Community Mobilization

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Community Mobilization

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1. Community Mobilization Orientation for CM Policy Board Members Welcome to the CM Policy Board Member Orientation. We are going to offer an overview of the CM Program and focus on the roles and responsibilities of the CM Policy Board. We will have about 2 hours to cover this material. My style is very informal. Please feel free to stop me & ask questions, make comments, etc. I will, however, try to keep us on time.Welcome to the CM Policy Board Member Orientation. We are going to offer an overview of the CM Program and focus on the roles and responsibilities of the CM Policy Board. We will have about 2 hours to cover this material. My style is very informal. Please feel free to stop me & ask questions, make comments, etc. I will, however, try to keep us on time.

2. Introductions Name, Organization, Position How long have you been on the Board? What other experience do you have in the field of Substance Abuse and Violence Prevention? (Go around the room, introduce self & then ask others to introduce themselves.) (This may not be something you need to do on your Board if all members have been working together for some time and know each other. However,it can be helpful if you have new members and, in any case, it may be interesting for Board Members to hear more about their fellow Members’ backgrounds.)(Go around the room, introduce self & then ask others to introduce themselves.) (This may not be something you need to do on your Board if all members have been working together for some time and know each other. However,it can be helpful if you have new members and, in any case, it may be interesting for Board Members to hear more about their fellow Members’ backgrounds.)

3. Purpose of Orientation Help CM Board members become more familiar with the philosophy and expectations of Community Mobilization. Help Board members understand the scope of their authority & responsibility Explain some of the policies and procedures of the CM Program Provide an opportunity to discuss and ask questions about CM and the Board’s role (Review listed purposes.) Do you have any other hopes or expectations for this training? (Review listed purposes.) Do you have any other hopes or expectations for this training?

4. Orientation Materials CM Policies and Procedures Manual Sections I – XI Appendices A-L CM Board Member’s Packet Handbook pages including: CM Fact Sheet ­ VRDE Sheet Federal Funding Update ­ Tip of CAPT CM Map ­ Program Summary** WestCAPT Research ­ WestCAPT Best Practices CTED’s Monitoring Tool ­ Additional Resources Training Evaluation Acronyms list Developing Healthy Communities Brochure

5. Overview of CM Community Mobilization Vision Community Mobilization Mission Community Mobilization Purpose Program Overview

6. CM Vision Community Mobilization is: Community members participating in creating and sustaining healthy, safe and economically viable communities, free from substance abuse and violence, and all related social ills. Our vision is that communities all across the state will take upon themselves the responsibility for making their environment a safe, healthy, & wholesome place to live, work, learn & play. Research has demonstrated that substance abuse & violence are not only damaging to communities on their own, but that they are associated with many other social ills, such as: (ask participants to name some social ills). Robbery/burglary, Assault/murder, child abuse/domestic violence, poverty, lowered ability to learn, & a lowered ability to be self-sufficient & contribute to society. . . . Our vision is that communities all across the state will take upon themselves the responsibility for making their environment a safe, healthy, & wholesome place to live, work, learn & play. Research has demonstrated that substance abuse & violence are not only damaging to communities on their own, but that they are associated with many other social ills, such as: (ask participants to name some social ills). Robbery/burglary, Assault/murder, child abuse/domestic violence, poverty, lowered ability to learn, & a lowered ability to be self-sufficient & contribute to society. . . .

7. CM Mission The mission of Community Mobilization Against Substance Abuse and Violence is to effectively address the problems of substance abuse and violence by promoting: Collaboration, Cooperation, Communication, Commitment, and Cultural Competency. The five “C’s” of the Community Mobilization Mission have been an important aspect of our work for the majority of our history as a program. The five “C’s” are the “how” of the mission & articulate our values about how we work with each other & our communities.The five “C’s” of the Community Mobilization Mission have been an important aspect of our work for the majority of our history as a program. The five “C’s” are the “how” of the mission & articulate our values about how we work with each other & our communities.

