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Ruffin Beckwith. Senior Vice President World Golf Foundation. COACH. C. C ommunications. O. O. Juni O r G O lf. A. A lternative Facilities. C. C ollege Golf Opportunities. H. Researc. H. Regulation Round.

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Ruffin beckwith

Ruffin Beckwith

Senior Vice PresidentWorld Golf Foundation



C


Communications


O

O


JuniOrGOlf


A


Alternative Facilities


C


College Golf Opportunities


H



Regulation round
Regulation Round

  • A regulation round of golf is defined by one person who tees off in an authorized “start” on a regulation golf course. The round is not defined by the number of holes played or the fees paid.


Timothy w finchem

Timothy W. Finchem

Commissioner, PGA TOURChairman, World Golf Foundation


Dr joe beditz

Dr. Joe Beditz

President National Golf Foundation


Golf 20 20 consumer research findings
GOLF 20/20: Consumer Research Findings

Opportunities to Grow the Game


Goals
Goals

  • In 2000, GOLF 20/20 set forth two ambitious participation goals for the year 2020:

    • Increase the number of participants in the U. S. from 35 million to 55 million

    • Increase the number of rounds from 570 million to one billion.


Consumer research initiative
Consumer Research Initiative

  • To help strategize on how to achieve those objectives, unprecedented consumer research was conducted:

    • Phase I -- Participation and Interest Survey mailed to 100,000 U. S. households

    • Phase II – In depth follow-up surveys to 1,500 golfers and 2,000 non-golfers with interest


This consumer research was conducted to address several key objectives
This Consumer Research Was Conducted to Address Several Key Objectives:

  • Identify our best and most profitable customers.

  • Identify our best and most profitable prospects, and determine how they can be identified and located.

  • Understand what strategies can be implemented to help convert those prospects.

  • Provide a benchmark against which future progress will be measured


Consumer research team
Consumer Research Team

  • Paul Metzler: PGA of America

  • Ken Lovell: PGA TOUR

  • Joe Beditz, Jim O’Hara: NGF

  • World Golf Foundation

  • NFO WorldGroup


Golf participation in the united states
Golf Participationin the United States


Growth in golf participants since 1950
Growth in Golf Participants Since 1950

Baby Boomers coming of age

Tiger Woods emerges

30

Recession, declining income

Plenty of money for course development

25

20

Millions of golfers

15

CAGR = 4.3%

Arnold and Jack on TV

10

5

0

1950

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

Source: NGF

CAGR=Compound Annual Growth


Golf participation rates by decade
Golf Participation Rates by Decade

Average annual golf participation rates

11.7%

9.5%

6.5%

3.5%

1960s

1970s

1980s

1990s

Source: NGF


Growth in golfers 1950 2000
Growth in Golfers – 1950 - 2000

Millions of Golfers

30

25

20

15

10

5

0

1950

1965

1980

1995

2000

Source: NGF


Participation changes in the last 5 years
Participation Changes in the Last 5 Years

  • Over the past 5 years, the number of core and avid players are on the rise. Yet, the number of occasional golfers has dipped slightly.

3.4%

-0.8%

Occasional Golfers

Core

Golfers


Participation in 2001
Participation in 2001

  • The 2001 consumer research confirmed the existence of 36 million golf participants.

6.6

Millions of Participants

Avid

7.0

Core

36.0

11.8

Occasional

4.0

1.7

Juniors

Exclusive Alter. Facility Users

4.9

Exclusive Range Users

Total Golf Participants


Latent demand in 2001
Latent Demand in 2001

  • There are 40+ million people in the United States who express an interest in playing or playing more than they do now.

Millions of Prospects

Express Interest in Playing or Playing More

Express Interest and Fit Best Customer Profile

43.2

12.0

Good Prospects

Best Prospects


Jim o hara

Jim O’Hara

Vice President, ResearchNational Golf Foundation



The 20 80 rule does not apply to the golf industry
The 20/80 Rule Does Not Apply to the Golf Industry


Golfers playing 25 rounds annually account for three fourths of total rounds
Golfers Playing 25+ Rounds Annually Account For Three-Fourths of Total Rounds

Percent of Golfers

Percent of Rounds Played

6%

16%

Occasional

(1-7)

47%

Core (8-24)

27%

78%

Avid(25+)

26%

Source: Golf 20/20


Golfers spending 1 000 annually account for three fourths of total spending
Golfers Spending $1,000+ Annually Account For Three-Fourths of Total Spending

Percent of Golfers

Percent of Spending

25%

Spend <$1,000

70%

75%

Spend $1,000+

30%

Source: Golf 20/20


But not all avid golfers are best spenders and not all best spenders are avid golfers
But Not All Avid Golfers are Best Spenders and Not All Best Spenders are Avid Golfers

6.6 million

Avid Golfers (25+)

7.6 Million

Best Spenders ($1,000+)

2.5 Mil

4.1 Mil

3.5 Mil

Thus, there are 10+ Million

“Best Customers”

Source: Golf 20/20


The rule in the golf industry is 40 80
The Rule in the Golf Industry is 40/80 Spenders

Percent of Golfers

Percent of Rounds Played

Percent of Spending

15%

19%

Other Golfers

60%

85%

81%

Best Customers

40%

Source: Golf 20/20


Best customers are distinguishable
Best Customers Spenders Are Distinguishable


There is a distinct demographic profile
There is a Distinct Demographic Profile Spenders

