Exploring Disagreement: Children’s & Mothers’ Reports of Children’s Moods
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 22

Diana Harrington School of Social Ecology University of California, Irvine May 13, 2006 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 48 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Exploring Disagreement: Children’s & Mothers’ Reports of Children’s Moods. Diana Harrington School of Social Ecology University of California, Irvine May 13, 2006 UROP Symposium. Children’s Moods. Can children become depressed?. Why do we care if they do?.

Download Presentation

Diana Harrington School of Social Ecology University of California, Irvine May 13, 2006

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

Exploring Disagreement: Children’s & Mothers’ Reports of Children’s Moods

Diana Harrington

School of Social Ecology

University of California, Irvine

May 13, 2006

UROP Symposium


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

Children’s Moods

  • Can children become depressed?

  • Why do we care if they do?

  • Late Childhood and Early Adolescence (Larson et al. 2002)


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

Who can tell us about children’s emotional states?

Their parents

The kids

Do they say the same thing?


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

(Cole, 2000,2002; Muris, 2003)

Other Existing Information

  • Differences between parents’ and children’s reports

  • (Ferro, 1994; Fincham, 1998; Sorensen, 2005;

  • Hankin 1998)

  • Children's Expression and Experience of Depressive Symptoms

  • (Cole, 2002; Roza, 2003; Hankin, 1998)

They do not.


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

What We Do Not Know

  • Are there Age Differences in extent of (Dis)Agreement between Parents’ and Children’s Report?

  • Are there Gender Differences in extent of (Dis)Agreement between Parents’ and Children’s Report?


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

Hypotheses

  • Correlations Between Mothers’ and Children’s Reports will be Positive but modest.

2. Older children’s reports will be more highly associated with mothers’ reports than will younger children’s reports.

3. Girls’ reports will be more highly associated with mothers’ reports than will boys’ reports.


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

The Data:

Palmtop Partners

Dr. Carol Whalen

  • Parent-child interactions and moods throughout the day

  • Electronic Diary data

  • Mothers AND children’s responses

  • Control group


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

The Participants

  • Mother and child volunteers for a study involving 7 consecutive days of frequent electronic monitoring using PDAs

  • Children ages 8-12.9; mothers ages 30–51.6

  • 40 children 8 to 10.5 years of age;

  • 38 children 10.5 to 12.9 years

  • 44 boys and 34 girls


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

Data Analysis

  • Correlational analysis of children’s reports with mothers’ reports of child’s moods

  • “Bored”

  • “Stress”

  • “Worried”

  • “Angry”

  • “Felt good about self”

  • “Good mood”

  • “Sad”


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

Results:

Do the data support the hypotheses?


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

  • Correlations Between Mothers’ and Children’s Reportswill be positive but modest.

  • Highest correlation for any age or gender group on any mood

r = 0.604**

  • But some were really low

Negative moods

  • They were all positive correlations


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

* significance at p < 0.05 ** significance at p < 0.01

2.Older children’s reports will be more highly associated with mothers’ reportsthan will younger children’s reports.

  • Yes– For 6 of 7 moods

 Especially

 Exception


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

* significance at p < 0.05 ** significance at p < 0.01

3.Girls’ reports will bemore highly associatedwith mothers’ reports than will boys’ reports.

  • Yes– For 5 of 7 moods

 Especially

 Exception

 Exception


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

Discussion:

What does this all mean?


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

Parents’ and children’s reports are NOT interchangeable.


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

Speculations

  • Why are correlations so low for the negative moods?

“Sad,” “worried”  “Bored”

“Worried” & “Stress” confusion


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

Limitations

  • Self Selection: Families that participate

Range of moods

  • Definitions of moods

“Stress”


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

Future Research

  • Larger sample size

  • What happens if the parent is a father?

  • Different Cultures & SES

  • Wider age range of children


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

Aknowledgments:

Dr. Carol Whalen

Natasha Emmerson

Dr. Sharon Ishikawa

Dr. Valerie Jenness

UROP


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

References

  Cole, David A., et al. (2000). Structural differences in parent and child reports of children’s symptoms of depression and anxiety. Psychological Assessment. 17, 174-185

 Cole, David A., et al. (2002). Individual differences in the emergence of depressive symptoms in children and adolescents: a longitudinal investigation of parent and child reports. Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 111, 156-165

 Ferro, Tova, et al. (1994). Depressive disorders: distinctions in children. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 33, 664-670

Fincham, Frank D., et. al. (1998). Children’s attributions in the family: The children’s relationship attribution measure. Journal of Family Psychology. 12, 481-493

 Hankin, Benjamin L., et al. (1998). Development of depression from preadolescence to young adulthood: emerging gender differences in a 10-year longitudinal study. Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 107, 128-140

 Larson, R., & Richards, M. H. (1994) Divergent Realities: The emotional lives of mothers, fathers, and adolescents. New York: Basic Books.

 Larson, R. W., et al. (2002). Continuity, stability, and change in daily emotional experiences across adolescence. Child Development. 73, 1151-1165

 Muris, Peter, Meesters, Cor, & Spinder, Miranda (2003). Relationships between child- and parent-reported behavioural inhibition and symptoms of anxiety and depression in normal adolescents. Personality and Individual Differences. 34, 759-771

 Roza, Sabine J., et. al. (2003). Stable prediction of mood and anxiety disorders based on behavioral and emotional problems in childhood: a 14-year follow-up during childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. American Journal of Psychiatry. 160, 2116-2121

 Sørensen, Merete Juul, et al. (2004) Age and gender differences in depressive symptomology and comorbidity: an incident sample of psychiatrically admitted children. Journal of Affective Disorders. 84, 85-91

 Steinberg, Lawrence (2002). Adolescence. New York: McGraw-Hill.


Diana harrington school of social ecology university of california irvine may 13 2006

-Thank you-

Any Questions?

Diana Harrington

[email protected]


  • Login