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TRANSITION CONGRUENCY. JAMES H. KEELEY, DIRECTOR PENNSYLVANIA JUVENILE CORRECTIONAL EDUCATION 2004 TRANSITION CONFERENCE DECEMBER 8 & 9, 2004 SPONSORED BY NATIONAL EVALUATION AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CENTER EDUCATION OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH WHO ARE NEGELECTED AND DELILNQUENT, AND AT-RISK

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Transition congruency
TRANSITION CONGRUENCY

JAMES H. KEELEY, DIRECTOR

PENNSYLVANIA JUVENILE CORRECTIONAL EDUCATION

2004 TRANSITION CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 8 & 9, 2004

SPONSORED BY

NATIONAL EVALUATION AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CENTER

EDUCATION OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH WHO ARE NEGELECTED AND DELILNQUENT, AND AT-RISK

FOR

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Report available at: www.nicic.org, adapted for a juvenile transition project in Pennsylvania


Transition goals
TRANSITION GOALS

  • Provide HOPE for delinquent/at-risk youth

  • Increase Public Safety – Protecting the Community

  • Reduce Recidivism

  • Avoid New Victimization

  • Better Use of Resources

  • Provide opportunities for transformation

  • Increase Educational Achievement – Build Competencies

  • Increase Secondary Credential Acquisition

  • Increase Matriculation to Post Secondary Opportunities

  • Increase Employment Opportunities

  • Increase Community Participation as Crime Free Citizens


Student profile
STUDENT PROFILE

  • Average age: school – 16.3

    institution 17.5

  • Age range: 12 up to 21

  • Population: Daily 792

    Annual 1602

  • Gender: Male 93%, Female 7%


Student profile1
STUDENT PROFILE

  • Race: White – 30%,

    African American – 42%,

    Hispanic– 20%,

    Other -1%

  • Residence: Urban – 63%,

    Suburban – 16%, Rural 12%


Student profile2
STUDENT PROFILE

  • Academic Achievement:0 – 4th grade – 30%

    5th – 8th grade – 40%

    9th – 12th grade – 30%

  • Achievement deficit: 3 – 5 years below peers

  • Special Education Pre-Identified*

    01-02 = 49% 02-03 = 58%

    * 3 – 9 times greater than general population


Juvenile and adult releases
Juvenile and Adult Releases

  • 100,000 unconditional adult releases in 1999

  • 100,000 Juveniles Released Annually (Sickmund,2000))


The current transition process does not adequately protect the public
The Current Transition Process Does Not Adequately Protect the Public

We know how to operate effective interventions, but our ability to do so is hampered because residential, releasing, supervision, and human service agencies:

  • Have conflicting priorities

  • Lack continuity in their transition policies and practices

  • Do not share information

    There are too few effective interventions for released offenders

  • Placement requirements reduce delinquents’ incentives for programs

  • Programs have been cut to reduce costs

  • Legislated restrictions – Public housing, employment, welfare benefits, mandatory alternative education placement, student loans

    A growing number of offenders leave institutions at the end of long sentences with no supervision or services


Key agencies in transition reform
Key Agencies in Transition Reform the Public

Three agencies must take the lead in enabling Transition Reform in their jurisdictions:

  • Residential agency (which operates institutions)

  • Releasing authority – Juvenile Court (which makes release and revocation decisions)

  • Supervision agency (which monitors, offenders released from placements to the communities)

    These agencies must:

  • Obtain approval of political leaders to proceed with Transition Reform

  • Sell the concept to other stakeholders

  • Convene policy-level partnerships involving stakeholders


Pennsylvania s transition plan education residential history
Pennsylvania’s Transition Plan: the PublicEducation & Residential History

Prior July 2003

  • Interagency Congruency not clearly established

  • Communication inconsistent

  • Information sharing restrictions

  • Meeting schedule difficulties

  • Meeting notices inconsistent

  • Meeting attendees as available

  • Treatment plan input uniformity inconsistent

  • Transition plan at end of placement

  • Community Contacting responsibilities unclear

  • Court/Community involvement weak


Pennsylvania s transition plan education residential future
Pennsylvania’s Transition Plan: the PublicEducation & Residential Future

Post July 2003

  • State level interagency direction agreement

  • Meeting time compromise – 1 day/week – all disciplines represented

  • Formal and informal regularly scheduled review meetings combined

  • Division of labor:

    • Meeting scheduling

    • Meeting process

    • Community contacting

    • Treatment plan content institution wide consistency

  • Transition plan begun at start of placement

  • Court/Community involvement strategy developed & strengthened

  • Title 1 Transition Clerk approved

  • Teleconferencing utilization

  • Information sharing restrictions under joint review


DELINQUENT YOUTH the Public

HOME


Principles of transition accountability plans tap
Principles of Transition Accountability Plans (TAP) the Public

  • Measure offenders’ static and dynamic risk factors using validated assessment tools

  • Specify programs to reduce offender’s dynamic risks

  • Identify partners to help plan and implement plans for individual offenders

  • Develop TAP soon after an offender is admitted to prison


Advantages of transition accountability plans tap
Advantages of Transition Accountability Plans (TAP) the Public

  • Allows administrators to accurately measure and reallocate resources needed to alter offenders’ dynamic risk factors

  • Identifies responsibilities of offenders, correctional agencies and system partners for:

    • Creating,

    • Modifying, and

    • Implementing TAP

  • Promotes a continuum in interventions, services and information sharing over time and across and between agencies.


Stakeholders involved in partnerships
Stakeholders Involved in Partnerships the Public

Leaders

  • Juvenile Justice (judges, prosecutors, police, probation board, etc.)

  • Elected officials (legislators, local officials)

  • Agency directors (residential, health, human services, housing, employment, etc.)

    Enablers

  • Private foundations

  • Media

  • Other existing partnerships (state and/or community level)

    Institutions and Communities

  • Administrators (residential, heath, mental health)

  • Staff representing major functions (and their unions)

  • Community supervision agencies and staff

  • Victims and victim advocates

  • Faith-based organizations

  • Education community


Need to share data
Need to Share Data the Public

  • Effective case management requires different agencies to share data about persons with whom they work (e.g., residential, probation, health, employment, etc.)

  • Barriers to sharing must be over-come – e.g., confidentiality, turf, schedules

  • Case management is hampered if data sharing is:

    • Personal/Ad Hoc – works only if staff do not change

    • Expensive – redundant, labor-intensive

    • Slow-using manual transfer of paper records

  • We need a low-cost, seamless, real-time way to share information


For more information
FOR MORE INFORMATION the Public

JAMES H. KEELEY, Director

Juvenile Correctional Education

PENNSYLVANIA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

333 Market Street

Harrisburg, PA 17126-0333

717 783 9202 – Office

717 215 1910 – Cell

717 783 4305 – Fax

[email protected]

[email protected]


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