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Phonics Workshop. October 2013. Agenda. What is phonics? Why phonics? Letters and sounds Phases in Letters and Sounds What does a phonics lesson look like? Techniques and games How can you help your child at home?. Bow or bow Read or read Tear or tear. What is phonics?.

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Phonics Workshop

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Phonics workshop

Phonics Workshop

October 2013


Agenda

Agenda

  • What is phonics?

  • Why phonics?

  • Letters and sounds

  • Phases in Letters and Sounds

  • What does a phonics lesson look like?

  • Techniques and games

  • How can you help your child at home?


Phonics workshop

Bow or bow

Read or read

Tear or tear


What is phonics

What is phonics?

  • Phonics is a way of teaching children to read quickly and skilfully. They are taught how to:

    • recognise the sounds that each individual letter makes;

    • identify the sounds that different combinations of letters make - such as ‘sh’ or ‘oo’; and

    • blend these sounds together from left to right to make a word.

  • Children can then use this knowledge to ‘de-code’ new words that they hear or see. This is the first important step in learning to read.


Why phonics

Why phonics?

  • Research shows that when phonics is taught in a structured way - starting with the easiest sounds and progressing through to the most complex – it is the most effective way of teaching young children to read. It is particularly helpful for children aged 5–7.

  • Almost all children who receive good teaching of phonics will learn the skills they need to tackle new words. They can then go on to read any kind of text fluently and confidently, and to read for enjoyment.

  • Children who have been taught phonics also tend to read more accurately than those taught using other methods, such as ‘look and say’. This includes children who find learning to read difficult, for example those who have dyslexia.


Letters and sounds

Letters and Sounds

  • Part of a broad and balanced curriculum

  • Starts by the age of 5

  • Multisensory

  • Time-limited

  • Systematic

  • Taught discretely and daily at a brisk pace

  • Opportunities to reinforce and apply knowledge and skills should be frequent and available across the curriculum

  • Children’s progress is carefully assessed and monitored

  • Stage not age


Phonics workshop

  • apply phonics skills and knowledge to recognise and spell an increasing number of complex words

  • are secure with less common grapheme/phoneme correspondence and recognise phonic irregularities

Colour codes

Phase 6

Preliminary work on general sounds and fun phonics

Children firmly in Phase 3 by end YR

  • can use various ways of pronouncing and spelling the graphemes corresponding to long vowel phonemes e.g. ay, ai, a-e play, pain

  • can read phonically decodable two and three syllable words

  • can spell complex words using phonically plausible attempts

Phase 5

Children firmly in Phase 5

by end of Y1

Beginning Y2 continuing into Y3

  • can blend adjacent consonants in words and apply this when reading unfamiliar texts

  • can segment adjacent consonants e.g. spoon, cried, nest

  • can read some polysyllabic words

Phase 4

Phase 1 continued

Awareness of rhyme and alliteration; distinguish between different environmental sounds and phonemes; explore and experiment with sounds and words

  • know one grapheme for each of 44 phonemes

  • know the letter names

  • hear and say sounds in order in which they occur in a word

  • read and spell a wide range of CVC words using all letters and less frequent consonant digraphs, double letters and some long vowel phonemes e.g. sheep, goat.

  • read two-syllable words and captions

Phase 3

  • know that words are constructed from phonemes and phonemes are represented by graphemes

  • know small selection of common consonants and vowels, can blend for reading and segment for spelling vc and cvc words e.g. pot, top, sat tap

Phase 2

  • show growing awareness and appreciation of rhyme, rhythm and alliteration

  • distinguish between different sounds in the environment and phonemes

  • explore and experiment with sounds and words, discriminating speech sounds in words

  • beginning to orally blend and segment phonemes

Phase 1

(7 Aspects)


Letters and sounds1

Letters and Sounds

  • 44 sounds or ‘phonemes’

  • 20 – vowel sounds

  • 24 – consonant sounds

  • Phoneme – smallest unit of sound in a word

  • Grapheme – the written form

  • Grapheme-Phoneme correspondance


Phonics workshop

A phoneme

Each letter will have...

A a

A letter name

A lower case

A capital

A grapheme


Phase one

Phase One

  • Central importance of developing teaching and listening skills.

  • Playing with sounds they hear

  • Syllables

  • Rhyme and alliteration

  • Silly soup


Phase two

Phase Two

  • Introduces 19 grapheme-phoneme correspondences

  • Pure Sounds!

  • Jolly phonics actions

    Set 1: s, a, t, p

    Set 2: i, n, m, d

    Set 3: g, o, c, k

    Set 4: ck, e, u, r

    Set 5: h, b, f, ff, l, ll, ss

  • As soon as children have a small number of grapheme/phoneme correspondences, blending and segmenting can start.


