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Case Study: Data Diary 1. Sarah Working with Kat and Kelly. Student Background. “High” Students “Jen” – 5 th grade, English Only, Current SRI ( Lexile ) of 450 “Jessica” – 4 th grade, English Only, Current SRI of 451 “Dan” – 4 th , English Only, Current SRI of 450.

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case study data diary 1

Case Study: Data Diary 1

Sarah

Working with Kat and Kelly

student background
Student Background

“High” Students

“Jen” – 5th grade, English Only, Current SRI (Lexile) of 450

“Jessica” – 4th grade, English Only, Current SRI of 451

“Dan” – 4th, English Only, Current SRI of 450

student background continued
Student Background, Continued

“Lower” Students

“Emma” – 4th grade, EL, Current SRI 336 (from a BR (86) at the beginning of the year)

“Larry” – 6th grade, EL, Current SRI 306 (all scores this school year have been around this score)

“Andy” – 5th grade, EL, Current SRI BR (0)

confidence scale
Confidence Scale

Independent Work Confidence Scale

1 - I don\'t feel confident at all and don’t think I can pass a Reading Counts quiz after reading a book by myself.

2- I only feel a little confident taking a Reading Counts quiz after reading a book by myself.

3 - I feel okay about taking a Reading Counts Quiz after reading a book by myself.

4 - I feel fairly confident about taking a Reading Counts quiz after reading a book by myself.

5 - I feel very confident and I know I can pass a Reading Counts quiz after reading a book by myself.

Rate yourself.

1 2 3 4 5

confidence scale results how students rated themselves
Confidence Scale Results: How students rated themselves

Higher Students

Lower Students

  • Jen – 5
  • Jessica – 5
  • Dan – 3
  • Emma – 4
  • Larry – 3
  • Andy – 5
observation notes lower
Observation Notes (lower)

Emma –

  • 3/5/12– cleaning out folder, one page at a time, walking each page to trash; picking at the carpet; talking to nearby peer; looking at me while I teach small group, smiling at me, not reading or working; staring at things; interrupted my small group to tell me one of her papers got ripped; I redirected her to go back and work on her independent work (reading or working on the worksheet); after 5 minutes, she finally started to get to work
  • 3/7/12 –playing with pencil box; I took the pencil box away and had her sit in a chair instead of on the floor
  • 3/9/12 – looking at me, looking around the room, bouncing book off the floor; after 5 minutes, she opens book but continues to look at me and around the room over her book
  • 3/12/12 – rolling around on the floor, not really working; I gave her a chair to sit in and reminded her to get to work 4 times before she finally started working
observation notes lower1
Observation Notes (lower)

Larry –

  • 3/5/12 –sits on floor just out of sight and hides his face behind book; I asked him to move to his designated spot (so I could actually see him); appears to be working; picks and plays with carpet; talks to nearby peer (I redirected him); lying on floor, rolling around, trying to talk to nearby peer
  • 3/7/12–reading, working on worksheet
  • 3/13/12 –reminded to get back to work; looking at shoes; trying to talk to nearby peer
  • 3/14/12 –spent 6 minutes tying shoes and playing with his shoes; I had him “clip down” and told him to get to work; hides face behind book but keeps looking at me over the top
observation notes lower2
Observation Notes (lower)

Andy –

  • 3/15/12 – lies on floor reading; reads out loud (not so loud it was distracting others, but I could hear his voice); lies on floor to work on worksheet
  • 3/19/12 – lies on floor reading; reads out loud (in a quiet voice)
  • 3/21/12 – lies on bean bag reading; reads out loud (very loud, even after I asked him to read in a quieter voice); continues to read so loudly, I have him “clip down;” he reads silently now; works quietly on worksheet; at the end of his independent group time, he proudly tells me he passed a quiz yesterday (I was out; there was a sub)
observation notes higher
Observation Notes (higher)

Dan –

  • 3/5 –paper airplane; appears to be reading; interrupts small group to ask a question that he already knows the answer to
  • *overall, interrupts small group several times a week
observation notes higher1
Observation Notes (higher)

