Welcome
Download
1 / 40

Welcome - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 90 Views
  • Uploaded on

Welcome. It’s About Time: A Model for Transformative Professional Development Presented by Ivan Cheng Collaboration and Student Success Conference June 20, 2006. Agenda. Background The SITTE model What we did What we found How we did it What we must do Where do we go next?

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Welcome' - ronald


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Welcome
Welcome

It’s About Time: A Model for

Transformative Professional Development

Presented by

Ivan Cheng

Collaboration and Student Success Conference

June 20, 2006


Agenda
Agenda

  • Background

  • The SITTE model

    • What we did

    • What we found

    • How we did it

    • What we must do

    • Where do we go next?

  • The DREAMS Collaborative


Background
Background

Problem

  • Algebra success rate in high schools is low in Los Angeles Unified School District.

  • Failure in algebra “triggers dropouts more than any single subject” according to Superintendent Roy Romer.

  • Teachers need time to rethink and revise their teaching strategies.


Background1
Background

What Teachers Need

“To improve their mathematics instruction, teachers must be able to analyze what they and their students are doing and consider how those actions are affecting students’ learning.” NCTM Principles and Standards, p. 18


Background2
Background

What Teachers Experience

“The environments in which most teachers work have been structured in ways that actually work against the kind of sustained collaboration that we have suggested is needed for significant and steady improvement.”Stigler and Hiebert, 1999, p. 172


What we did
What We Did

ARCHES Collaborative

  • Los Angeles Unified School District

  • California State University Northridge

  • Los Angeles Mission College

  • Project GRAD Los Angeles

  • Economic Alliance of the San Fernando Valley


What we did1
What We Did

ARCHES Collaborative

  • Los Angeles Unified School District

    • District 2 serves over 106,000 students

    • Provides extensive professional development for teachers

    • Provides paid time for teachers for teachers to engage in SITTE

    • Provides training for math coaches


What we did2
What We Did

ARCHES Collaborative

  • California State University Northridge

    • Engaged in Teachers for a New Era project sponsored by Carnegie Corp.

    • Provides resources through Center for Teaching and Learning

    • Provides personnel and knowledge for research and evaluation


What we did3
What We Did

ARCHES Collaborative

  • Los Angeles Mission College

    • Provides access to higher education for local community

    • Provides engaging programs such as culinary arts and robotics

    • Provides concurrent enrollment and college credit for high school students


What we did4
What We Did

ARCHES Collaborative

  • Project GRAD Los Angeles

    • National non-profit organization to promote college readiness and success

    • Provides tutoring, summer institutes, field trips for students

    • Provides training and resources for teachers and parents


What we did5
What We Did

ARCHES Collaborative

  • Economic Alliance of the San Fernando Valley

    • Networks local businesses to support education

    • Provides internship opportunities for students

    • Hosts education summits and meetings


What we did6
What We Did

ARCHES Collaborative

  • “Fix” the teachers to improve student achievement.

  • Focus on student learning to foster teacher learning.


What we did7
What We Did

ARCHES Collaborative

  • Designed a pilot project based on research from the Inter-session Teaching and Training (ITT) project in 2004

  • Implemented Student Improvement Through Teacher Empowerment (SITTE) pilot project in 2006


What we found
What We Found

How did ITT affect what teachers know about what their students know or don’t know?

  • Teachers increased their awareness of student thinking:

    • Acquaintance with alternative solutions

    • Watchfulness of student misconceptions

    • Attentiveness to student attitudes

    • Responsiveness to student reasoning

    • Expectation of trajectories in student thinking

  • Teachers increased the application of their knowledge of student thinking:

    • Guiding principles for lesson design


What we found1
What We Found

How did the ITT professional development experience affect teacher beliefs and practices?

  • Teachers increased their flexibility and resourcefulness

    • Departing from the textbook

    • Designing lessons based on student learning needs

  • Teachers increased in their sense of efficacy and confidence to find instructional solutions

    • Attitudes about students

    • Attitudes about self

  • Teachers increased their interdependence and teamwork

    • During ITT

    • After ITT


What we found2
What We Found

How did the ITT professional development experience affect student achievement?

  • Test scores improved

    • Significant improvement in MDTP

    • Small gains in District Quarterly Assessment

  • Grades improved

    • Pass rate increased (60.4%)

    • Perceptions of teachers improved

  • In-class performance and dispositions improved

    • Greater participation and higher engagement

    • Increased sense of efficacy and perseverance


What we found3
What We Found

How did the ITT professional development experience affect student achievement?

  • Test scores improved

    • Significant improvement in MDTP

    • Small gains in District Quarterly Assessment

  • Grades improved

    • Pass rate increased (60.4%)

    • Perceptions of teachers improved

  • In-class performance and dispositions improved

    • Greater participation and higher engagement

    • Increased sense of efficacy and perseverance


What we found4
What We Found

How did the ITT professional development experience affect student achievement?

  • Test scores improved

    • Significant improvement in MDTP

    • Small gains in District Quarterly Assessment

  • Grades improved

    • Pass rate increased (60.4%)

    • Perceptions of teachers improved

  • In-class performance and dispositions improved

    • Greater participation and higher engagement

    • Increased sense of efficacy and perseverance


What we found5
What We Found

How did the ITT professional development experience affect student achievement?

