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International Day for Street Children 12 th April 2011. Overview. 3 What are these guidelines for? International Day for Street Children vision Context and supporting information 5 Objectives and key messaging Creative elements Creative guidelines Example photos

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overview
Overview

3 What are these guidelines for?

  • International Day for Street Children vision

Context and supporting information

5 Objectives and key messaging

  • Creative elements
  • Creative guidelines
  • Example photos

9-10 Copy blocks

11 Examples of how you might promote the Day

12 Timeline of central activity

13 CSC members – how to get involved

14 Members’ activity

Appendix (see attachment docs):

15-16 Detailed Louder Together campaign outline

17-20 Q&As

21-23 Stats (short version – contact CSC for full version)

24 Members’ monitoring form

2

what are these guidelines for
What are these guidelines for?

These guidelines have been designed by the Consortium for Street Children

for use in support of the International Day for Street Children. All collateral can ONLY be used to promote the International Day for Street Children.

The guidelines provide everything you should need to publicise and promote the International Day; from logos to copy blocks to activation ideas. You can download any of the creatives/copy included in these guidelines from the respective word/image files stored on the CSC website.

For more information, please contact Leonora Borg [email protected]

3

international day vision
International Day: Vision

The International Day for Street Children: Louder Together is a campaign to give a louder voice to the millions of street children all around the world so their rights cannot be ignored. Governments need to listen. We want to help make this happen. We must give street children a voice. Together we are louder and have more impact so we are asking everyone to Raise your Voices for Street Children.

What does this mean?

That children living and / or working on the street worldwide have a voice (able to participate in matters which affect them) and the same opportunities as all children to prevention, protection, participation and provision as outlined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (based on the 4 fundamental rights: non-discrimination; best interests of the child; right to life, survival and development; and respect for the views of the child). The International Day is a tool for helping realise the rights of street children worldwide (see appendix for full policy outline)

Supporting Information

The International Day for Street Children is led by CSC, supported by corporate partner Aviva and CSC’s members. CSC is the leading international member-based network dedicated to advocating, promoting and campaigning for the rights of street-involved children, they have 60 members working in over 130 countries across the world. The Day will take place on the 12th April 2011; we then hope that this date will continue to mark International Day of the Street Child each year.

objective of the day and key messaging
Objective of the Day and Key Messaging

To raise awareness of street children as a global issue; their lack of voice. Together we are louder and have more impact so we are asking everyone to:

Key message:

So their rights cannot be ignored.

creative elements

Campaign

Name

Twibbon

N.B. For instructions on use, please see page 11

Language

Online banner

Branding device

TBC: Purpose / CSC

Creative elements

Please note: contact [email protected] if you have problems downloading these

6

creative guidelines
Creative guidelines

Colour palette

Typeface

Clear space and positioning

7

example photos
Example photos

Note: all photos are ©Marcus Lyon. Any photo used must acknowledge the photographer and can only be used to help celebrate the International Day for Street Children.

©Marcus Lyon

copy blocks
Copy blocks

Copy blocks are standard pieces of text which incorporate the key messages we want to deliver about the International Day for Street Children. They can be used by any organisation in their communications about the campaign.

Strapline:Raise your voice for street children

37 words

The International Day for Street Children: Louder Together is launched on 12th April, a new campaign to give a louder voice to the millions of street children all around the world so their rights cannot be ignored.

75 words

The International Day for Street Children: Louder Together is launched on 12th April, a new campaign to give a louder voice to the millions of street children all around the world so their rights cannot be ignored. Governments need to listen. We want to help make this happen. We must give street children a voice. Together we are louder and have more impact so we are asking everyone to Raise your Voices for Street Children.

132 words

The International Day for Street Children: Louder Together is launched on 12th April, a new campaign to give a louder voice to the millions of street children all around the world so their rights cannot be ignored. Governments need to listen. We want to help make this happen. We must give street children a voice. Together we are louder and have more impact so we are asking everyone to Raise your Voices for Street Children.

