Proposed core literacies for rowan university graduates
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Proposed Core Literacies for Rowan University Graduates. General Education Tactical Team February/March 2011 . Members:. Janet Moore Lindman, History, co-chair James Newell, Associate Provost, co-chair Bryan Appleby-Wineberg, Music Jay Chaskes, Sociology, Exploratory Studies

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Proposed Core Literacies for Rowan University Graduates

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Proposed core literacies for rowan university graduates

Proposed Core Literacies for Rowan University Graduates

General Education Tactical Team

February/March 2011


Members

Members:

Janet Moore Lindman, History, co-chair

James Newell, Associate Provost, co-chair

Bryan Appleby-Wineberg, Music

Jay Chaskes, Sociology, Exploratory Studies

Roberta Harvey, Writing Arts, Provost Fellow

David Klassen, Physics/Astronomy

Mira Lalovic-Hand, Associate Provost, Institutional Effectiveness

Rory McElwee, Psychology, Rowan Seminar

Cindy Vitto, Associate Dean, CLAS

Rihab Ezzat Saadeddine, graduate student

Joseph Perella, undergraduate student


Context for reform

Context for Reform:

“A well-crafted and distinctive GE could be the bedrock of a Rowan education. Rowan’s carefully crafted effort may no longer fit the needs of its students. Both the GE curriculum and its assessment might benefit from a thorough reconsideration and possible update.”

–Middle States Report, 2009


Context for reform1

Context for Reform:

  • Concerns for the Current Model:

    • Input, menu-driven model: assumes learning outcomes are met through course completion

    • Rationale for general education and relationships among knowledge areas not clear to students

    • “Banks” of loosely affiliated courses lack coherence

    • Misalignment between stated goals and actual curriculum


Context for reform2

Context for Reform:

Social and Behavioral Sciences Bank:

1. Students will demonstrate an understanding of major concepts, theories, and methods in one or more of the social and behavioral sciences

2. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the development of human society as it relates to culture, geography, and language in the context of an emerging interdependent, global community

3. Students will demonstrate an ability to apply basic methodologies used in the measurement of social and behavioral science.

How many students take a constellation of courses that actually address these goals comprehensively? How would we know if they have met this goal?


Reform process

Reform Process:

  • Transparency & communication:

    • Meetings with each College and with other constituencies (Deans, Senate, Advisors, Chairs, Students)

    • Information and updates on the Faculty Center website (forthcoming)

    • Open forums for the University community

    • Email updates

  • Stages of the reform process:

    • Conceptual phase

    • Implementation phase


Reform process1

Reform Process:

  • Inclusive source material:

    • Shared values in Rowan mission statements (University, Colleges, Programs)

    • Current and former Rowan gen ed models & proposals

    • Literature on best practices in higher ed (AAC&U, etc.)


Reform process2

Reform Process:

A Re-Formed View of Undergraduate Education:

Our values for what every Rowan student should be like at graduation (knowledge, dispositions, skills)

Distinct from, and supportive of, the values that each College and Program has for its students

Gives more flexibility to Colleges and Programs to specify learning outcomes for their own students


Reform process3

Reform Process:

  • Identification of Core Literacies:

    • What are the knowledge, skills, and dispositions for every Rowan graduate that are best developed universally, independent of the disciplines?

      • Core literacies

  • What are the knowledge, skills, and dispositions for every Rowan graduate that are best developed in the context of the disciplines?

    • Transdisciplinary competencies


Our values for rowan graduates

Our Values for Rowan Graduates:

  • Core Literacies

    • Characterize every Rowan graduate and form the general education program

  • Transdisciplinary Competencies

    • Developed throughout the general education and major curriculum; individual programs define and assess each according to its own values

  • Discipline-Specific Knowledge, Dispositions, and Skills:

    • Defined and assessed by individual programs


Proposed core literacies of rowan graduates

Proposed Core Literacies of Rowan Graduates:

  • Aesthetic Literacy

  • Communicative Literacy

  • Mathematical Literacy

  • Scientific Literacy

  • Sociocultural Literacy


Transdisciplinary competencies

Transdisciplinary Competencies:

Technological literacy

Information literacy

Critical thinking

Inquiry

Problem-solving

Creativity

Intentional learning

Teamwork

Integrative learning

Leadership


Timeline for reform

Timeline for Reform:

  • Spring 2011:

    • Develop core literacies

    • Plan implementation

    • Continually seek input from constituencies

    • Issue preliminary report

  • Fall 2011: issue final report & submit curriculum proposal

  • Fall 2012: implement new model


Your input

Your Input:

Questions?

Comments?


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