“The Negro is the key to the whole situation, the pivot upon which the whole rebellion turns…. T...
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“The Negro is the key to the whole situation, the pivot upon which the whole rebellion turns…. This war, disguise it as they may, is virtually nothing more or less than perpetual slavery against universal freedom.” Frederick Douglass.

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“The Negro is the key to the whole situation, the pivot upon which the whole rebellion turns…. This war, disguise it as they may, is virtually nothing more or less than perpetual slavery against universal freedom.” Frederick Douglass


“The arm of the slaves is the best defense against the arm of the slaveholder. Who would be free themselves must strike the blow...I urge you to fly to arms and smite to death the power that would bury the government and your liberty in the same hopeless grave.” Frederick Douglass


“I have given the subject of arming the Negro my hearty support. This, with the emancipation of the Negro, is the heaviest blow yet given the Confederacy…. By arming the Negro we have added a powerful ally. They will make good soldiers and taking them from the enemy weakens him in the same proportion they strengthen us.” Ulysses S. Grant


King cotton diplomacy
King Cotton Diplomacy support. This, with the emancipation of the Negro, is the heaviest blow yet given the Confederacy…. By arming the Negro we have added a powerful ally. They will make good soldiers and taking them from the enemy weakens him in the same proportion they strengthen us.” Ulysses S. Grant

  • An attempt to blackmail Britain or France to recognize the Confederacy as a nation


Process
Process support. This, with the emancipation of the Negro, is the heaviest blow yet given the Confederacy…. By arming the Negro we have added a powerful ally. They will make good soldiers and taking them from the enemy weakens him in the same proportion they strengthen us.” Ulysses S. Grant

  • Create an artificial cotton shortage


Process1
Process support. This, with the emancipation of the Negro, is the heaviest blow yet given the Confederacy…. By arming the Negro we have added a powerful ally. They will make good soldiers and taking them from the enemy weakens him in the same proportion they strengthen us.” Ulysses S. Grant

  • Create an artificial cotton shortage

  • Leads to higher unemployment in Britain & France


Process2
Process support. This, with the emancipation of the Negro, is the heaviest blow yet given the Confederacy…. By arming the Negro we have added a powerful ally. They will make good soldiers and taking them from the enemy weakens him in the same proportion they strengthen us.” Ulysses S. Grant

  • Create an artificial cotton shortage

  • Leads to higher unemployment in Britain & France

  • Unemployment leads to an increase in social problems such as crime, prostitution, etc.

  • These problems will force Britain and France to recognize the Confederacy and thus resume cotton shipments


Reasons for failure
Reasons for Failure support. This, with the emancipation of the Negro, is the heaviest blow yet given the Confederacy…. By arming the Negro we have added a powerful ally. They will make good soldiers and taking them from the enemy weakens him in the same proportion they strengthen us.” Ulysses S. Grant

  • Egyptian cotton was abundant.

  • British and French crop failures forced them to import Union wheat.

  • British and French working classes willing to suffer if it meant the end of slavery in the United States.


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