Dissociative and Personality Disorders  Module 50

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Which of the following is an example of dissociation?. Realizing that, although your eyes have been following the page, you have no idea what you just read because you were thinking about something else.Having a false belief that you are someone else.Developing symptoms of schizophrenia.Having em

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Dissociative and Personality Disorders Module 50

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1. 1 Dissociative and Personality Disorders Module 50

2. Which of the following is an example of dissociation? Realizing that, although your eyes have been following the page, you have no idea what you just read because you were thinking about something else. Having a false belief that you are someone else. Developing symptoms of schizophrenia. Having emotional highs and lows.

3. 3 Depersonalization Disorder Conscious awareness becomes separated (dissociated) from previous memories, thoughts, and feelings. OBJECTIVE 49-1| Describe the symptoms of dissociative disorders, and explain why some critics are skeptical about dissociative identity disorder.OBJECTIVE 49-1| Describe the symptoms of dissociative disorders, and explain why some critics are skeptical about dissociative identity disorder.

4. Dissociative Fugue Dissociative Fugue: Sudden, unexpected travel away from home and assumption of a new identity Occurs only in the presence of an extreme stressor While in the “Fugue State,” the individual has no memory for his former identity. After a period of time, (hours, days, years), the person may “recover,” and return to his former identity – having no memory for time in the Fugue State. Extremely rare, controversial, and poorly studied. Fugue state involves leaving work and family and assuming a new identity - the person forgets their past and previous identity Fugue state involves leaving work and family and assuming a new identity - the person forgets their past and previous identity

5. 5 Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) Is a disorder in which a person exhibits two or more distinct and alternating personalities formerly called multiple personality disorder.

6. 6 DID Critics Critics argue that diagnosis of DID has increased in the late 20th century. Also DID has not been found in other countries. There is some debate about whether dissociative identity disorder actually or occurs, though it is included in the DSM. It is extremely rare and symptoms are ego-dystonic (distressing to person) - personalities have amnesia for the actions and experiences of other personalities (interpersonality amnesia) There is some debate about whether dissociative identity disorder actually or occurs, though it is included in the DSM. It is extremely rare and symptoms are ego-dystonic (distressing to person) - personalities have amnesia for the actions and experiences of other personalities (interpersonality amnesia)

7. Which of the following is FALSE? Dissociative Identity Disorder was formerly called “Multiple Personality Disorder.” Dissociative Identity Disorder involves dissociating to an abnormal level, decreasing functionality. Dissociative Identity Disorder is controversial. Dissociative Identity Disorder is the same as Schizophrenia.

8. 8 Personality Disorders Characterized by inflexible and enduring behavior patterns that impair social functioning. Usually without anxiety, depression, or delusions. OBJECTIVE 49-2| Contrast the three clusters of personality disorders, and describe the behaviors and brain activity associated with antisocial personality disorders.OBJECTIVE 49-2| Contrast the three clusters of personality disorders, and describe the behaviors and brain activity associated with antisocial personality disorders.

9. Henrietta must be the center of attention, and is constantly involved in emotional drama. If she is this way most of the time and has been this way for much of her adult life, her diagnosis is probably: Borderline Personality Disorder Narcissistic Personality Disorder Schizotypal Personality Disorder Histrionic Personality Disorder

10. Frank must wash his hand 8 hours a day. Hank creates schedules for everyone else to follow and must have everything his way. Which diagnoses are correct? Frank – OCPD; Hank – OCD Frank – OCD; Hank – OCPD Frank – DID; Hank – OCPD Frank – APD; Hank - BPD

11. Low levels of anxiety are most characteristic of: A. antisocial personality disorder. B. dissociative identity disorder. C. obsessive-compulsive disorder. D. paranoid schizophrenia.

12. 12 Antisocial Personality Disorder Disorder in which the person (usually men) exhibits a lack of conscience for wrongdoing, even towards friends and family members. Formerly called sociopath or psychopath.

13. 13 Understanding Antisocial Personality Disorder Like mood disorders and schizophrenia, antisocial personality disorder has biological and psychological reasons. Youngsters before committing crime respond with lower levels of stress hormones than do others their age. Graph above shows that in both stressful and nonstressful situation, those who were later convicted of a crime as 18 to 26 year olds showed relatively low arousal. Biological relatives of people with a fearless approach to life are at increased risk for APD. Even at ages 3 to 6, boys who later became aggressive or antisocial adolescents “tended to be impulsive, uninhibited, unconcerned with social rewards and low in anxiety”. When they await aversive events, like a shock or loud noise, they show little autonomic arousal – even when they are young. (540) Graph above shows that in both stressful and nonstressful situation, those who were later convicted of a crime as 18 to 26 year olds showed relatively low arousal. Biological relatives of people with a fearless approach to life are at increased risk for APD. Even at ages 3 to 6, boys who later became aggressive or antisocial adolescents “tended to be impulsive, uninhibited, unconcerned with social rewards and low in anxiety”. When they await aversive events, like a shock or loud noise, they show little autonomic arousal – even when they are young. (540)

14. 14 Understanding Antisocial Personality Disorder PET scans of 41 murderers revealed reduced activity in the frontal lobes. In a follow-up study repeat offenders had 11% less frontal lobe compared to normals (Raine et al., 1999; 2000). Raine (1999) found reduced activity in the murderers’ frontal lobes, which helps control impulses. Repeat violent criminals also have 11% less frontal lobe tissue than others. Raine (1999) found reduced activity in the murderers’ frontal lobes, which helps control impulses. Repeat violent criminals also have 11% less frontal lobe tissue than others.

15. 15 Understanding Antisocial Personality Disorder Probability of crime increases twice as much when childhood poverty is compounded with obstetrical complications (Raine et al., 1999; 2000).

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