Demographics

GenderMale 75%Female 25%

Age18-39 30%40-64 51%65+ 19%

Income<$50K 24%$50-74K 21%$75K+ 55%

Presence of ChildrenUnder 13 30%

13-18 24%

None 60%

Source: Golf 20/20


Most are recreational public golfers
Most Are Recreational Public Golfers Spenders

Golf Characteristics

Years Played<5 16%5-9 18%10-19 25%20+ 41%

Private Club MemberYes 27%No 73%

Average Score<85 15%85-99 38%100+ 47%

Source: Golf 20/20


They have distinct lifestyle characteristics
They Have Distinct Spenders Lifestyle Characteristics

  • Best Customers are distinguishable by their perceived athleticism and physical fitness, sports TV consumption, traveling, and investing.

Source: Golf 20/20


They have distinct lifestyle characteristics1
They Have Distinct Spenders Lifestyle Characteristics

How Best Customers Can Be Distinguished From Other Golfers

Best Golfers Views of Rank Themselves

1 Athletic

2 Sports TV Viewer

3 Frequent Flyer

4 Investor

5 Domestic Traveler

6 Cell Phone User

7 Foreign Traveler

8 Into Physical Fitness

Source: Golf 20/20




There are millions of solid prospects
There Are Millions of Solid Prospects Customers”

  • There are 12 Million Adults in the U.S. Who Fit The Best Customer Profile, Express Interest in Playing or Playing More, But Are Not Currently Best Customers

3

12

6

3

Former Golfers

Best Prospects

Current Golfers

Never Evers

Source: Golf 20/20


It does not take long to cultivate a best customer
It Does Not Take Long to Cultivate Customers”a Best Customer

Amount of Time It Took Best Customers To Become Committed to the Game from the Time They Started Playing the Game

2.8 years on Average

3+ years

< 3 months

26%

35%

Less than 1 Year53%

1-3 years

21%

3-12 mos

18%

Source: Golf 20/20


And growing the best customer base can have a dramatic impact on the industry
And Growing the Best Customer Base Can Have a Dramatic Impact on the Industry

The Addition of a New Best Customer Could Result in an Average of 8 Times the Number of Rounds and 6 Times the Amount of Money

Other Customer

Best Customer

Added Value

Rounds Played

48

8X

6

Annual Spending

6X

$1,700

$265

Source: Golf 20/20



On a national basis
On a National Basis Impact on

The Areas Highlighted Represent Above Average Concentrations of Adults Who Fit The Best Customer Profile

Source: Golf 20/20


And in small market groups
And In Small Market Groups Impact on

Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, NC

Source: Golf 20/20


Ken lovell

Ken Lovell Impact on

Director of Research and Development,PGA TOUR


Additional insights and key considerations
Additional Insights and Impact on Key Considerations


Be mindful of time constraints
Be Mindful of Time Constraints Impact on

  • Former Golfers Are Leaving Because of the Constraints of the Game on Their Time

Willingness to Spend 4+ Hours at the Course

Reasons Why Former Golfers Quit

Didn’t have time 62%

Family obligations 38%

Costs too much 29%

Health reasons 18%

No one to play with 16%

Didn’t play well 12%

73%

60%

38%

Other Golfers

Former Golfers

Best Customers

Source: Golf 20/20


Emphasize ball striking when teaching and help forge playing partnerships
Emphasize Ball Striking Impact on When Teaching and Help Forge Playing Partnerships

Factors Influencing Golf’s Best Rank Enjoyment of Golf Customers

1 Ball Striking 29%

2 Playing Partners 19%

3 Course Conditions 9%

4 Score 8%

5 Exercise 8%

6 Course Aesthetics 9%

7 Weather 9%

8 Competition 5%

9 Treatment from Staff 4%

100%

Source: Golf 20/20


Opportunities for industry growth focus on growing best customers
Opportunities for Industry Growth Impact on – Focus on Growing Best Customers

Best Customers

Other Golfers

35%

Former Golfers

31%

28%

23%

21%

19%

Ball Striking

Playing Partners


Consider lowering costs for beginners
Consider Lowering Costs Impact on For Beginners

Too Expensive

$117

$59

Getting Expensive

$55

$36

Good Value

$35

$24

Best Customers

Prospective Golfers

Source: Golf 20/20


Continue to fuel junior programs
Continue to Fuel Junior Programs Impact on

There is strong evidence to suggest that junior programs really pay off in the long run.

18 – 34 yr olds who started playing golf as a junior

Not Exposed to a Structured Program

Exposed to a Structured Program

58% Increase

Average Rounds Played

12

19

71% Increase

Average Household Spending/ Year

$608

$1,041

Source: Golf 20/20


Promote learning
Promote Learning Impact on

Percent Likely To Participate in

Link Up 2 Golf

46%

36%

Best Customers

Best Prospects

Source: Golf 20/20


Target women
Target Women Impact on

4.2 Million Female Best Prospects

65%

Men

75%

Women

35%

25%

Best Customers

Best Prospects


Recognize best customer potential in all groups
Recognize Best Customer Potential In All Groups Impact on

All Golfers

Women Golfers

Minority Golfers

Best Customers

35%

40%

42%

65%

Other Golfers

60%

58%


Dr joe beditz1

Dr. Joe Beditz Impact on

President National Golf Foundation


Key thoughts leading into monday and tuesday
Key Thoughts Impact on Leading Into Monday and Tuesday


Final remarks
Final Remarks Impact on

  • The stability of the golf industry is stronger than other industries given the 40/80 rule.