8. CM Purpose To provide incentive and support for communities to develop targeted and coordinated strategies to reduce the impact and incidence of the abuse of alcohol and other drugs and violence. Mandates: Reduce substance abuse and violence Accomplish this through community organizing It is the purpose of the CM Program to provide support to the CM Policy Board, so that you may be successful in your goal of reducing substance abuse and violence. And, as the county CM Coordinator, I will work to help you get what you need to direct that effort. Notice that CM’s mandate is two-fold: to reduce substance abuse and violence AND to organize communities toward that effort. So, you can see that the CM Board is at the heart of this effort to involve the community.It is the purpose of the CM Program to provide support to the CM Policy Board, so that you may be successful in your goal of reducing substance abuse and violence. And, as the county CM Coordinator, I will work to help you get what you need to direct that effort. Notice that CM’s mandate is two-fold: to reduce substance abuse and violence AND to organize communities toward that effort. So, you can see that the CM Board is at the heart of this effort to involve the community.

9. Program Overview CM is authorized under the Omnibus Controlled Substances and Alcohol Abuse Act of 1989. In 1994, Washington voters reaffirmed their support for CM as a continuing priority through passage of the Omnibus Youth Violence Prevention Act for the purpose of funding local efforts. The U.S. Department of Education, through the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act, Governor’s Portion, provides funding to reduce the incidence of substance abuse and violence. Community Mobilization has been around since 1989. At that time, counties were allocated funding to run locally driven, locally supported prevention programming. Over the years the basis of that funding has expanded to include federal funds, &, in some cases, city/ county funding. (The following slide shows the actual state and federal authorizing legislation.) Community Mobilization has been around since 1989. At that time, counties were allocated funding to run locally driven, locally supported prevention programming. Over the years the basis of that funding has expanded to include federal funds, &, in some cases, city/ county funding. (The following slide shows the actual state and federal authorizing legislation.)

10. Legislative Mandates State and Federal Regulations Washington State – RCW 43.270 (See App. A) Violence Reduction and Drug Enforcement Account (VRDE) – See VRDE handbook page (buff color) Federal Law – ESEA Title IV (See App. B) Principles of Effectiveness – Sec. 4115 (a) p. B-9 Governor’s Portion of SDFSC Grant – Sec. 4112 (a) p. B-2 Education Dept. General Accounting Requirements The State funding comes from taxes on soda pop syrup. The Federal funding comes from the Safe and Drug Free Schools and Communities (SDFSC) section of 21st Century Schools Act. Because of shifting political environments, resources, and legislative priorities, the state and federal sources of funds are in jeopardy from time to time. So you will likely find yourself engaged in advocacy at the local or state level. (Describe how it works in your county – e.g., does the Board have a Legislative Committee?) Community Boards and individual members are in the position of being able to lobby to advocate for their funding sources, unlike employees such as your CM Coordinator, who are only allowed to provide education. The State funding comes from taxes on soda pop syrup. The Federal funding comes from the Safe and Drug Free Schools and Communities (SDFSC) section of 21st Century Schools Act. Because of shifting political environments, resources, and legislative priorities, the state and federal sources of funds are in jeopardy from time to time. So you will likely find yourself engaged in advocacy at the local or state level. (Describe how it works in your county – e.g., does the Board have a Legislative Committee?) Community Boards and individual members are in the position of being able to lobby to advocate for their funding sources, unlike employees such as your CM Coordinator, who are only allowed to provide education.

11. Program Overview (cont’d) CM uses the Communities That Care Model See CM P & P - Appendix K Four Domains for Risk & Protective Factors: Community, School, Family, Peer/Individual Risk/Protective Factors are prioritized based on the County’s Needs See Developing Healthy Communities Brochure (white) Community Mobilization, along with most of the prevention programs in this state, use a Risk/Protective Factors Model. This model was developed by Drs. Hawkins & Catalano at the U of WA in the 1970s. The premise they developed is that certain risk factors make substance abuse & violence more likely, while certain protective factors mitigate the use of substance abuse & violence. Risk & Protective factors are broken down into 4 domains. Most communities have a number of risk/protective factors, so it may become necessary to prioritize (or limit) the factors the CM program will address.Community Mobilization, along with most of the prevention programs in this state, use a Risk/Protective Factors Model. This model was developed by Drs. Hawkins & Catalano at the U of WA in the 1970s. The premise they developed is that certain risk factors make substance abuse & violence more likely, while certain protective factors mitigate the use of substance abuse & violence. Risk & Protective factors are broken down into 4 domains. Most communities have a number of risk/protective factors, so it may become necessary to prioritize (or limit) the factors the CM program will address.