Phase two1

Phase Two

  • Grapheme-phoneme correspondence

    c/a/t = 3 phonemes

    th/e/n = 3 phonemes

    ch/air = 2 phonemes

  • Segment and blend


Phase two2

Phase Two

  • Letter names and capitals

  • Letter formation

    • Read, Write Inc cards


Phase three

Phase Three

  • Introduces the rest of the letters of the alphabet

    Set 6: j v w x

    Set 7: y z, zz qu

  • Key words – words that need to be learnt by sight.


Digraphs and trigraphs

Digraphs and Trigraphs

chchiparfarm

shshopor for

ththin/thenurhurt

ngring owcow

airain oicoin

eefeetear dear

ighnightair fair

oaboat uresure

ooboot/look ercorner


Phase four

Phase Four

  • Secure previous phases

  • CVCC and CCVC words

  • Adjacent consonants

yes

no

yes

yes

yes

no

yes


Phase five

Phase Five

  • Alternate graphemes for the same phoneme.


Phase five1

Phase Five

  • Split digraphs

    cakesame

    notejoke

    kitewhite

    assumegene

    By this stage when spelling children should be able to spell the word using letter names.


Phase six

Phase Six

  • Increasing fluency and accuracy in reading and writing

  • Throughout Year Two (although teaching of spelling continues well into KS2)


What does a phonics lesson look like

What does a phonics lesson look like?

Introduction

Revisit and review

Teach

Practise

Apply


Techniques and games

Techniques and Games

  • Silly soup

  • Robot talking

  • Phonics Fingers

  • Quick write

  • Stand up if...


Sound buttons

Sound buttons

pin


Sound buttons1

Sound buttons

moon


Sound buttons2

Sound Buttons

hat frog

coatfloat

nightchimpanzee

sheepadventure

saychain

3

4

3

4

8

3

7

3

3

2


Phoneme frames

Phoneme frames

u

s

n


Phoneme frames1

Phoneme frames

b

oa

t


Phoneme frames2

Phoneme frames

sh

or

t


Phonics workshop

k

i

ng

b

e

ll

p

qu

i

ck

sh

ee

th

or

n

ch

a

t


Yes no game

Yes/no game

Is rain wet?


Phonics workshop

Is it dark at night?


Phonics workshop

Can coins sing a song?


Phonics workshop

Are the teeth of a shark sharp?


Phonics workshop

Can a ship sail on the road?


Phonics workshop

Rubbish and treasure game


Magic line game

Magic Line Game


Full circle game

Full circle game


Phonics workshop

x

p

t

d

m

s

o

a


Phonics workshop

x

p

o

t

d

m

s

a


Phonics workshop

x

p

o

d

t

m

s

a


Phonics workshop

x

p

a

d

t

m

s

o


Phonics workshop

x

s

a

d

p

t

m

o


Phonics workshop

Full Circle Game 3

x

m

a

d

p

t

s

o


Phonics workshop

x

m

a

t

p

d

s

o


Phonics workshop

x

p

a

t

d

m

s

o


Phonics workshop

Full Circle Game 3

x

p

o

t


How can you help at home

How can you help at home?

Phonics works best when children are given plenty

of encouragement and learn to enjoy reading and

books. Parents play a very important part in helping

with this.

  • Pure sounds!!

  • Use the language from today’s session

  • Writing in lower case

  • c and k

  • Reading books that are phonetically plausible

  • Identify grapheme/phoneme correspondence in books

  • Play some of the games


Key words teaching remembering

Key WordsTeaching, remembering

Visual Memory:

Write the word in large letters for the children to see and ‘take a mental photograph of’ (probably display for about 10 seconds). Can they see the word when they close their eyes? (if not, repeat). Ask the children to write the words on their whiteboards. Check against original. Repeat regularly.

Best of 3

Display 3 words, 2 of which are incorrect.

e.g. about, abowt, abot

Which is right?

Using Shape

Sky write; link match words to shapes with handwriting; of words

Recognising:

Spotting: in the environment, in books, from word bank.

Key word bingo


W ebsites

Websites

  • Phonics play

    www.phonicsplay.co.uk/

  • BBC Words and Pictures

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/wordsandpictures

  • ICT games

    www.ictgames.com

  • Alphablocks

    www.bbc.co.uk/cbeebies/alphablocks

  • Lesley Clarke’s Website

    http://www.lesleyclarkesyntheticphonics.co.uk/


Phonics workshop

Questions?


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