  • We have as many potential best customers as we do current best customers – and we can find them.

  • Best customers can be created quickly and the keys are ball striking and playing partners.

  • The industry should target prospects with efficient market level strategies.


Final remarks cont
Final Remarks Impact on (cont.)

  • Women are an important target group – there are more female best customer prospects than female best customers.

  • Affordability is the key to attracting new players.

  • Time is the key to retaining players.

  • For long term growth, there is nothing more important than introducing kids to the game through structured junior programs.

  • The Link Up 2 Golf concept is well received, favorably priced, and represents a good tool for recruiting both short term and long term growth prospects.


MONDAY Impact on


Ruffin beckwith1

Ruffin Beckwith Impact on

Senior Vice PresidentWorld Golf Foundation


Alternative Impact on Facilities


Mike hurdzan

Mike Hurdzan Impact on

Hurdzan and Fry Golf Course Design


Alternative facilities
Alternative Facilities: Impact on

What Are They?

  • Golf Ranges

  • Par Three Courses

  • Pitch & Putt Courses

  • Executive Courses

  • Courses of Non-traditional Hole Configuration


Alternative facilities1
Alternative Facilities: Impact on

What Do They Mean to the Industry?

  • Lots of Theories, Not Many Facts


Alternative facilities2
Alternative Facilities: Impact on

2001 Objectives

  • Quantify How Many Alternative Facilities There Are

  • Determine the Qualities That Make For Successful Alternative Facilities

  • Examine the Relationship Between Traditional and Alternative Facilities

  • Determine Consumer Attitudes Toward Alternative Facilities


Alternative facilities3
Alternative Facilities: Impact on

Today We’ll Learn the Results of Our Research From...

  • Dr. Peter Melvin, Sportometrics, on the facilities side

  • Jim O’Hara, NGF, on the consumer side


Peter melvin ph d bobby mccormick ph d

Peter Melvin PH.D. Impact on Bobby McCormick PH.D.

Sportometrics


Alternative golf facilities study
Alternative Golf Facilities Study Impact on

GOLF 20/20 commissioned Sportometrics to perform research on alternative golf facilities

  • Build an Alternative Golf Facilities Database

  • Determine successful features of alternative facilities

  • Analyze the relationship between alternative and traditional facilities


Golf 20 20 alternative golf facilities database
Golf 20/20 Alternative Golf Facilities Database Impact on

Database created by compiling data from the multiple data sources and eliminating duplicates

  • Golf Digest

  • Golf Magazine

  • Golf Range Association of America

  • National Golf Foundation

  • United States Golf Association


Golf 20/20 Alternative Golf Facilities Database Impact on

  • 5,542 alternative golf facilities in the United States

  • 5,312 alternative golf facilities open to the public, excluding military and private

  • 30.1 percent of all golf facilities in the United States are alternative; half are stand-alone golf ranges; and the other half have golf holes



Green fees rounds and age at alternatives
Green Fees, Rounds and Impact on Age at Alternatives

  • The average 18-hole Weekend Green Fee is $16.25

  • 28,920 average annual rounds played

  • 92 rounds per day on average

  • The average facility is 25.3 years old


Success at alternatives
Success at Alternatives Impact on

  • Golfers prefer newer and longer alternative facilities

  • Golfers pay and play more at facilities with ranges

  • Golfers pay more for facilities that accept tee times

  • Golfers pay more for facilities with a beverage cart, snack bar, and restaurant


Success at alternatives1
Success at Alternatives Impact on

  • Golfers pay more at facilities with a full bar

  • Golfers pay more for a facility with a dress code requiring a collared shirt and not allowing denim

  • Fees and average rounds per day are higher in regions where courses are closed some portion of the year because of weather. However, total rounds per year are higher in warm climate regions where clubs are open more days.


Relation of alternative and traditional facilities
Relation of Alternative and Traditional Facilities Impact on

Green fees and rounds are higher at traditional courses with lots of alternatives in close proximity

Green fees and rounds at alternatives are higher where there are more traditional facilities

Alternative and traditional facilities are complements, companions, and both components of a thriving golf market




Conclusions
Conclusions Traditional-Course Area

  • Alternative Golf Facilities are part of the overall golf market and golfing experience

  • The presence of Alternatives both aids and is aided by proximity to traditional 18-hole layouts

  • Overall Success of Golf should not exclude the important role played by Alternative Facilities


Jim o hara1

Jim O’Hara Traditional-Course Area

Vice President, ResearchNational Golf Foundation


Objectives
Objectives Traditional-Course Area

  • Participation at Alternative Facilities was studied to answer the following key questions:

    • Who plays at alternative facilities?

    • Why do golfers choose alternative facilities?

    • Are alternative facilities a stepping stone for beginner golfers?


