Mini lesson textual evidence
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Mini-Lesson Textual Evidence. 7.RL.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Terms to Know. Textual Evidence = details you retrieve from a story Analyze= examine Explicit= clearly stated

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Mini-Lesson Textual Evidence

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Mini lesson textual evidence

Mini-LessonTextual Evidence

7.RL.1Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.


Terms to know

Terms to Know

Textual Evidence = details you retrieve from a story

Analyze= examine

Explicit= clearly stated

Implicit=not clearly stated

Inference= an educated guess based on

facts from the story and your own experiences

Prediction= a type of inference where you use evidence to

guess what a character will do in a future part of the story.

Cite = to quote or refer to

Direct Quote= the exact words a person says


Mini lesson textual evidence

Textual Evidence7.RL.1Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the textsays explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

In order to find textual evidence, you have analyze what you read and find important details. You have to read a bit slower, or even reread a section of a text to find details. Some textual evidence is explicit,and other textual evidence is implicit.

Explicit detail:

Ex: “Jesse was excited about going to the fair.”

- The story tells you Jesse is excited and why.

Implicit detail:

The story doesn’t specifically say.

You might have to make an inference, or an educated guess. You have to look for details in the story, combine then with your own knowledge, and make a guess.


Mini lesson textual evidence

Textual Evidence7.RL.1Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Implicit detail:

Is not clearly stated.

You might have to make an inference, or an educated guess. You’ll have to look for details in the story, combine them with your own knowledge, and make a guess.

Ex:

After his dad had gone upstairs, Pete clenched his fists and stomped out of the room to go get a bucket and fill it with soapy water. His dad had just told him they were having company that evening and that Pete had to help out by doing some extra chores. Pete had finished all of his homework in study hall that day and had planned on spending the afternoon reading his new comic book, not mopping floors and dusting shelves.


Mini lesson textual evidence

Textual Evidence7.RL.1Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

After his dad had gone upstairs, Pete clenched his fists and stomped out of the room to go get a bucket and fill it with soapy water. His dad had just told him they were having company that evening and that Pete had to help out by doing some extra chores. Pete had finished all of his homework in study hall that day and had planned on spending the afternoon reading his new comic book, not mopping floors and dusting shelves.


Mini lesson textual evidence

Citing Textual Evidence7.RL.1Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

When you cite textual evidence, you quote a piece of the writing. In order to quote it, you have to write down exactly what the person said. You cannot change anything! You have to put quotation marks around what the person said.


Mini lesson textual evidence

Citing Textual Evidence7.RL.1Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.


Mini lesson textual evidence

Example of Citing Textual Evidence7.RL.1Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.


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