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Early days in a placement. Module three: Pre service training. Re-cap of Module two: Understanding the past for a child or young person. Learning Outcomes At the end of this module participants will be able to: Understand the developmental stages of childhood and adolescence

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Early days in a placement
Early days in a placement

Module three: Pre service training


Re cap of module two understanding the past for a child or young person
Re-cap of Module two: Understanding the past for a child or young person

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this module participants will be able to:

  • Understand the developmental stages of childhood and adolescence

  • Understand the experience of abuse and how it impacts on children

  • Understand what attachment means for a child, and how separation impacts on attachment

  • Identify the variety of losses that may be experienced by children who come into care and by birth family members

  • Understand and respond to challenging behaviours.

    Content

    1. Stages of development

    2. Responding to Attachment

    3. The longing to belong – loss and grief reactions

    4. The experience of abuse

    5. Responding to challenging of behaviours.

2


Module three early days in a placement
Module three: Early days in a placement young person

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this module participants will be able to:

1. Demonstrate understanding of the framework for decision making in meeting a child or young person’s protective needs.

2. Discuss the factors that would be taken into consideration in deciding whether to accept a placement.

3. Outline key factors in building a relationship with a child or young person.

4. Demonstrate knowledge of ways to encourage a child or young person’s sense of self and identity.

5. Demonstrate understanding of advocacy for children and young people.

3


Module three early days in a placement1
Module three: Early days in a placement young person

Content

  • Accepting a Placement – what do I need to know and consider?

  • Building Relationships – how to welcome a child or young person.

  • Decision Making about how to meet a child or young persons needs.

  • Promoting a positive sense of self and identity for a child or young person.

  • Advocacy for children and young people.

4


Activity
Activity young person

If your own child, or a child who is special to you (niece, nephew or child of close friend) had to live with someone else for a period of time:

  • What would you expect the carer to provide for your child?

  • How would you as a family expect to interact with your child while they were being cared for by someone else?

  • What decisions would you be happy to let the carer make and what would you like to retain control over?

5


Accepting a placement what you need to know and consider
Accepting a placement – what you need to know and consider young person

√ Can I meet the Charter of Rights, Principles of the Act and Statement of Standards?

Briefly review the Charter of Rights and Principles of the Act

Carefully consider each of the Statement of Standards provided to you

Note down one way you could meet each Statement of Standard

Are there any challenges you might face in meeting any of the Statement

of Standards

Discuss your answers or provide solutions to challenges

6


Accepting a placement what to consider
Accepting a placement – what to consider young person

Brainstorm

  • What information do you think you may need before accepting a placement?

7


Accepting a placement what you need to know and consider1
Accepting a placement – what you need to know and consider young person

√ Is this the right time for my family and the child?

√ Is the placement intended to be emergency/short term/long term?

√What order is the child on?

√ Is this the child’s first experience of being cared for away from home?

√ What is the goal for this child or young person?

√ How will you interact with the child or young person’s family?

√ Need to seek advice from the worker and your support person who knows your family and situation, to enable you to make an informed decision.

√ Discuss with your partner and family first before making a decision. Consider the needs of your own family including physical and emotional space, safety factors.

√ Does the child have any challenging behaviours or health needs?

8


Accepting a placement what you need to know and consider summary
Accepting a placement – what you need to know and consider, summary

  • Consider the Statement of Standards, Charter of Rights, Principles of the Act

  • Consider the timing for your family – exams, holidays, family commitments

  • Consider why the child has entered care and whether this impacts on their behaviour and any disciplinary methods

  • Consider the placement carefully, a placement breakdown can increase the pain, suffering, hurt and feelings of rejection for a child in care

  • Prepare your family – how long, confidentiality, house rules

  • Discuss any of your support needs or services that assist with this particular child in your placement agreement

9


Placement agreement
Placement Agreement consider, summary

A written agreement must occur between a carer and Child Safety Services when a child is placed in out of home care (Section 84 of the Child Protection Act 1999)

Outlines the relevant information known about the child

  • special health needs

  • behavioural management needs

  • contact for child with family

  • financial assistance requirements

    Records the agreed supports and services for carers.