Who plays at alternative facilities
Who Plays At Alternative Facilities? Traditional-Course Area


Regulation course players comprise the majority of alternative facility participation
Regulation Course Players Comprise the Traditional-Course AreaMajority of Alternative Facility Participation

4.1

Millions of Participants

9.9

Additional Golfers

2.6

Golf’s Best Customers

1.7

Exclusive Alternative Facility Users

1.5

6.7 Million Adult Regulation Course Golfers

Total Alternative Facility Participants

Juniors


And golf s best customers are also best customers at alternative facilities
And Golf’s Best Customers Are Also Best Customers at Alternative Facilities

Rounds Played at Alternative Facilities

Junior Golfers

3%

Best Customers

55%

Exclusive Alternative

25%

Remaining Customers

17%

Source: Golf 20/20


However the majority of regulation course players do not play at alternative facilities
However, The Majority of Regulation Course Players Do Not Play at Alternative Facilities

% of Golfers Who Have Played at an Alternative Facility in the Past 12 Months

Golf’s Best Customers

26%

Additional Golfers

27%

Junior

Golfers

38%

Source: Golf 20/20


And few of best customer rounds are played at alternative facilities
And Few of Best Customer Rounds Play at Alternative FacilitiesAre Played at Alternative Facilities

Rounds Played by Best Customers

Alternative 6%

Regulation

94%

Source: Golf 20/20


Why do golfers choose alternative facilities
Why Do Golfers Choose Alternative Facilities? Play at Alternative Facilities


Best customers use alternative facilities as a practice venue
Best Customers Use Alternative Facilities Play at Alternative FacilitiesAs A Practice Venue

Top Reasons to Play Alternative Facilities

Exclusive Alternative Facility Users

Golf’s Best Customers

Less Expensive than a Regulation Course (60%)

Easy to Get a Tee Time (50%)

Good Place to Practice My Short Game (40%)

Takes Less Time than a Regulation Course (36%)

Good Place to Practice My Short Game (64%)

Takes Less Time than a Regulation Course (43%)

Easy To Get a Tee Time (36%)

Less Expensive than a Regulation Course (31%)

Source: Golf 20/20


Are alternative facilities a stepping stone for beginner golfers
Are Alternative Facilities a Play at Alternative FacilitiesStepping Stone for Beginner Golfers?


Alternative facilities are an integral part of beginner rounds when readily available
Alternative Facilities Are An Integral Part of Beginner Rounds When Readily Available

Total Rounds Played

Alternative

Regulation

3

11

2

9

2

8

16

12

11

8

7

4

1999

2000

2001

1999

2000

2001

Beginners w/o Alternative Supply

Beginners with Alternative Supply (w/in 15 miles)

Source: Golf 20/20


Summary
Summary Rounds When Readily Available


Summary1
Summary Rounds When Readily Available

  • Regulation course players comprise the majority of Alternative Facility participation, and golf’s Best Customers are also Best Customers at Alternative Facilities.

  • However, the majority of Regulation Course players do not play at Alternative Facilities, and few of Best Customer rounds are played at Alternative Facilities.

  • Alternative Facilities are largely a practice venue for Best Customers, but are an integral part of rounds from beginner golfers when they are readily available.


Summary cont
Summary (cont.) Rounds When Readily Available

  • The consumer research does seem to suggest that Alternative Facilities are largely a compliment to regulation facilities, particularly for Best Customers:

    • Best customers play Alternative Facilities when they are practicing their short game or when they don’t have the time for a full round at a regulation facility

    • Few are playing because of the higher expense or lack of availability relative to regulation facilities

  • This may suggest that play at Alternative facilities would have been a range visit or some other non-golf activity if the Alternative Facility were not present.


  • Mike hurdzan1

    Mike Hurdzan Rounds When Readily Available

    Hurdzan and Fry Golf Course Design


    Alternative facilities assumptions
    ALTERNATIVE FACILITIES: ASSUMPTIONS Rounds When Readily Available

    That all participants in the Alternative Facility breakout sessions:

    • Endorse and support the GOLF 20/20 mission of growing the game.

    • Accept the new research as valid and a foundation for ongoing thinking.

    • Will focus on developing recommendations based on the following questions, or others with equal merit.


    Alternative facilities questions
    ALTERNATIVE FACILITIES: QUESTIONS Rounds When Readily Available

    • Do we have enough information on alternative facilities? Is any other research or data needed?

    • How can alternative and regulation facilities specifically work together to meet their separate but overlapping business objectives?

    • How can alternative facilities play a more meaningful and functional role at the following levels:

      • Entry – Junior

      • Practice/Improvement – Retention

      • Family – Other


    Alternative facilities questions1
    ALTERNATIVE FACILITIES: QUESTIONS Rounds When Readily Available

    • Should a special player development program be developed for alternative facilities? If so, what does it look like and how should it be implemented?

    • Are alternative facilities appropriately represented within the industry and are they aligned with the issues facing the game? If not, how do we address this issue?


    Junior golf
    Junior Golf Rounds When Readily Available

    • Adults 19-34 who were exposed to golf through a structured program are playing 50% more rounds and spending over 70% more on fees and equipment compared to those who were exposed to the game but not through a structured program.


    Junior golf1
    Junior Golf Rounds When Readily Available

    • Of every 10 kids exposed to the game through a structured program, six will become active adult golfers. Of every 10 kids exposed but not through a structured program, three will become active adult golfers.


    David fay

    David Fay Rounds When Readily Available

    USGA Executive Director GOLF 20/20 Executive Board


    Jessica turnwald

    Jessica Turnwald Rounds When Readily Available

    USGA Foundation


    Golf 20 20 junior initiative
    GOLF 20/20 Junior Initiative Rounds When Readily Available

    Communications Objectives:

    • Quantify the scope of junior golf in this country

    • Establish communication mechanisms that will enable and engage kids, their parents, and program administrators

    • Impact more kids through golf


    Golf 20 20 junior initiative1
    GOLF 20/20 Junior Initiative Rounds When Readily Available

    Strategies:

    • Develop, promote and maintain a master database of all junior programs in the U.S.