12. Introduction to CM Policies and Procedures The CM P&P manual is a useful tool for CM program oversight, management, and implementation Every CM contractor and CM Board Chair should have one CTED sends updates periodically via e-mail Keep your manual up-to-date Incorporated by reference into CM contract

13. Application for Funding Process, Basis, and Eligibility RFQ and Application (See App. D – RFQ, and E - App) Contractual Agents Local Govt., School District or ESDIHE, or Non-profit 501(c)(3) Risk and Protective Factors See Developing Healthy Communities Brochure (white) See Appendix K, Communities That Care® See Tip of the CAPT (blue) See http://casat.unr.edu/westcapt/ Minimum 16 hrs./wk. of community organizing There are 2 parts to the application packet: The RFQ is competitive. It determines who is qualified to be a contractual agent, and who has the capacity to provide the prevention services. The RFQ response will need to be submitted every other biennium (4 years), or sooner if there is a new contractual agent. The application focuses primarily on what work will be done (statement of work), how it will be measured, and the budget that will be required to accomplish the work. A wide variety of contractual agents is possible. The CM Program uses the evidence-based Risk and Protective Factor model The community organizing aspect of the CM mandate is so important that CM requires a minimum of 16 hours per week be spent in organizing and support activities.There are 2 parts to the application packet: The RFQ is competitive. It determines who is qualified to be a contractual agent, and who has the capacity to provide the prevention services. The RFQ response will need to be submitted every other biennium (4 years), or sooner if there is a new contractual agent. The application focuses primarily on what work will be done (statement of work), how it will be measured, and the budget that will be required to accomplish the work. A wide variety of contractual agents is possible. The CM Program uses the evidence-based Risk and Protective Factor model The community organizing aspect of the CM mandate is so important that CM requires a minimum of 16 hours per week be spent in organizing and support activities.

14. Competitive Process and RFQ Federal funding requires a competitive process. (See Appendix D - RFQ) Counties or agencies interested in providing CM services may apply through a RFQ process: Show fiscal capacity as well as capacity to provide county-wide services. Show knowledge and capacity to provide CM organizational activities and support. Have knowledge and capacity to use risk and protective factor approach.

15. Contracts and Amendments Policy See Appendix G - Contracts See Appendix F - Amendments Subcontracts Procurement and Property Management Non-supplanting Suspension and Cost Recovery Subcontracts are allowable. There are certain contract stipulations that are required to appear in the subcontract (see the CM P&P) Equipment may be purchased with CM funds. See the CM P& P for specific property management requirements. Non-supplanting means that CM funds may not be used to replace local, state, or federal funding which would otherwise be made available had the CM funding not been provided. If the contract is ended or suspended, and the State has paid the Contractor for services found not to be complete, then the Contractor will be required to refund the overpayment to the State. Subcontracts are allowable. There are certain contract stipulations that are required to appear in the subcontract (see the CM P&P) Equipment may be purchased with CM funds. See the CM P& P for specific property management requirements. Non-supplanting means that CM funds may not be used to replace local, state, or federal funding which would otherwise be made available had the CM funding not been provided. If the contract is ended or suspended, and the State has paid the Contractor for services found not to be complete, then the Contractor will be required to refund the overpayment to the State.