The International Day is being celebrated across the globe: by street children in Morocco, Uganda, Ethiopia, Guatemala and India; school children in the UK; students in Ireland; the Consortium for Street Children and its 60 members in over 130 countries; Aviva in the 28 countries in which it operates; and politicians in Tanzania and the UK.

9

copy blocks10
Copy blocks

Copy blocks are standard pieces of text which incorporate the key messages we want to deliver about the International Day for Street Children. They can be used by any organisation in their communications about the campaign.

250 words

The International Day for Street Children: Louder Together is launched on 12th April, a new campaign to give a louder voice to the millions of street children all around the world so their rights cannot be ignored. Governments need to listen. We want to help make this happen. We must give street children a voice. Together we are louder and have more impact so we are asking everyone to Raise your Voices for Street Children.

The International Day is being celebrated across the globe: by street children in Morocco, Uganda, Ethiopia, Guatemala and India; school children in the UK; students in Ireland; the Consortium for Street Children and its 60 members in over 130 countries; Aviva in the 28 countries in which it operates; and politicians in Tanzania and the UK.

All countries have signed and ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (other than the USA and Somalia) and have a legal obligation to work towards ensuring that all children’s rights are integrated into national law. The Convention sets out every child’s right to protection, participation, provision and prevention from harm. It is universally recognised that all children should have these rights realised; however many government policies and practices still do not include street children.

The International Day is supported by Aviva, the world’s sixth largest insurance group, as part of their global Street to School programme which aims to help 500,000 street children get back into education or training over the next five years.

10

slide11

Examples of how you might promote the Day

Website page

Twitter

Facebook Twibbon

International Day for Street Children

12th April

CSC

@streetchildren London, UK and worldwide

The International Day for Street Children: Louder Together is launched on 12th April, a new campaign to give a louder voice to the millions of street children all around the world so their rights cannot be ignored.

How to use the Twibbon on Facebook: go to http://twibbon.com/cause/Int-Day-for-Street-Children/facebook and click on ‘set as my profile picture’

Direct your followers to the CSC Twitter page (‘streetchildren’) on the Day which will be focusing on The International Day and/or retweet CSC tweets on your own Twitter pages.

For Twitter users, the Twibbon will be automatically added to your profile picture if you go to http://twibbon.com/cause/Int-Day-for-Street-Children

11

timeline of central activity
Timeline of central activity
  • National Theatre event for key decision makers (invite only)
  • Twitter & Facebook updates
  • Website: www.streetchildren.org.uk/internationalday
  • Media interviews with CSC CEO
  • Member-led activities including parties with street children, sleep-outs and using the Day to back current campaigns
slide13

Put the International Day logo on your website

  • Let your partner projects and organisation’s supporters know about the International Day – including via Twitter and Facebook (please try to use copyblock), both following CSC’s International Day twitter page and your own organisation’s
  • Use the International Day twibbon on Facebook and Twitter
  • Send CSC tweets, photos, videos, case studies, street child research and articles between now and 12th April

Optional ideas:

  • Hold an event to mark the International Day
  • Encourage schools you work with to celebrate the Day
  • Send a press release to media (outside UK only)
  • Link current organisational campaigns and events to the International Day
slide14

How get involved:

Raise your voice for street children so that their rights cannot be ignored by...

JOIN US – Web:www.streetchildren.com Facebook: International Day for Street Children

Twitter:@streetchildren Twibbon: Int. Day For Street Children

csc members activities
CSC Members’ activities
  • Groups of people can raise money, or simply raise awareness, by getting together and raise their voices for street children.
  • The current planned activity is as follows:
  • Hope Foundation: Sleep-out in Ireland, library reading and youth-centred workshops on child rights
  • Street Kids Direct, Moroccan Children’s Trust, Retrak: Celebrations with street children in Guatemala, Honduras, Ethiopia, Uganda and Morocco
  • Caretakers of the Environment: Meetings with local government, social welfare department and NGOs to discuss more coordinated support for street children in Tanzania; street party for street children
  • Latin American Foundation for the Future: Engaging schools in making some noise for street children
  • Street Kids International: Using the Day to re-engage supporters and highlight their forthcoming exhibition on street children
  • Retrak: Awareness raising event in Manchester
  • Other members have said they plan to celebrate the Day – more information to follow shortly! Please keep me informed about how you will be celebrating the Day: [email protected]