    • Develop and maintain a global junior golf website hosting the searchable database and featuring content for kids, parents and program administrators

    • Facilitate local/regional “summit” meetings for junior golf communities


    Golf 20 20 junior initiative2
    GOLF 20/20 Junior Initiative Rounds When Readily Available

    Progress Reports:

    • The Website

      • Developing a Brand/Logo

      • Virtual Tour of the Site

      • Phases

    • Junior Golf Summits

      • Sites

      • Successes


    Golf 20 20 junior initiative3
    GOLF 20/20 Junior Initiative Rounds When Readily Available


    Golf 20 20 junior initiative4
    GOLF 20/20 Junior Initiative Rounds When Readily Available

    Developing a Brand/Logo:

    • Family of logos

    • Stand-alone figure

    • Consistency of fonts

    • Dynamic personality

    • Versatility of character


    Golf 20 20 junior initiative5
    GOLF 20/20 Junior Initiative Rounds When Readily Available

    Phases:

    • Phase One - “November 12th Launch”

      • Development of Database

      • Registering Programs

      • Exhibiting Content Potential

    • Phase Two and beyond

      • Content Buildup

      • Kid-Friendly

      • Creative Interactions


    Golf 20 20 junior initiative6
    GOLF 20/20 Junior Initiative Rounds When Readily Available

    Junior Golf Summit Sites:

    • Philadelphia: November 2000

    • Monterey County: March 2001

    • North Florida (Ponte Vedra): July 28th

    • Southern California (LA): October 4th

    • Southwest (Albuquerque): October 20th

    • Texas (Ft. Worth): November 8th

    • Massachusetts (Boston): November 17th


    Golf 20 20 junior initiative7
    GOLF 20/20 Junior Initiative Rounds When Readily Available

    Junior Golf Summit Successes:

    • Positive Media Coverage

    • Distribution of Resources

    • Collaborative Communication

    • Displays of Organizational Leadership

    • Sharing of “Best Practices”

    • Follow-up and Action

    • It’s Beyond Junior Golf, It’s about Community


    Golf 20 20 junior initiative8
    GOLF 20/20 Junior Initiative Rounds When Readily Available

    Overall Needs Going Forward:

    • Widespread communication and content support of industry

    • Support of state golf associations, PGA sections, etc. in getting programs online to register

    • Promotion from within the industry

    • Continued vision and new alliances


    David shapiro

    David Shapiro Rounds When Readily Available

    USGA Foundation


    Golf 20 20 junior initiative9
    GOLF 20/20 Junior Initiative Rounds When Readily Available

    Breakout Session Objectives:

    • Inclusion of all kids

    • How to enhance current efforts

    • Multi-lateral expansion of current efforts

    • Future issues to be addressed

    • Need for action-oriented input and clear responsibilities


    Golf 20 20 junior initiative10
    GOLF 20/20 Junior Initiative Rounds When Readily Available

    Breakout Session Philosophy:

    • Emphasis is on objectives not affiliations

    • Taking stock of where we are and where we have the ability to go

    • Seizing a unique opportunity to hear all voices and to collaborate


    Golf 20 20 junior initiative11
    GOLF 20/20 Junior Initiative Rounds When Readily Available

    Breakout Session Agenda:

    • Reaction to Current Junior Initiatives

      • Website Review

      • Summits

    • New Concepts for Junior Initiatives


    Joe louis barrow jr

    Joe Louis Barrow, Jr. Rounds When Readily Available

    National Director, The First TeeSenior Vice President,World Golf Foundation


    Oversight committee
    Oversight Committee Rounds When Readily Available

    HonoraryChairman

    PresidentGeorgeBush

    Ty M. Votaw

    James H. Armstrong

    Timothy W. Finchem

    Jim L. Awtrey

    Judy Bell


    Public sector partnerships
    Public Sector Partnerships Rounds When Readily Available

    • National Association of County Officials

    • National League of Cities

    • National Recreation & Park Association

    • US Bureau of Land Management

    • US Conference of Mayors

    • US Department of Housing & Urban Development

    • US Drug Enforcement Administration

    • White House Office of Drug Policy

    • Local Housing Authorities

    • Local School Districts


    Allied partnerships
    Allied Partnerships Rounds When Readily Available

    • American Junior Golf Association

    • American Society of Golf Course Architects

    • Golf Course Builders Association of America

    • Golf Course Superintendents Association of America

    • National Golf Course Owners Association of America

    • National Golf Foundation

    • National Minority Golf Foundation

    • National Minority Junior Golf Scholarship Foundation

    • Tiger Woods Foundation


    Youth service partnerships
    Youth Service Partnerships Rounds When Readily Available

    • Police Athletic League

    • Boys & Girls Clubs of America

    • YMCA of the U.S.A.

    • Goodwill Industries


    Official suppliers
    Official Suppliers Rounds When Readily Available

    • Callaway Golf

    • Club Car Inc.

    • Coastal Netting and Steel Pole Company

    • Eagle One Golf Products

    • Electronic Arts

    • Greensmix

    • Kohler Company


    Official suppliers1
    Official Suppliers Rounds When Readily Available

    • Lesco, Inc.