Jessica –

  • 3/5/12 – appears to be reading, working on worksheet
  • 3/7/12 – appears to be reading, working
  • 3/13/12 – sits in chair, reading the whole time
  • 3/14/12 – reading, turns worksheet into basket, takes quiz (tells me she passes!)
observation notes higher2
Observation Notes (higher)

Jen –

  • 3/5 – appears to be reading, working on worksheet
  • *overall, very seldom redirected for talking during independent time
interview data lower
Interview Data (lower)

Emma

  • 1. When a book has pictures, do you look through all of the pictures before reading the book? -no, I just start reading the book, I don’t read the title. I read the title when I pick the book
  • 2. When you read a book, what do you do when something is difficult to understand (If you get stuck)? What do you do to figure it out? –if I don’t know the word I sound it out. Teacher prompted her to think about reading something difficult, not trying to sound out a word, but reading something that doesn’t make sense to her and she said – I reread it over and over and try to understand it
  • 3. What do you think about when you read a story? –I think about my sister (she giggles). Teacher prompted her to think about it a little more, she said – like judging the book, if it’s good or bad
  • 4. Is it easy or hard to remember what happens in a story? Why? –it’s hard to remember, I don’t remember some things that’s happened and then I have to go back and look in the story
  • 5. What do you do to help you understand the story? I read it two times
  • 6. How do you try to remember what you read? –I go back again
  • 7. Do you take any notes or write anything down while you are reading? -no
  • 8. Do you look at/read the worksheet before reading the book? -no
  • 9. When you answer the questions on the worksheet, do you go back and read parts of the book to help you? –yes, sometimes
  • 10. When you take the Reading Counts quiz, do you go back and look in the book to help you? – yes, sometimes
  • 11. What do you think about working with a partner during your independent group time? Why? –Great. If I don’t know a word or need help I could tell them if they could help me
  • 12. Who do you think would make a good partner? Why? –Stan, he’s smart. Teacher asks what makes him smart, she said –he’s passing all the books; -Jessica because she doesn’t talk and goof around when she’s working
interview data lower1
Interview Data (lower)

Andy

  • 1. When a book has pictures, do you look through all of the pictures before reading the book? –yea, I look through all the pictures
  • 2. When you read a book, what do you do when something is difficult to understand (If you get stuck)? What do you do to figure it out? –I sound it out. Teacher prompted him to think about reading something that doesn’t make sense, not just reading a difficult word, he said – try to understand it. Teacher asked what he might to do try to understand it, he said –I don’t know, try to understand it.
  • 3. What do you think about when you read a story? –what kind of story is it, like mystery or something; if any stories I’ve read are the same
  • 4. Is it easy or hard to remember what happens in a story? Why? –medium; sometimes I try to remember and I can’t really remember
  • 5. What do you do to help you understand the story? –read it again
  • 6. How do you try to remember what you read? –look through the book again
  • 7. Do you take any notes or write anything down while you are reading? –Yea, sometimes I take notes while I read like if I do the worksheet and read the book at the same time. Teacher asks if he takes notes on what he is reading or if he writes the answers to questions from the worksheet, he said –answers the questions on the worksheet
  • 8. Do you look at/read the worksheet before reading the book? –I like to do both at the same time, like looking at the worksheet while reading
  • 9. When you answer the questions on the worksheet, do you go back and read parts of the book to help you? –yes
  • 10. When you take the Reading Counts quiz, do you go back and look in the book to help you? –yes, only if I’m not sure
  • 11. What do you think about working with a partner during your independent group time? Why? –It would be okay. Not good or bad, just okay.
  • 12. Who do you think would make a good partner? Why? -Jeff or Joe because they’re my friends and can help out (as he is smiling and almost laughing. Teacher is lead to believe he said these particular students because they are his friends and he wants to work with them rather than thinking about who might make a good partner)
interview data lower2
Interview Data (lower)

