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Mining in Canada

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Mining in Canada. HR Challenges and Opportunities. Overview of Presentation. About MiHR Human Resources Challenges in the Minerals and Metals Industry Getting the Facts - Sector Study Project Key Findings Recommendations Conclusions MiHR’s role. MiHR History in two minutes.

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mining in canada

Mining in Canada

HR Challenges and Opportunities

overview of presentation
Overview of Presentation
  • About MiHR
  • Human Resources Challenges in the Minerals and Metals Industry
  • Getting the Facts - Sector Study Project
  • Key Findings
  • Recommendations
  • Conclusions
  • MiHR’s role

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

mihr history in two minutes
MiHR History in two minutes
  • First Mining Sector Study - 1993
  • MiHR (MITAC) Incorporated in 1996
  • Multi-partite structure - labor/mgt/Associations/education/equity groups
  • Products, Services & Projects (1996-03):
    • Training development – 120+ modules
    • Training Needs Assessment
    • Adjustment tools and services
    • Career information products
    • Youth Internship program

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

sector study project overview
Sector Study - Project Overview
  • 30-month study
  • Led by stakeholder Steering Committee
  • Managed by Mining Industry Human Resources Council (MiHR)
  • Funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program
  • Resulting in concrete recommendations and action plans

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

key findings industry growth
Key Findings - Industry Growth

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

key findings an aging workforce
Key Findings - An Aging Workforce

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

key findings an aging workforce7
Key Findings - An Aging Workforce

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

key findings retirement projections
Key Findings - Retirement Projections

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

key findings suppliers contractors
Key Findings - Suppliers & Contractors

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

key findings opportunities
Key Findings - Opportunities
  • Youth
  • Women
  • Aboriginal Community
  • New Canadians

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

key findings engineers
Key Findings - Engineers

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

key findings new graduates
Key Findings - New Graduates
  • Only a percentage of new graduates will seek employment in the minerals and metals industry
  • Recruitment challenge:
    • Intense global competition for Canadian graduates
    • Graduates lured by work in “exotic” locations

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

key findings geologists geochemists geophysicists
Key Findings - Geologists, Geochemists & Geophysicists
  • Supply of Geoscientists is not meeting current demand
  • Interprovincial mobility/recognition of credentials is an issue

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

key findings industry attraction
Key Findings - Industry Attraction

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

key findings supply demand gap
Key Findings - Supply & Demand Gap

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

pse supply challenge
PSE Supply Challenge
  • The mining industry will need to recruit between 57,000 and 81,000 new people in the next 10 years
  • Over 60% of this workforce (34,000 – 49,000) will require some level of post-secondary education (PSE)
  • The current mining-related PSE programs in Canada will only produce between 9,000 and 14,000 new workers for the mining industry

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

key findings recruitment practices
Key Findings - Recruitment Practices
  • Job posting is most common recruitment tool
  • Co-op and Apprenticeship programs are most effective methods of recruitment - But they are not adequately supported

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

key findings workforce planning
Key Findings - Workforce Planning
  • In general, firms plan for the current year, seldom extending planning beyond three years
  • Mining employers would benefit from:
    • Making workforce planning a priority
    • Taking a more proactive approach to identifying and developing key successors to workers who will retire

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

key findings retention strategies
Key Findings - Retention Strategies
  • Employee satisfaction is comparatively high
  • Until recently, employees have remained with same employer for several years
  • Retention is becoming a critical element of HR planning

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

key findings recruitment retention challenges
Key Findings - Recruitment & Retention Challenges
  • Competition for skilled labour
  • Awareness and perception of the industry
  • Commuter operations
  • Delayed retirement

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

key findings meeting skills requirements
Key Findings - Meeting Skills Requirements
  • Education and training
  • Skills requirements and the northern workforce
  • Impact of technological change
  • Certification requirements
  • Skills gap - post-secondary mining programs

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

call to action objectives
Call to Action - Objectives
  • Increase and make best use of all potential sources of supply
  • Address existing and expected skill gaps in the industry
  • Ensure standardization of skills and consistency of training delivery
  • Ensure that all stakeholders are aware of and understand the critical human resources issues

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

objective a increase make best use of all supply sources
Objective A - Increase/Make Best Use of All Supply Sources
  • Promote the industry to youth Ö
  • Develop national strategy focused on Canada’s Aboriginal workforce Ö
  • Actively target non-traditional groups Ö

*Current/future MiHR project(s): Ö

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

objective b address industry skills gaps
Objective B - Address IndustrySkills Gaps
  • Undertake proactive HR practices and workforce planning Ö
  • Develop programs to attract retired workers and retain older workers Ö
  • Encourage mentoring programs
  • Develop collaborative, cross-industry education and training strategy Ö

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

objective c standardized skills consistent training delivery
Objective C - Standardized Skills & Consistent Training Delivery
  • Present a clear case for the potential benefits of occupational standards, certification and program accreditation to employers and other industry stakeholders Ö
  • Develop and implement national occupational standards Ö
  • Standardize credentials for professional occupations

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

objective d awareness
Objective D - Awareness
  • Develop and implement a communications strategy Ö
    • Raise awareness and understanding of the issues
    • Promote collaboration

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

study conclusions
Study Conclusions
  • The Canadian Minerals and Metals Industry will be facing a human resources crisis within ten years
  • To mitigate risk, the industry will work collaboratively with education and governments to attract and recruit skilled workers
  • 45 individual plans/projects/initiatives suggested
  • Potential lead organizations and partners identified

Read through the recommended actions to see what you/your organization can do!

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

mihr s role
MiHR’s Role
  • Expanded governance structure
  • Marketing and Communications Plan
  • Re-instatement of membership dues
  • Strategic Priorities 2005-2008
    • Career information products
    • Aboriginal inclusion
    • Occupational standards
    • Inclusion of women
    • Retention of older workers
    • Better practices in workforce planning

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

mihr s role29
MiHR’s Role
  • A catalyst for change:
    • Canadian Institute of Mines – Mining in Society
    • Mining Association of Canada – Renewed support for MiHR
    • CAW/CEP – more engaged
    • College affinity group revived
    • University involvement - CMEC
    • Provincial/Territorial Associations
    • Other private sector players
    • Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

thank you for your attention
Thank you for your attention

Paul Hébert

Executive Director

MiHR

phebert@mihr.ca

www.prospectingthefuture.ca

www.mihr.ca

MINING INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES COUNCIL

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