    • PGA TOUR Design Services, Inc.

    • Piganato Group

    • Pursell Technologies

    • Redden Nets

    • Simplot Turf and Horticulture

    • Spalding Worldwide

    • Standard Golf Company


    Official suppliers2
    Official Suppliers Rounds When Readily Available

    • SynchroFlo

    • TaylorMade-adidas

    • The St. Paul Companies

    • The Toro Company

    • THOR GUARD Inc.

    • Titleist Footjoy Worldwide

    • TourTurf

    • Wittek Golf Supply Company


    Topics
    Topics Rounds When Readily Available

    • First Step of Phase II

    • Life Skills and Golf Experience

    • Facility Development

    • Chapter Services

    • Resource Development

    • Communications


    Mission statement
    Mission Statement Rounds When Readily Available

    • To impact the lives of young people around the world by creating affordable and accessible golf facilities to primarily serve those who have not previously had exposure to the game and its positive values.


    Phase ii goals
    Phase II Goals Rounds When Readily Available

    • 500,000 Young People

    • 250 Facilities

    • 500 Affiliates


    The first tee participation
    The First Tee Rounds When Readily AvailablePARTICIPATION

    (Thousands)


    The first tee facility development
    The First Tee Rounds When Readily AvailableFACILITY DEVELOPMENT

    *Estimated by year-end

    *


    The first tee affiliates
    The First Tee Rounds When Readily AvailableAFFILIATES


    Youth participation 2005
    Youth Participation Rounds When Readily Available(2005)

    (Thousands)


    Facility development 2005
    Facility Development Rounds When Readily Available(2005)


    Affiliates 2005
    Affiliates Rounds When Readily Available(2005)


    National association accomplishments
    National Association Accomplishments Rounds When Readily Available


    Life skills golf experience
    Life Skills & Golf Experience Rounds When Readily Available


    Life skills golf experience1
    Life Skills & Golf Experience Rounds When Readily Available

    • Chapters have embraced the Life Skills program as a key component of The First Tee

    • Regional Life Skills training sessions were attended by 90% of The First Tee chapters contracted as of April 1, 2001

    • Par and Birdie level materials including Instructor workbooks, summary cards for volunteers and yardage books for students were successfully utilized

    • 100 students and 30 site leaders participated in The First Tee 2nd Annual National Academy


    Facility development
    Facility Development Rounds When Readily Available


    Facility development1
    Facility Development Rounds When Readily Available

    • Regionally located Development Directors are now working closely in local communities

    • Local chapters helped to open 44 new facilities in 2001

    • Local chapters have created 74 new affiliate relationships

    • Changing chapter needs accommodated through newly created operating grants and disbursement guidelines

    • Newly formed chapters are being guided by prototype designs


    Regional development directors
    Regional Development Directors Rounds When Readily Available

    Jennifer

    Wollman

    Mark

    Lowry

    Leon

    Gilmore

    Henry

    Sandles

    CH

    Swan

    Western Region

    Mountain Region

    Midwest Region

    Northeast Region

    Southeast Region


    Snapshot of information

    Facility Profiles Rounds When Readily Available

    • 78 offering The First Tee experience

    • 53% are attached

    • 47% are stand alone

    Facility Configuration

    • 18% of total are 3 hole

    • 13% of total are 6 hole

    • 45% of total are 9 hole

    • 12% of total are 9+ hole

    • 8% of total are 18 hole

    • 5% of total are other

    Snapshot of Information


    Snapshot of information1
    Snapshot of Information Rounds When Readily Available

    Another Look

    • 76% of total are 3-9 hole

    • 87% of total are 3-9+ hole

    The First Tee is offering an alternative golf experience


    Snapshot of information2
    Snapshot of Information Rounds When Readily Available

    Chapter Finances

    • 59% of the total revenue is created from donations, contributions, grants, etc.

    • $310,000 is the average revenue produced

    • $375,000 is the average expense utilized at the facilities


    Snapshot of information3
    Snapshot of Information Rounds When Readily Available

    Rounds Utilization

    • On average total rounds played at each facility were approximately 18,000

    • 32% of the 18,000 were accounted for as The First Tee or youth rounds


    Chapter services
    Chapter Services Rounds When Readily Available

    • Facilities are utilizing the Participant Database

    • Chapters are tracking participants

    • The First Tee Card is being issued

    • Chapters are utilizing digital cameras to capture participant pictures

    • The First Tee clubs and balls are in play

    • Chapters will benefit from operational and comparative data being collected


    Snapshot of information4
    Snapshot of Information Rounds When Readily Available

    Participant Database and Profile

    • Distributed 48 computers

    • 58% are transmitting data

    • 5,139 The First Tee black and white cards were issued

    • 1,330 color photo cards were issued

    • 6,469 total cards issued

    • 78 facilities/chapters received clubs and balls


    Snapshot of information5
    Snapshot of Information Rounds When Readily Available

    Participant Database and Profile

    • 64,000 young people were exposed to the game through The First Tee

    • 6,347 are registered in the participant database


    Snapshot of information6
    Snapshot of Information Rounds When Readily Available

    2,555 reported information on gender

    • 71% were male

    • 29% were female


    Snapshot of information7
    Snapshot of Information Rounds When Readily Available