  • Test scores improved

    • Significant improvement in MDTP

    • Small gains in District Quarterly Assessment

  • Grades improved

    • Pass rate increased (60.4%)

    • Perceptions of teachers improved

  • In-class performance and dispositions improved

    • Greater participation and higher engagement

    • Increased sense of efficacy and perseverance


What we found6
What We Found

How did the ITT professional development experience affect student achievement?

  • Test scores improved

    • Significant improvement in MDTP

    • Small gains in District Quarterly Assessment

  • Grades improved

    • Pass rate increased (60.4%)

    • Perceptions of teachers improved

  • In-class performance and dispositions improved

    • Greater participation and higher engagement

    • Increased sense of efficacy and perseverance


What we found7
What We Found

How did the ITT professional development experience affect student achievement?

  • Test scores improved

    • Significant improvement in MDTP

    • Small gains in District Quarterly Assessment

  • Grades improved

    • Pass rate increased (60.4%)

    • Perceptions of teachers improved

  • In-class performance and dispositions improved

    • Greater participation and higher engagement

    • Increased sense of efficacy and perseverance

Comparison of Pass Rates


What we found8
What We Found

How did the SITTE professional development experience affect student achievement?

  • Test scores improved

    • Significant improvement in MDTP

    • Small gains in District Quarterly Assessment

  • Grades improved

    • Pass rate increased (60.4%)

    • Perceptions of teachers improved

  • In-class performance and dispositions improved

    • Greater participation and higher engagement

    • Increased sense of efficacy and perseverance

Comparison of Pass/Fail Rates

Pass

SITTE 2006

Inter-session 2005

SITTE 2006

Inter-session 2005

Fail


How we did it
How We Did It

Discussion

  • What are some ways that schools can foster teacher learning?


Ways to foster teacher learning
Ways to Foster Teacher Learning

  • Going to workshops--come back to share

  • Anchor teachers to mentor colleagues

  • Intensive training in Math Matters

  • Formalizing professional development in teacher training in technology

  • Website available, EdGate

  • Alternative assignments

  • Summer algebra flagship institute

  • Professional learning communities, master schedule with common preps

  • Sponsor teacher to go into industry


How we did it1

PD

Teacher

Student Achievement

How We Did It

Deficit “Empty Vessel” Model


How we did it2

Teacher

Learning

How We Did It

Focus on student learning to foster teacher learning

Student Learning


How we did it3
How We Did It

Professional Development as a Lever

Student

Learning &

Achievement

Knowledge


How we did it4
How We Did It

Method

  • Professional development aligned with district instructional guidance systems

  • Professional development situated in the context of actual classroom teaching

  • Daily collaborative lesson planning

  • Reflecting and refining lessons based on ongoing recognition of student thinking


How we did it5
How We Did It

Activity

  • “Scrambled Numbers”

  • Cover-Up Equations

  • Fraction Boxes


How we did it6
How We Did It

10 – = 7

Cover-Up Equations

2x + 1

3


What we must do
What We Must Do

Understand local context and teacher needs

Use teacher knowledge to build new knowledge

Focus on student improvement rather than teacher development

Provide tools and resources

Focus on what works, but ask tough questions

Create the environment that promotes engagement through empowerment


Where Do We Go Next?

Discussion

  • What elements of this model did you like?

  • What elements have we not considered?

  • What would it take to make this work in your setting?


What elements did you like
What Elements Did You Like?

  • Identify the problem and come up with solutions

  • “It’s the student’s fault”

  • Focus on what teachers already know

  • Teacher dialogue

  • Sharing strategies

  • Focused on structuring information rather than clinging to book

  • Attention to patterns and student understanding


What have we not considered
What Have We Not Considered?

  • What about kids who don’t come prepared

  • Who decides the curriculum? Or structure at the start?

  • Future tracking of student achievement

  • Intervention for support class during class?

  • Survey students at the end of the course

  • Return on investment based on numbers of students and cost savings


Where Do We Go Next?

The Challenge

Leadership needs to shift “from one of bureaucratic authority, where change is led by telling and selling, to a leadership style of protecting commitment to shared values determined by teachers engaged in a collaborative and co-creative process.”

Dr. Timothy Kanold

NCSM President


Where Do We Go Next?

A New Vision

Developing Resources and Empowering Activities to Motivate Students (DREAMS)

  • Scale up effort for SITTE

  • Technology support for collaboration

  • Robotics pipeline for students

  • Internship opportunities with RWCs

  • DREAMS Summit to create new solutions


The DREAMS Collaborative

  • A New Vision

  • Based on SITTE process of empowerment

  • Focused on student achievement

  • Aimed at changing systems

  • Structured to provide room to grow

  • Energized by innovation and creativity

  • Designed to benefit all stakeholders

  • Sustained by ongoing collaboration


Thank you
Thank You

It’s About Time: A Model for

Transformative Professional Development

Ivan Cheng [email protected]

www.csun.edu/~icheng

Joe Morgan [email protected]

Collaboration and Student Success Conference

June 20, 2006



ad