  • resources to help meet the special needs of the child

    Records the responsibilities of Child Safety Services and the carer about the provision of medical, therapeutic, schooling or other services to the child.

10


Welcome a child
Welcome a child consider, summary

  • Think about how you would feel being placed with a stranger

  • Welcome and introduce the child to everyone in the house

  • Tell them about the house, pets and the household rules

  • Acknowledge their feelings

  • Listen carefully and use open ended questions

  • Don’t minimise their concerns or worries

  • Help the child explore answers to their own questions

  • Talk to them about contact with their family

  • Set aside time regularly for undivided attention with the child

11


Confidentiality provisions
Confidentiality Provisions consider, summary

Respecting confidentiality is another way to build trust with a child.

Maintaining confidentiality is part of your responsibility and a requirement in the Child Protection Act 1999, even after the child has left your care.

The Act states that information or a document is not to be disclosed or given to anyone else except:

  • To carry out duties or functionsunder the Child Protection Act 1999 – e.g. a CSO can share information with a carer about a child or young person when a placement begins as this information is necessary for the carer to carry out their role.

  • If the disclosure isnecessary for a child or young person’s protection or welfare – e.g. if a child is distressed after family contact, the carer can provide limited information about the family contact to the child’s teacher so that the teacher can provide support to the child at school. During the development, implementation or revision of a case plan.

  • The information is about the person who is asking – the child

12


Confidentiality provisions1
Confidentiality provisions consider, summary

The Act prohibits the publication of information that would lead to the identification of a child in out-of-home care:

  • Facebook and Myspace

  • Media

  • Posting photos on social networking sites

  • Linking carer sites with children in out-of-home care sites

Ask yourself, is sharing this really relevant to the care, protection and wellbeing of the child. If you have any doubts do not share the information and ask a CSO or F&KC worker.

13


Decision making
Decision Making consider, summary

  • Decisions relate to the type of order, the case plan goals/actions and the activities the child is involved.

  • A range of people can be involved in decision making - the parents, child, family, Child Safety Officer, community members, Recognised Entity and the carer

  • Decisions about day to day care of the child relate to custody matters.

  • Decisions about the significant long term welfare and development of the child relate to guardianship matters.

14


Case management and case planning
Case consider, summaryManagement and Case Planning

  • Case management = the coordination of services and individuals to meet the needs of the child. The CSO is responsible for case management.

  • Case plan = a written document that outlines all the activities, discussions, family contact and people involved to meet the child’s needs. The parents, child, carers, CSO, service providers, family members and other relevant people are responsible for actions and outcomes in the case plan.

15


Key components of a case plan for children implications for carers
Key components of a case plan for children – implications for carers

Education Support Plan(ESP)

A joint plan between Department of Education and Training and Child Safety Services. Carers support actions in the plan, assist with the child’s learning and attend ESP meetings.

Cultural Support Plan (CSP)

Required for every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child. Can be for other cultural backgrounds. Carers will support and engage in cultural connections, identity and activities outlined in the cultural support plan.

Child Health Passport

Some children require medical and therapeutic assistance. Carers may be required to assist with appointments and follow-up.

Contact with family

Family contact is critical for children in care. Contact arrangements, risks and frequency will be identified in the case plan. Carers assist with contact arrangements and feedback on the impacts for the child. Some carers participate in the contact with family and provide support and guidance.

16


Decision making and the carers role
Decision making and the carers role for carers

  • Participate in the family group meeting and any case plan reviews

  • Provide information on the child’s needs, health, education and cultural requirements

  • Assist with any actions in the case plan and report outcomes

  • Check if decisions you are making are in the best interest of the child

  • Check if decisions you make are consistent with the Statement of Standards, Principles of the Act and Charter of Rights

  • Check whether the parents have already made a decision

  • Check the level of decision making -custody or guardianship and what this covers

  • Consult with a CSO if there are costs involved or activities that are high risk

17


Decisions you could make for the child or young person
Decisions for carersyou could make for the child or young person

Daily Routine

  • bed time

  • meal time

  • home work

  • low risk activities

    Medical

  • Medical attention for a common illness; cold

  • Medical or dental treatment when a general anaesthetic is not required

  • Continued or other health treatments for established conditions, unless the medical practitioner is proposing a new treatment

  • Diagnostic tests or X–rays for new conditions

  • A second medical opinion (but you alone can not act on it)

  • hair cuts

  • clothing

  • make up and piercing

  • (consider the child’s view on the above list)

18


Decisions you could make for the child or young person cont
Decisions for carersyou could make for the child or young person (cont).