16. Contracts and Amendments (cont’d) Allowable Costs Administrative costs up to 10% of total award. Only STATE funds used for admin. costs. Supervision of staff and fiscal reporting are considered administrative costs. Operating costs directly associated with coordination and implementation of activities to provide prevention, treatment (state funds only), and law enforcement activities. Contractors are allowed to take up to 10% administrative costs. These are all taken from state funds. Administrative costs are such things as time charged to the program by executive directors (for oversight as opposed to direct service), book-keepers salary, indirect costs assessed to the program, etc. Operating costs cover all costs associated with implementing the program, including space to hold events, supplies, program coordinator salary, etc. Contractors are allowed to take up to 10% administrative costs. These are all taken from state funds. Administrative costs are such things as time charged to the program by executive directors (for oversight as opposed to direct service), book-keepers salary, indirect costs assessed to the program, etc. Operating costs cover all costs associated with implementing the program, including space to hold events, supplies, program coordinator salary, etc.

17. Contracts and Amendments (cont’d) Match Requirements: Required to identify cash or donations match of a minimum of 25% May be: salaries, benefits, contracted services, goods & services, travel, training, equipment, and volunteer time. Match requirement is a minimum of 25%. This may be accomplished through donations of cash, goods, service, volunteer time, or a combination of all of those. Match requirement is a minimum of 25%. This may be accomplished through donations of cash, goods, service, volunteer time, or a combination of all of those.

18. Policy Board Policy Board (NOT advisory only) Membership Represent community as whole Minimum: Representation from education, law enforcement, treatment, local/tribal government, and parents (RCW 43.270.010) Other: Prevention partners, youth, tribes, local ethnic groups, faith community, business, juvenile justice, health dept., community members at large, age, gender, geographic distribution Policy Board requirements on next five slides are in Section 7 of the CM P&P. The Board’s function is to direct the activities of the program in keeping with community needs. Since the early days of Community Mobilization, one of the key components has been locally driven programming. We have required that each CM contractor have a decision-making board (NOT just advisory) that is representative of its community. These boards must include representation from at least five areas: education, law enforcement, treatment, local government, and parents. If the contractual agent is a county, how does the Board of County Commissioners fit into the authority structure? (CTED;s perspective is that the CM Board has decision making authority, not just advisory to the BOCC.) If Board members are also subcontractors, this raises potential conflict of interest issues It’s important that any subcontractor Board member recuse themselves from any discussion and decision relating to their subcontract. Policy Board requirements on next five slides are in Section 7 of the CM P&P. The Board’s function is to direct the activities of the program in keeping with community needs. Since the early days of Community Mobilization, one of the key components has been locally driven programming. We have required that each CM contractor have a decision-making board (NOT just advisory) that is representative of its community. These boards must include representation from at least five areas: education, law enforcement, treatment, local government, and parents. If the contractual agent is a county, how does the Board of County Commissioners fit into the authority structure? (CTED;s perspective is that the CM Board has decision making authority, not just advisory to the BOCC.) If Board members are also subcontractors, this raises potential conflict of interest issues It’s important that any subcontractor Board member recuse themselves from any discussion and decision relating to their subcontract.

19. Policy Board (cont’d) By-Laws (CM P&P, Sect. VII-1) How members are selected How officers are selected, duties Meeting schedule Define quorum How decisions are made How minutes kept, distributed, reviewed Who has authority to sign legal documents How by-laws may be amended CM Policy Boards are required to have by-laws that include, at a minimum, these topics. A conflict of interest can arise in the decision-making process. For example, in some counties subcontractors are represented on the CM Policy Board. In this situation, it is essential that those subcontractor members recuse themselves from the discussion and vote when decisions are being made regarding funding. This means that they do not participate in the process at all. In fact, it is advisable for them not to be present when discussion or voting are occurring.CM Policy Boards are required to have by-laws that include, at a minimum, these topics. A conflict of interest can arise in the decision-making process. For example, in some counties subcontractors are represented on the CM Policy Board. In this situation, it is essential that those subcontractor members recuse themselves from the discussion and vote when decisions are being made regarding funding. This means that they do not participate in the process at all. In fact, it is advisable for them not to be present when discussion or voting are occurring.