15

appendix detailed campaign outline notes
Appendix: detailed campaign outline notes
  • What we mean by street children:

Children at risk of going onto the streets

Children who work on the streets

Children who live and work on the streets

  • What we mean by voice:

That children living and / or working on the street worldwide have a voice (able to participate in matters which affect them) and the same opportunities as all children to prevention, protection, participation and provision as outlined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (based on the four fundamental rights: non-discrimination; best interests of the child; right to life, survival and development; and respect for the views of the child). The International Day is a tool for helping realise the rights of street children worldwide.

appendix q as the campaign
Appendix: Q&As: the campaign

Section 1: The Campaign

What is the International Day for Street Children?

On 12th April the International Day for Street Children will be launched, as part of the Louder Together campaign to give a louder voice to the millions of street children all around the world so their rights cannot be ignored. The International Day is an occasion for everyone to be Louder Together to raise awareness of street children and to give street children a voice and platform for expressing themselves.

The International Day is being celebrated across the globe: by street children in Morocco, Uganda, Ethiopia, Guatemala and India; school children in the UK; students in Ireland; the Consortium for Street Children and its 60 members in over 130 countries; Aviva in the 28 countries in which it operates; and politicians in Tanzania and the UK.

The International Day is supported by Aviva, the world’s sixth largest insurance group, as part of their global Street to School programme which aims to help 500,000 street children get back into education or training over the next five years.

What is Louder Together?

Louder Together is a campaign to give a louder voice to the millions of street children all around the world. Governments need to listen. We want to help make this happen. We must give street children a voice so that their rights cannot be ignored. Collectively our voices are louder and have more impact so we are asking everyone to join together and Raise your Voice for Street Children.

All countries have signed and ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (other than the USA and Somalia) and have a legal obligation to work towards ensuring that all children’s rights are integrated into national law. The Convention sets out every child’s right to protection, participation, provision and prevention from harm (based on the 4 fundamental rights: non-discrimination; best interests of the child; right to life, survival and development; and respect for the views of the child). It is universally recognised that all children should have these rights realised; however many government policies and practices still do not include street children.

Louder Together will be a three year campaign led by the Consortium for Street Children (CSC) and its members using the International Day for Street Children to highlight the campaign’s aims of giving street children a voice and realising their rights.

Why is the International Day for Street Children on 12th April?

The date has been chosen so as to not coincide with any other UN day and to remain separate from the UN Children’s Day.

Who came up with the idea?

The Consortium for Street Children (CSC) advocated launching the International Day for Street Children with the support of many of their members. CSC is the leading international member-based network dedicated to advocating, promoting and campaigning for the rights of street-involved children, they have 60 members working in over 130 countries across the world.

Who is running this campaign?

CSC will be leading on the International Day for Street Children and Aviva is the lead corporate sponsor. However, the International Day for Street Children is not ‘owned’ by any organisation and aims to stand as an independent Day which can be celebrated by everyone.

appendix q as continued
Appendix: Q&As (continued)

Section 1: The Campaign (continued)

Is this just happening in the UK?

No, CSC members, Aviva partner charities and others are going to be celebrating the International Day worldwide including in Guatemala, India, Ireland, Tanzania, Honduras and Morocco. For example, sleep outs will be taking place in Ireland and street child parties in Tanzania and Guatemala. All of these events will feed into the International Day for Street Children Twitter and Facebook pages and the International Day website so that the voices of street children are amplified.

Why is the International Day being launched in the UK?

CSC’s head office is in the UK as are many of its members. However, their focus is international and the day will be celebrated globally thanks to CSC’s members working in over 130 countries and Aviva, the main corporate supporter behind this campaign, promoting it across the 28 countries in which it operates.