Education

  • Child care arrangements

  • Signing school reports

  • Participation in sport and recreational activities that are low to moderate risk

  • Variations to school routine including participation in day excursions that are low to moderate risk and not involving interstate travel

  • Participation in curriculum-related activities including swimming, arts council performances and religious education that are consistent with the views of the child and the family.

19


Decisions that can only be made by child safety
Decisions that can for carersonly be made by Child Safety

Medical

  • Immunisations

  • Blood tests

  • Major medical and surgical procedures or examinations

  • Blood transfusions

  • Testing to determine parentage (DNA testing)

  • Pregnancy termination

  • Contraception

  • Acting on a second medical opinion

  • Prescribed medications to manage behaviour or mental health conditions (eg. Anti-depressants, dexamphetamines.

20


Decision that can only be made by child safety
Decision that can for carersonly be made by Child Safety

Police Interviews

  • Children cannot be interviewed by the Police unless:

    • The child has had the opportunity to speak to a support person

    • The support person is present during the interview

21


Low to moderate activities
Low to moderate activities for carers

Higher risk activities

  • Rock climbing

  • Abseiling

  • Go-karts

  • Motorbikes

  • Parachuting

  • Hang gliding

  • Bungy jumping

  • Scuba diving

  • Approved school sports

  • Riding a bike or skateboard

  • Rides at theme parks

22


Risk to child and carers assessment
Risk to Child and Carers Assessment for carers

  • By law carer details are to be provided to the parents.

  • Child Safety Services undertake a risk assessment about the level of information able to be provided to the parents and the risk to the child, carer and carer’s family if carer details are provided.

  • Where significant risk to the safety of the child or anyone else with whom the child is living the details may be withheld.

  • Where you have concerns speak with a CSO, foster or kinship care worker or a FAST delegate.

23


Promoting a positive sense of self and identity
Promoting a positive sense of self and identity for carers

  • Encourage positive interdependence in relationships

  • Encourage children and young people to find solutions to problems themselves

  • Develop positive life stories with children and young people

  • Build on strengths and interests

  • Expand the child or young persons networks, cultural and community connections

  • Promote family based problem solving

  • Assist with developing positive communication skills

24


Advocacy
Advocacy for carers

  • How do you advocate for your own child?

    • School, health, Dr’s, sport, conflict resolution

  • At Child Safety Services

    • Case plan reviews, services, activities, cultural events, family contact

  • Other services

    • Foster Care Queensland, Create, CCYPCG

  • Complaints process

    • CSO, Team leader, Manager, Child Safety Complaints Unit

    • CCYCPG, QCAT, Ombudsman

25


Community visitor program ccypcg
Community Visitor Program (CCYPCG) for carers

The Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian provide the Community Visitor Program for children in out-of-home care.

Community Visitors (CVs) are employed by the Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian on a part-time basis to visit children and young people in out-of-home care.

CVs check that children are provided with appropriate standards of care and advocate on their behalf.

26


Activity revise responses
Activity – revise responses for carers

If your own child, or a child who is special to you (niece, nephew or child of close friend) had to live with someone else for a period of time:

  • What would you expect the carer to provide for your child?

  • How would you as a family expect to interact with that child while they were being cared for by someone else?

  • What decisions would you be happy to let the carer make and what would you like to retain control over?

27


Module three early days in a placement2
Module three: Early days in a placement for carers

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this module participants will be able to:

1. Demonstrate an understanding of the framework for decision making in meeting a child or young person’s protective needs.

2. Discuss the factors that would be taken into consideration in deciding whether to accept a placement.

3. Outline key factors in building a relationship with a child or young person.

4. Demonstrate knowledge of ways to encourage a child or young person’s sense of self and identity.

5. Demonstrate understanding of advocacy for children and young people.

28


Thank you for carers


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