20. Policy Board (cont’d) Planning (CM P&P, Sect. VII-1) Involved in all decisions re: planning, implementation, and review of CM Program Vision/Mission Statements, Goals, Objectives Collaborative Needs Assessment (See App. C) Select strategies/programs to address goals Select outcome measures The CM Policy Board should be involved in the major aspects of the CM Program planning, implementation, and review. (Review how you proceed with these major aspects of the planning process in your county, and how the Board is involved.)The CM Policy Board should be involved in the major aspects of the CM Program planning, implementation, and review. (Review how you proceed with these major aspects of the planning process in your county, and how the Board is involved.)

21. Policy Board (cont’d) Oversight (CM P&P, Sect. VII-2) Choose contractual agent Memorandum of Understanding (App. H ) Program Implementation Financial status Program reports Program Coordinator activities Outcome measures and results The MOU needs to be updated every four years, or sooner if either of the officials designated to sign the MOU is replaced (usually the Board Chair or contractual agent). (Review how you proceed with these major aspects of the oversight process in your county, and how the Board is involved.) The MOU needs to be updated every four years, or sooner if either of the officials designated to sign the MOU is replaced (usually the Board Chair or contractual agent). (Review how you proceed with these major aspects of the oversight process in your county, and how the Board is involved.)

22. Policy Board (cont’d) Community Involvement (CM P&P, Sect. VII-2) Educate policy makers Represent local CM Program to media Liaison between Board & community partners Fund-raising, fund sustainability Written Outreach Plan (Review how you proceed with these major aspects of the community involvement process in your county, and how the Board is involved.) (Review how you proceed with these major aspects of the community involvement process in your county, and how the Board is involved.)

23. Policy Board (cont’d) Review of Decision-making capacity Determine Risk/Protective Factors and population to be targeted Develop goals, measurable outcomes and strategies Select projects and activities Review progress of projects Review financial reports (Review how you proceed with these major aspects of decision-making in your county, and how the Board is involved.) (Review how you proceed with these major aspects of decision-making in your county, and how the Board is involved.)

24. Role of CM Coordinator Take direction from the CM Board Carry out decisions of the CM Board Provide technical assistance to the Board Act as resource and referral source Provide other support, as needed, for the success of the CM program It is my role and intention as the _________ County CM Coordinator to provide the support necessary for you Board members to be successful in the community we serve. As staff person to this Board, I am here to take direction from and carry out the decisions of this Board. I can also be provide technical assistance, help problem-solve, and act as a resource to help you find the information or expertise you need. It is my role and intention as the _________ County CM Coordinator to provide the support necessary for you Board members to be successful in the community we serve. As staff person to this Board, I am here to take direction from and carry out the decisions of this Board. I can also be provide technical assistance, help problem-solve, and act as a resource to help you find the information or expertise you need.

25. Program Requirements Timeline: April: Application due May: Contract/amendment signed July 10: Final Closeout Report July 31: Program Summary Report See Sample handout Aug. 31 & Jan. 31: Program Activity Reports (PAR) (App. I) October: CM Annual Meeting (Coordinator) Quarterly: Regional Meetings (Coordinator) 1 time per year: CM-related trainings (Coordinator) Outcome measures (Appendix J): Feb. 28: CM Scorecard June 15: Surveys July 1: Focus Groups These are the major contract deliverables for the contract year and their due dates The CM board Chair will receive an updated list of due dates from CTED about 2 times per year. Since the Board has oversight of the CM program, I will keep you aware of when I/we have complies with each of these requirements. If I haven’t let you know, please ask me about them..These are the major contract deliverables for the contract year and their due dates The CM board Chair will receive an updated list of due dates from CTED about 2 times per year. Since the Board has oversight of the CM program, I will keep you aware of when I/we have complies with each of these requirements. If I haven’t let you know, please ask me about them..