What are you hoping to achieve from this Day?

In 2011 the Day is to raise awareness of street children through international events and media coverage which ensures the voices of street children are heard. Street children need to be on national governments’ policy agendas and their specific needs recognised and addressed.

Why is the International Day for Street Children important when there is already a UN day to celebrate children’s rights?

CSC recognises the importance of, and has participated in, the UN Children’s Day which focuses on children’s rights, held every year on 20th November. However, as the Day encompasses the rights of all children it tends to drown out the particular needs and rights of the most vulnerable and marginalised children.

Street children are very difficult to reach as they spend a large proportion of time on the streets and face a plethora of issues such as violence, sexual abuse, drug addiction, prostitution, child labour, health issues and a lack of education. They therefore require targeted interventions and specific policy and international focus. Similarly the UN Day of Persons with Disabilities celebrates the particular issues facing disabled people, which are not gaining attention in the wider MDG and UN debates.

How will the Day gain UN recognition?

We hope that the International Day for Street Children will become a UN-recognised Day within three years. It usually takes three years to become a UN-recognised day. To achieve this it must go through a UN General Assembly and have the backing of a UN agency. CSC has an opportunity to raise this at the upcoming UN Human Rights Council street children discussion in March 2011 to gain policy maker support.

Why is Danny Boyle involved?

Danny Boyle won his Best Director Oscar for the extraordinary film Slumdog Millionaire, which did so much to lift the lid on the traumas and harsh realities faced by slum children in India for millions of viewers worldwide. This summer Danny Boyle is directing a production of Frankenstein at the National Theatre. The 12th April falls in the middle of the play’s run and we were delighted when he agreed to lend his support to the launch of the International Day for Street Children.

How much are you paying him to support the day?

Nothing! It is Danny Boyle’s choice to give his endorsement and support for this campaign, he is not being paid.

appendix q as street children
Appendix: Q&As: street children

Section 2: Street Children

Who do you consider to be a street child?

It can be hard to get a single definition of street children, but the term is commonly used to describe the needs of:

Children who are at risk of turning to the streets

Children who work on the streets

Children who live on the streets.

Sometimes the term street-involved children is used by NGO’s and in some countries they refer to the children as runaways.

How many street children are there?

 The actual number is hard to tie down but the last estimated figures, still used today, come from UNICEF back in 2005. Figures of 100 million are commonly cited, but NGOs feel this number is insufficiently quantified. It also does not take into account the different ‘types’ of street child – from those at risk of going onto the streets to those living there.

Why should I support this Day instead of others?

Street children are one of the most unheard and unsupported groups of children. They regularly slip though the gaps in both policy and practice. Policy makers must recognise that street children deserve to have the same rights as all children, which will require tailored support.

NGOs working on the ground are increasingly seeing girls giving birth whilst on the street, giving rise to an alarming number of street babies -‘2nd generation’ of street children, who have never known a different kind of life. Policy changes supporting organisations working with street children can and are beginning to make a difference. But we need your help to build a movement for change. If enough people get involved, add their voice to the campaign and help raise awareness, policy makers will have to listen.

How do these street child issues fit with the MDGs?

Street children fit into all eight MDGs because the issues they face are so broad. However, the key two MDGs are one and two.

MDG 1: End poverty and hunger – street children are at the most extreme end of the poverty scale, often with no access to food, shelter, education or healthcare. They are often invisible and unheard, with few interventions to support them out of the poverty cycle. Many street children live off scraps of food with no knowledge of where the next meal will come from

MDG 2: Universal education – education provides stability and opportunity to children in a safe environment. However, for street children school is rarely an option – some cannot afford it (even free schooling usually requires a matriculation fee and stationary), others are forced to work and others unable to cope due to the multitude of issues they are faced with on a daily basis.

appendix q as aviva
Appendix: Q&As: Aviva

Section 3: Aviva and the International Day for Street Children

Why is an insurance company involved in this type of event?