Larry

  • 1. When a book has pictures, do you look through all of the pictures before reading the book? –yea, I look through it
  • 2. When you read a book, what do you do when something is difficult to understand (If you get stuck)? What do you do to figure it out? –Sound the word out or reread it
  • 3. What do you think about when you read a story? –If there is a problem in the story, I think about the problem and what is happening, or I think about the setting, like I picture what happens
  • 4. Is it easy or hard to remember what happens in a story? Why? –Some easy, some hard, depending on the book
  • 5. What do you do to help you understand the story? –like drawing, I draw pictures of what happens. When I read the Flea and His Dog story, I drew a picture of a dog and a flea on a dog, and when I read Torch Runner, I drew Danny running and the torch. (Teacher asks where he draws the pictures, he said –like on my notebook with the eraser so I can see it and then I wipe it off).
  • 6. How do you try to remember what you read? –sometimes I draw
  • 7. Do you take any notes or write anything down while you are reading? –sometimes, like if I am reading at home and something is interesting, I put a sticky note on that page and write what is interesting
  • 8. Do you look at/read the worksheet before reading the book? –Yes, to know what to look for
  • 9. When you answer the questions on the worksheet, do you go back and read parts of the book to help you? –Yes
  • 10. When you take the Reading Counts quiz, do you go back and look in the book to help you? –Yes
  • 11. What do you think about working with a partner during your independent group time? Why? –A partner might be distracting because you’d be talking; -not a friend, but someone to help remember story parts
  • 12. Who do you think would make a good partner? Why? –someone who listens (he couldn’t think of anyone to name)
interview data higher
Interview Data (higher)

Dan

  • 1. When a book has pictures, do you look through all of the pictures before reading the book? –I just read it
  • 2. When you read a book, what do you do when something is difficult to understand (If you get stuck)? What do you do to figure it out? –Look through the book or sound it out
  • 3. What do you think about when you read a story? (he shrugs his shoulders) Teacher prompts him again and he shrugs his shoulders again
  • 4. Is it easy or hard to remember what happens in a story? Why? –both, I don’t know (shrugs shoulders)
  • 5. What do you do to help you understand the story? –Read it two or three times
  • 6. How do you try to remember what you read? –looking back in it
  • 7. Do you take any notes or write anything down while you are reading? –no
  • 8. Do you look at/read the worksheet before reading the book? –no
  • 9. When you answer the questions on the worksheet, do you go back and read parts of the book to help you? –Yes
  • 10. When you take the Reading Counts quiz, do you go back and look in the book to help you? –yes
  • 11. What do you think about working with a partner during your independent group time? Why? –No because they would talk and play around. Teacher asks how working with a partner could be a good thing, he said – helping each other with words and learning from each other
  • 12. Who do you think would make a good partner? Why? –Stan because he is quiet and reads
interview data higher1
Interview Data (higher)

Jessica

  • 1. When a book has pictures, do you look through all of the pictures before reading the book? –I read the title and then just read it
  • 2. When you read a book, what do you do when something is difficult to understand (If you get stuck)? What do you do to figure it out? –I skip it or try to sound it out (Teacher prompts her to think about reading something difficult or that doesn’t make sense, not just sounding out a difficult word, she says –go back and reread it).
  • 3. What do you think about when you read a story? –about that character and what they are doing
  • 4. Is it easy or hard to remember what happens in a story? Why? – hard
  • 5. What do you do to help you understand the story? –think about the character and what they are doing
  • 6. How do you try to remember what you read? –picturing it in my mind, like picturing what is happening
  • 7. Do you take any notes or write anything down while you are reading? –No
  • 8. Do you look at/read the worksheet before reading the book? –no
  • 9. When you answer the questions on the worksheet, do you go back and read parts of the book to help you? –no, not really
  • 10. When you take the Reading Counts quiz, do you go back and look in the book to help you? –yes, sometimes (Teacher prompts when? She says –when I’m not sure about an answer)
  • 11. What do you think about working with a partner during your independent group time? Why? -*two thumbs up* -Good. He or she can help do the worksheet and you can learn good behavior.
  • 12. Who do you think would make a good partner? Why? –Stan, Jennie, or Larry because they are good kids. They don’t get in trouble and they do good deeds. They are good kids.
interview reflections
Interview Reflections
  • Question #2. When you read a book, what do you do when something is difficult to understand (If you get stuck)? What do you do to figure it out?
  • Dan
  • Rereading
  • Partners
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