    2,877 Reported Information on Ethnicity

    • 46% were Caucasian

    • 19% were African American

    • 15% were Hispanic American

    • 9% were Asian American

    • .001% were Pacific Islander

    • 11% chose not to discuss


    Snapshot of information8
    Snapshot of Information Rounds When Readily Available

    3,220 Report Program Participation as Follows:

    • 74% Pre-par

    • 24% Par

    • 2% Birdie

    • .0003% Eagle


    Allocation of national resources
    Allocation of National Resources Rounds When Readily Available

    50% Chapter Grants

    6% Chapter Development

    30% Chapter Programs & Services

    14% Admin./Fundraising


    Communications
    Communications Rounds When Readily Available


    Communications1
    Communications Rounds When Readily Available

    • Refined a consistent message for the organization

    • Awareness of The First Tee among golf fans reaching 45% and 95% of those had a favorable opinion

    • Defined 9 core values of The First Tee

    • Opened The Learning Curve

    • Converted website to FrontPage format

    • Created new informational brochure

    • Publishing our 1st Annual Report


    Impact
    Impact Rounds When Readily Available


    Impact1
    Impact Rounds When Readily Available

    • The lives of the young people participating in The First Tee

    • The communities and leaders that have embraced The First Tee

    • The partnerships that have been created to make The First Tee a reality


    Partner
    Partner Rounds When Readily Available

    • Government

    • Private Sector

    • Youth Service Agencies

    • Existing Golf Organizations


    Develop
    Develop Rounds When Readily Available

    • Affordable and Accessible Golf Facilities

    • The Full Potential of Young People


    Value
    VALUE Rounds When Readily Available


    David pillsbury

    David Pillsbury Rounds When Readily Available

    Co-CEOAmerican Golf Corporation


    Will mann

    Will Mann Rounds When Readily Available

    Honorary Past PresidentPGA of America


    Gary stevenson

    Gary Stevenson Rounds When Readily Available

    OnSport


    Timeline
    Timeline Rounds When Readily Available

    • November ’00: Discussed at 20/20 Conference

    • February ’01: Raleigh area selected for pilot

    • March – May: Materials developed; meetings with Will Mann and area facilities

    • May 1: OnSport hired to execute program

    • May 15: Facility selection finalized

    • June 4:

      • PGA of America conducts “Instructor Orientation”

      • Link Up 2 Golf announced to the press and general public

    • June 19: First Class


    Program objectives
    Program Objectives Rounds When Readily Available

    • Can we attract and retain golfers?

    • Will the program work at different types of golf facilities?

    • Is the program designed properly?

    • What is the most effective way to market the program?

    • What is the most efficient way to expand?

    • What does it cost to acquire a new golfer?


    Program design
    Program Design Rounds When Readily Available

    • Provide an opportunity for new, infrequent, or former golfers to become engaged (or re-engaged) in golf.

    • Reduce factors which restrict or constrain participation:

      • Provide a low-cost introduction to the game

      • Create a comfortable environment by offering a relaxed, supportive learning experience

      • Introduce new players to other new players

      • Create a smooth transition from the range to the course

      • Provide ongoing opportunities to play in a non-intimidating environment


    Program components
    Program Components Rounds When Readily Available

    • $199 (rental equipment included)

    • Orientation for new players (optional)

    • Facility tour and course review

    • Six hours of instruction, including basic fundamentals of the golf swing and short game

    • Five rounds of golf

    • Range balls


    Facilities
    Facilities Rounds When Readily Available

    • Two golf ranges

    • Five Public/Semi-private

      • Two central to population centers

      • Three sites more remote

    • One private club


    Research
    Research Rounds When Readily Available

    • Registration Form

      • Database

    • Application Form

      • Attitudinal/Demographic/Golf Interest

    • Satisfaction Survey

      • Expectations/Satisfaction

    • Facility Survey

      • Program Design

    • Instructor Survey

      • Program Design


    Marketing
    Marketing Rounds When Readily Available

    • Call Center and Website launched

    • Print and radio advertising

    • Direct Sales

    • Flex funds

    • Public relations and celebrity involvement

    • Special events (New Golfer Day, Tournaments)


    Results
    Results Rounds When Readily Available

    6/15 – 9/15


    Participation
    PARTICIPATION Rounds When Readily Available

    Level of Facility Involvement

    • During the three-month test, 334 participants at eight facilities

      • Four facilities more than 50 participants each

      • Two facilities 30 to 50 participants each

      • Two facilities less than 10 participants each


    Participation1
    PARTICIPATION Rounds When Readily Available

    Participant Profile

    • 20% never played golf

    • 17% have only hit balls at a range

    • 25% only played a few times in their lives

    • 37% hardly ever read about or watch golf

    • 34% never watch tournament golf

    • 75% with income $25k - $100k

    • 90% college grads, 40% of those graduate degrees

    • 61% of participants are female


    Participation2
    PARTICIPATION Rounds When Readily Available

    Why Did They Participate?