Aviva is committed to improving the lives of street children through its Street to School corporate responsibility programme and has 17 partners already around the world. Aviva’s Street to School programme is the group’s first international cause partnership programme. Customers come to Aviva to provide “prosperity and peace of mind for themselves and their families, something lacking in the lives of millions of street children and their families worldwide. Aviva knows they can’t help street children everywhere, but want to help as many as they can to realise and fulfil their potential.

Aviva is a corporate supporter with CSC, supporting their work in research, advocacy and best practice.

How is Aviva supporting the International Day?

Aviva is committed to helping CSC on their journey towards having an official Day for street children. As well as helping to fund a series of launch activities in 2011, Aviva is also working to raise the profile of the International Day with its own businesses around the world, linking it to the international Street to School programme and its You Are the Big Picture marketing campaign.

What’s Aviva’s association with street children?

In 2009 Aviva announced its first international charity partnership programme to run across its businesses worldwide. Aviva’s Street to School programmes aim to help 500,000 children living and working on the streets get back into some form of education and training. Aviva has 17 charity partnerships within the Street to School programme. By the end of 2010, completing their first full year of Street to School activity, through its charity partners, Aviva has helped 128,000 children.

What is Street to School?

Aviva’s Street to School programmes around the world aim to help children living and working on the streets get back into some form of education and training. Aviva aims to help 500,000 street children over the next five years fulfil their potential. They currently have 17 charity partners as part of their Street to School programme worldwide.

How much is Aviva investing in Street to School?As a group Aviva has agreed to invest at least 50% of annual charitable giving budgets to Street to School programmes, but in 2010, the first full calendar year of action, the company and its employees, business partners and customers have actually given significantly more.

Aviva has set a target of impacting 500,000 street children over the next five years. So far they have helped 128,000. This is the most important measurement of success for Aviva.

appendix statistics
Appendix: Statistics
  • Global
  • In 1989, UNICEF estimated 100 million children were growing up on urban streets around the world. 14 years later UNICEF reported: ‘The latest estimates put the numbers of these children as high as 100 million’. And even more recently: ‘The exact number of street children is impossible to quantify, but the figure almost certainly runs into tens of millions across the world. It is likely that the numbers are increasing’ . The 100 million figure is still commonly cited, but has no basis in fact .
  • Africa
  • A survey from Child Hope found that 95 per cent of girls living on the streets of Ethiopia experienced sexual exploitation
  • Around 1 million children are believed to be on the streets of Egypt, most in Cairo and Alexandria.
  • In Kenya Girls are forced to resort to prostitution in order to get clothes or food, earning as little as 10 or 20 KSH ($0.30-0.50) for each client.
  • Over 95% of the children on the streets of Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria, have been stigmatised as "witches" by pastors and abandoned to live on the streets by their parents.
  • A ‘headcount’ of street children and mothers in Accra, the capital of Ghana, found 21,140 street children, 6,000 street babies, 7,170 street ‘mothers’ under the age of 20 and14,050 urban poor children (most likely at high risk of coming to the street).
  • There are an estimated 10– 12,000 homeless children in South Africa. Children find their way on to the streets because of poverty, overcrowding, abuse, neglect, family disintegration and HIV/AIDS.
  • More than half of the boys interviewed in a Rwanda study and more than three-quarters of the girls, including 35% of those under ten, admitted they were sexually active; 63% of the boys said they had forced a girl to have sex with them; 93% of the girls reported having been raped.
  • In Malawi, a 1999 study found that the word ‘vagabond’ was used to describe 8% of young offenders, which the study noted was “a term… representing obvious cases of street children.
  • In 2003, approximately 110 infants were abandoned on the streets of Khartoum, Sudan, every month, with 50% dying within hours.
  • In Brazzaville, Congo, almost 50% of street children are orphans.