26. Outcome Measures Data collected statewide – See App. J CM Scorecard required Evaluate at least one project or activity, using appropriate statewide measurement tool. Contractor may choose project(s). CM Evaluator provides assistance in selecting, using, and analyzing results of statewide measurement activity. Evaluation remains an important part of the program. CTED has an evaluator on staff. Daniel Amos directs the evaluation activities. We continue to learn new ways to measure outcomes for our programs. Currently, CTED requires each contractor to choose one of a number of outcome tools to measure at least one program. CTED also requires coordinators to submit a community scorecard measurement tool which is geared to measure the quality of your community organizing. These are the data that are collected statewide. Other additional measurements we use locally are ______________. (List the ones you are using.) Evaluation remains an important part of the program. CTED has an evaluator on staff. Daniel Amos directs the evaluation activities. We continue to learn new ways to measure outcomes for our programs. Currently, CTED requires each contractor to choose one of a number of outcome tools to measure at least one program. CTED also requires coordinators to submit a community scorecard measurement tool which is geared to measure the quality of your community organizing. These are the data that are collected statewide. Other additional measurements we use locally are ______________. (List the ones you are using.)

27. Outcome Measures (cont’d) Community Program Evaluation: Community Mobilization Scorecard Community Domain Survey Focus Group Family Program Evaluation: Family Tension Measure Survey Focus Group Peer Individual Program Evaluation: Individual Domain Survey Focus Group School Program Evaluation: School Domain Survey Focus Group (Review how you proceed with these major aspects of the evaluation process in your county, and how the Board is involved.) (Review how you proceed with these major aspects of the evaluation process in your county, and how the Board is involved.)

28. Program Requirements (cont’d) Meetings for CM Coordinators CM Advisory Committee (5/year) (not required) See sample CMAC Minutes (yellow color) CMAC Subcommittee and Task Forces (various) CM Regional Meetings (5/year) See sample meeting schedule (goldenrod color) CM Annual Meeting See sample Annual Meeting Minutes (white w/pictures) CM-related training (1/year) The Community Mobilization Advisory Committee (CMAC) is a statewide committee that advises CTED regarding matters having to do with the CM program. It is comprised of 9 CM contractors, 2 from each of 4 regions, plus 1 from King County.The Community Mobilization Advisory Committee (CMAC) is a statewide committee that advises CTED regarding matters having to do with the CM program. It is comprised of 9 CM contractors, 2 from each of 4 regions, plus 1 from King County.

29. Special Projects Methamphetamine Initiative Meth Action Teams PAR is required for each MAT Quarterly Conveners’ Meeting The Meth Initiative provides $4,000/year/county to reduce the use and production of methamphetamine. Meth Action Teams (MAT) are co-convened in each county by the Sheriff and the CM Coordinator. The Convener's meetings provide updates on the statewide meth picture, educational opportunities, and time to share successes from the counties. They are attended by the CM Coordinator, Sheriff, or other representative of the MAT.The Meth Initiative provides $4,000/year/county to reduce the use and production of methamphetamine. Meth Action Teams (MAT) are co-convened in each county by the Sheriff and the CM Coordinator. The Convener's meetings provide updates on the statewide meth picture, educational opportunities, and time to share successes from the counties. They are attended by the CM Coordinator, Sheriff, or other representative of the MAT.

30. Importance and Use of Boards in CM Programs Comments by Community Mobilization Coordinator Discussion, Questions, Answers and Problem-Solving (Please provide any additional comments here or take time to address any particular concerns the Board is currently facing.) (Please provide any additional comments here or take time to address any particular concerns the Board is currently facing.)

31. Community Mobilization Questions, Answers, and Discussion When to ask for help: Anytime! Who to ask: Your Local CM Program Coordinator Your State CM Program Coordinator Your State CM Evaluation Specialist What questions do you have? Remember you can ask for help at any time, You can ask any of us.What questions do you have? Remember you can ask for help at any time, You can ask any of us.

32. Community Mobilization Welcome to the Team! We hope your future is full of success! Please complete an evaluation (salmon color) Thank you for your willingness to serve on the CM Policy Board. You are an integral part of the CM team.Thank you for your willingness to serve on the CM Policy Board. You are an integral part of the CM team.

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