    I have always wanted to learn to play golf 76.3%

    Because of the value of the program 9.5%

    To improve my game 3.9%

    To meet new people 3.4%

    My spouse, family, and friends play 3.0%

    For business reasons 2.2%

    Other 1.7%


    Participation3
    PARTICIPATION Rounds When Readily Available

    Participant Feedback

    • Level of comfort AT a golf facility

      • Before LU2G: 60% somewhat or very uncomfortable

      • After LU2G: 80% comfortable or very comfortable

    • Level of comfort ON a golf course

      • Before LU2G: 64% somewhat or very uncomfortable

      • After LU2G: 63% comfortable or very comfortable

    • 92% rate overall program value “Very Good or Excellent”

    • 91.8% would highly recommend it to others

    • 73% plan on purchasing golf equipment in the next year: 45% of those at the LU2G facility, 33% at a discount store, 8% at another club


    Facilities1
    FACILITIES Rounds When Readily Available

    Two Alternative Facilities

    • Very active marketing the program (37% of all participants)

      • Enthusiastic from the beginning

      • Conducted New Golfer Days

      • Referred all lesson requests to the program

    • Made own arrangements for the five rounds of golf

    • Sold one to two sets of clubs per class of eight


    Facilities2
    FACILITIES Rounds When Readily Available

    Five Public/Semi-Private Facilities

    • Varying degrees of enthusiasm

      • One facility had 21% of total participant count

      • Other four combined had 24% of the total

    • Competing instruction programs weakened interest

    • Late start diminished effectiveness

    • Success totally dependent upon the willingness of the leadership


    Facilities3
    FACILITIES Rounds When Readily Available

    Private Country Club

    • Initial reluctance

    • Late start; course under renovation

    • Promotion targeted to non-playing members

      • Put a blurb in newsletter

      • Followed immediately by a mailer that was an invitation to learn golf or get more engaged in the game

    • 62 total participants; couldn’t accommodate an additional 40 (signed up for Spring ’02)

    • Results will become one of the golf pros’ accomplishments in his annual report


    Facilities4
    FACILITIES Rounds When Readily Available

    What They Said

    • Price was right: Great value, Ample compensation

    • Materials “very good”, but too much paperwork

    • Scheduling is difficult, requires flexibility

    • Call Center ineffective

    • Need local Link Up 2 Golf liaison to “keep us going”

    • Would like to continue in the program - several will do it “with or without you”


    Instructor feedback
    Instructor Feedback Rounds When Readily Available

    • Overall satisfaction with program was “Very good”

    • All instructors expect additional lessons to graduates

    • 80% of instructors expect to sell equipment to graduates: instructors estimate 25% of participants will buy clubs

    • The ideal lesson size is six per group, not eight

    • Difficult to get new golfers confident enough to play in four 90-minute lessons


    Marketing1
    MARKETING Rounds When Readily Available

    Source Of LU2G Information

    38% Heard about it from someone they knew

    18% Newspaper or magazine

    17% At the golf facility

    18% Other sources (TV news, company e-mailer, door-to-door, brochure drop, speeches, etc )

    8% Radio ad


    Marketing2
    MARKETING Rounds When Readily Available

    What Worked

    • Direct mail impact at private club

      • 950 pieces, 62 signed up (40 more deferred to spring)

    • Celebrity involvement for PR (Immediate attention from media)

    • Direct sales

      • Corporations

      • Executive Women’s Golf Association

      • Rotary Clubs

      • Municipal recreation centers

      • Restaurants

    • Flex-fund and Special Events

      • New Golfer Day: three different locations, approx. 130 attended, 28 signed up for the program

      • Tournaments: five scheduled, three occurred, 100+ Golfers


    Marketing3
    MARKETING Rounds When Readily Available

    What Didn’t Work

    • Advertising: Print and radio were helpful but inefficient.

    • Publicity: It is not a news story without celebrity involvement.


    Future considerations
    Future Considerations Rounds When Readily Available


    Program design issues
    Program Design Issues Rounds When Readily Available

    • Assess the opportunity to offer a stratified learning progression (novice, beginner, intermediate) where participants enter at their level of comfort

    • Start earlier in the Spring

    • Orientation should be mandatory

    • Pricing may vary at different types of facilities

    • Participants want more information on how to purchase equipment as part of the program


    Facilities5
    Facilities Rounds When Readily Available

    • Facilities should be selected to participate after an application process rather than recruited

    • There seems to be a significant latent demand at family-oriented private clubs

    • There is a significant interest in building this program at military golf facilities, such as 80 Air Force facilities

    • Link Up 2 Golf must make it “easy” for the facilities to implement this program


    Marketing4
    Marketing Rounds When Readily Available

    • The entire marketing plan must be built in cooperation with the selected facilities and take advantage of their respective strengths

    • Link Up 2 Golf must provide collateral materials and creative/placement of any advertising that supports facilities’ marketing plans

    • Good old fashioned sales calls on group and corporate business within a 15 mile radius of facilities are important


    What next
    What Next? Rounds When Readily Available

    • Consider expanding via Link Up 2 Golf clusters; take advantage of economies of scale

    • A cluster can be 48 facilities in a 200-mile radius (six markets, eight facilities each)

    • Local management is essential

      • PGA/LPGA representation

      • LU2G Management

        • Execution

        • Sales and marketing


    What next1
    What Next? Rounds When Readily Available

    • Participating facilities should average 150 LU2G participants in calendar year

    • Research and Economic modeling in 2002

      • Cost of LU2G participant

      • Retention rates

      • Value of new golfer


    Lu2g breakout
    LU2G Breakout Rounds When Readily Available

    • What is the value of a new golfer?

    • What should the structure of Link Up 2 Golf be, going forward

    • How should it expand?

    • How can we implement the Private Club model?


    TUESDAY Rounds When Readily Available

    See breakout results


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