Note: CSC has a full stats sheets with all references. Please contact CSC if you would like a copy of the complete stats sheet

appendix statistics23
Appendix: Statistics
  • Asia
  • An estimated 18 million street children live in India, this is the largest amount of anywhere in the world.
  • A study in India, found that almost half the girls told the researchers that they wished they were boys.
  •  In Pakistan, 78% of the beggar girls were 12 to 15 years of age
  • Of an estimated 400,000 street children in Bangladesh, nearly 10% have been forced into prostitution for survival.
  • In Cambodia there are an estimated 616,023 working children aged between 5 and 17 years and 2,000 street children in Phnom Penh. A further 15,000 children, while not homeless, spend more than six hours a day scavenging and begging.
  • One NGO in China estimated in 2001 that there are 150,000 street children.
  • In Indonesia it is estimated that there are 170,000 street children.
      • In a study undertaken in the Lao People\'s Democratic Republic, 44% of street children reported incidents of physical abuse.
      • It is estimated that between 15-20% of street children in Vietnam are HIV Positive.
      • In Pokara, Nepal, 80% of the boys living on the streets and 90% of the girls were sexually abused by hotel and restaurant owners and by people in places of work. Junkyard owners, older boys in the group, friends, local people, and tractor drivers were also among the perpetrators.
  • Europe
  • A report by the Children’s Society in the UK found that 100,000 young people run away in the UK each year; 1 in 6 young runaways sleep rough.
  •  A report estimated that the number of working street children in St. Petersburg, Russia, to be between 10,000-16,000 including: 50-70% of the total number of street children are under 13; they collect bottles and refuse, picking and selling berries and mushrooms; 10-30% are involved in illicit activities; working street children under 18 involved in prostitution account for 20%; 77.9% are involved in labour which is dangerous to their health.
  • According to local authorities in Kharkiv, Ukraine, it is estimated that there are circa 600+ children sleeping on the streets. It is estimated that 300,000 children are outside the school system in Ukraine and no one knows where they are. Some of the teenagers have been on the streets for 7-8 years. Orphanages in Ukraine say that 97% of children leaving their institutions become homeless.
  • About 2,500 children in Georgia have turned to the street to earn money either by begging or prostituting themselves.
  • There are at least 2,000 street children in Bucharest, Romania, and 5,000 in the wholecountry. 42% of the children were sexually abused between the ages of 6 and 12.

Note: CSC has a full stats sheets with all references. Please contact CSC if you would like a copy of the complete stats sheet

appendix statistics24
Appendix: Statistics
  • Americas
  • In Canada, a research study found that 61% of street children had witnessed family abuse and the same number had been physically abused; 55% females and 15% males reported that they had been a victim of sexual abuse
  • There are an estimated 1 to 2 million street-involved youth in USA.
  • A study in Peru found that 97% of street children use drugs.
  • A report in Bolivia found that 75% of street children are 12 years old, 25% aged 3 to 11.
  • In 2008-2009 a child was abandoned in Guatemala City every 4 days. Most were babies.
  • NGOs working in Guatemala say that street children have an average life expectancy of around four years on the street.
  • Of 143 homeless children interviewed in Honduras, 100% had at least one sexually transmitted disease, and 48.1% had been sexually abused by a member of their family.
  •  In Brazil 4,611 street children were murdered between 1988-1990. In 1993, eight children and adolescents were killed in a shooting near the Candeleria church in Rio. Between 1993-96 juvenile court statistics showed over 3,000 11 to 17 year olds met with violent deaths in Rio. The majority believed to have been murdered by death squads, the police or other types of gangs. In Sao Paulo, for example, 20% of homicides committed by the police were against minors in the first months of 1999.
  • In Brazil, when the body of 9-year-old Patricio Hilario da Silva was found on a main street in Ipanema in 1989, there was a handwritten note tied around his neck. "I killed you because you didn\'t study and had no future," the note read. "The government must not allow the streets of the city to be invaded by kids."
  • Port-au-Prince, Haiti, 3,000 children are estimated to live in the streets and are severely marginalized by the population. Not infrequently, they are the target of vigilante groups.

Note: CSC has a full stats sheets with all references. Please contact CSC if you would like a copy of the complete stats sheet

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