Stellar Mass

  • From GEMS catalog:

    • Sersic indices, Half-light radii, Surface mass density, SFR/area

  • Extend work of Kauffmann et al. and Brinchmann et al. to z=1

    • Examine SFR distribution vs. many parameters as a function of redshift (Mass, surface density, SFR, extinction, size, Sersic index)

    • Examine how SFR/M, SFR/size, Extinction varies with mass, surface density


N oao d eep w ide f ield s urvey ndwfs co pis arjun dey buell jannuzi
N Galaxies from z=0 to 1OAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS)co-PIs: Arjun Dey & Buell Jannuzi

  • Deep optical and NIR survey of two 9.3 sq. deg. fields

    • Boötes Field (NGPDWS) – North Galactic Pole

    • Cetus Field – Roughly 30 degrees from SGP

    • KPNO and CTIO 4-meters, MOSAIC

  • Survey detection limits (5σ):

    • BW, R, I – AB=26

    • J,H,K – AB = ~21

  • Survey Status

    • All data obtained

    • Boötes field public release in October 2004: BWRIK images, single-band and matched catalogs


Galex observations of bootes
GALEX Observations of Bootes Galaxies from z=0 to 1

  • GALEX Coverage of Boötes field

    • DIS (AB = 25 in NUV, FUV) 9 sq. deg. (not yet complete)

    • UDIS (AB = 26 in NUV, FUV) 1 sq. deg.

      (soon will have 90,000 seconds!)

    • DSS (AB = 22.5-24) 1 sq. deg.

  • Additional U-band data in Boötes field (GALEX/NDWFS collaboration)

    • Entire field imaged to AB=25

    • 1 sq. deg. imaged to AB=26

  • Observations planned or taken with Chandra, Spitzer, VLA FIRST, Redshifts from MMT Hectospec (AGES), Gemini GMOS


Steidel et al. 2003 Galaxies from z=0 to 1


GALEX-NDWFS 2 color diagram Galaxies from z=0 to 1


GALEX-NDWFS 2 color diagram Galaxies from z=0 to 1


Galex ndwfs science
GALEX-NDWFS Science Galaxies from z=0 to 1

Star Formation and Extinction Properties of Galaxies at z=1 and 2

  • Once high-z populations are isolated, derive LF, extinction corrections, corrected LF, SFR density to compare with z≥3

  • Need better redshifts than dropout technique

  • Spitzer IRAC data to improve SEDs for photo-z, and MIPS data to compare UV/FIR

  • Use Lyman break in DSS to isolate z~0.6 sample

    Investigation of Galaxies at Intermediate Redshifts in the AGES sample

  • Redshifts and multiwavelength data for galaxies with I<20

  • NIR + Optical + UV spectral evolution modeling, following to Salim et al. (2004)


Ultraviolet luminous galaxies uvlgs
Ultraviolet Luminous Galaxies (UVLGs) Galaxies from z=0 to 1

  • First sample described in Heckman et al. (2005)

  • Matched GALEX All-Sky Imaging Survey IR0.2 with SDSS DR1 galaxies (Seibert et al. 2005)

    • 74 “UV luminous” galaxies (LFUV>2×1010 L๏)between 0.1<z<0.3

      [L* = 4×109L๏ at z=0 (Wyder et al. 2005), L* = 6×1010L๏ at z=3 (Arnouts et al. 2005)]

    • Co-moving density 10-5 Mpc-3 (>100× less than LBGs at z=3)

    • Additional properties (metallicities, age indicators, SFRs, stellar mass, etc.)

      • SDSS value-added catalogs (www.mpa-garching.mpg.de/SDSS)*

      • Spectral evolution modeling by Salim et al. (2005)

  • Recently increased sample to 204 using DR2 and IR0.9

    *see Kauffmann et al. 2004, Brinchmann et al. 2004, Tremonti et al. 2004


Structural properties
Structural Properties Galaxies from z=0 to 1

FUV Luminosity vs. Half-light Radius

  • UVLGs span a large range in size

    • No correlation between LFUV and size

    • Strong correlation between IFUV and stellar mass

  • “Large” UVLGs (IFUV<108 L๏ kpc-2)

    • Massive (log M*=10.5 – 11.3)

    • High-mass disk systems with young stellar population

  • “Compact” UVLGs (IFUV>108 L๏ kpc-2)

    • Low mass (log M*=9.5 – 10.7)

    • Mass range similar to LBGs

(L๏/kpc2)

(kpc)

(L๏)


Structural properties1
Structural Properties Galaxies from z=0 to 1

FUV Surface Brightness vs. Stellar Mass

  • UVLGs span a large range in size

    • No correlation between LFUV and size

    • Strong correlation between IFUV and stellar mass

  • “Large” UVLGs (IFUV<108 L๏ kpc-2)

    • Massive (log M*=10.5 – 11.3)

    • High-mass disk systems with young stellar population

  • “Compact” UVLGs (IFUV>108 L๏ kpc-2)

    • Low mass (log M*=9.5 – 10.7)

    • Mass range similar to LBGs

(L๏ kpc-2)

Compact

Large

(M๏)


Compact uvlgs
Compact UVLGs Galaxies from z=0 to 1


Large uvlg sdss j010126 56 133245 5
Large UVLG: SDSS J010126.56+133245.5 Galaxies from z=0 to 1

FUV

NUV


Compact uvlg sdss j005527 45 002148 6
Compact UVLG: SDSS J005527.45-002148.6 Galaxies from z=0 to 1

FUV

NUV


Population comparison slide courtesy c martin large uvlgs compact uvlgs lbgs
Population Comparison Galaxies from z=0 to 1(slide courtesy C. Martin)Large UVLGs, Compact UVLGS, LBGs

M*

Log LUV

Log rUV

AUV

Log b

[O/H]

12

1.5

12

3

2

9

11

1

11

2

1

8.5

10

0.5

10

1

0

8

9

9

9

0

-1

7.5


What s next for uvlgs
What’s next for UVLGs? Galaxies from z=0 to 1

(Multiwavelength Analysis of UVLGPOPulation!)

  • Larger sample from SDSS DR3 and GR1

  • ACS/NICMOS imaging of a subsample

    • Morphologies

    • Presence of older stars

  • Spitzer FIR

  • Chandra


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