2008 Butterfly Count on Dike 14  Nature Preserve

2008 Butterfly Count on Dike 14 Nature Preserve PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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2008 Butterfly Count on Dike 14 Nature Preserve

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1. Long Term Monitoring of Butterflies Transect – Fourth Year April 1, 2008 –November 10, 2008 2008 Butterfly Count on Dike 14 Nature Preserve

2. Spring Azure - Celastrina ladon The first butterfly of the season on Dike 14 Spring Azures fly during April and May. On April 1, 2008

3. Cabbage White - Pieris rapae The Cabbage White butterfly was the second species to emerge on The Dike. We had 6,871 individuals flying on the transect during the year, with thousands more outside the measured space. Cabbage Whites have multiple Broods.

4. Mourning Cloak – Nymphalis antiopa It was a good year for Mourning Cloaks. We had 17 individuals. Never abundant, they survive the Winter as adults, hibernating between bark ridges and cracks in wood. They Are our longest living butterfly, living 10 months and mating in the Summer.

5. Orange Sulphur – Colias eurytheme We had 1,871 individuals flying On the transect this year. A very large emergence in September accounted for a third of this number. It flies spring to fall and has multiple broods

6. Black Swallowtail – Papilio Polyxenes We had 331 Black Swallowtail individuals that were counted along the transect. This Black swallowtail caterpillar is munching on Poison Hemlock leaves.

7. Black Swallowtail Egg on a leaflet of the bipinnately compound Poison Hemlock leaf. A member of the Parsley Family, it covers large areas on the Dike and provides ample food sources for the hatching eggs. This insures a large population of Black Swallowtails.

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