How did chemists begin to organize the known elements
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6.1. How did chemists begin to organize the known elements?. Chemists used the properties of elements to sort them into groups Chlorine, bromine, and iodine have very similar chemical properties. (Dobereiner, 1829). 6.1. Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids.

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How did chemists begin to organize the known elements

6.1

How did chemists begin to organize the known elements?

Chemists used the properties of elements to sort them into groups

Chlorine, bromine, and iodine have very similar chemical properties. (Dobereiner, 1829)


Metals nonmetals and metalloids

6.1

Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids

  • Metals, Metalloids, and Nonmetals in the Periodic Table


Metals

6.1

Metals


Physical properties of metals
Physical Properties of Metals

  • Have a high luster (shiny)

  • Solidat room temperature

  • Are good conductors (of heat and electric current)

  • Are ductile (the ability to be pulled into a thin strand like wire)

  • Are malleable(the ability to be pressed or pounded in to a thin sheet)


Metals usage

6.1

Metals Usage

  • Uses of Iron, Copper, and Aluminum


Metals1

6.1

Metals

  • If a small amount of boron is mixed with silicon, the mixture is a good conductor of electric current. Silicon can be cut into wafers, and used to make computer chips.


Nonmetals

6.1

Nonmetals

  • .


Physical properties of nonmetals
Physical Properties of Nonmetals

  • Dull luster (not shiny)

  • Gas at room temperature (some are not a gas at room temperature)

  • Not ductile (the ability to be pulled into a thin strand like wire)

  • Insulator (does not conduct electricity)

  • Brittle (breaks and shatters easily)


Metalloids

6.1

Metalloids


Metalloids1
Metalloids

  • A metalloid generally has properties that are similar to those of metals and nonmetals.

  • The behavior of a metalloid can be controlled by changing conditions.

  • The most important use of metalloids is as of “semiconductors”, substances who can change the amount of electricity that they conduct

  • -- based on heat, light, etc. . .

  • -- very useful in computer chips


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