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Meditech – A User Perspective & Requirements. Hospitals: Proxy for India’s healthcare boom. The Healthcare Delivery Market in India pegged at around US$ 38 billion in 2008, compared to US$ 7.7 billion Pharmaceuticals Industry and offers a huge growth opportunity

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Meditech – A User Perspective & Requirements


Hospitals proxy for india s healthcare boom
Hospitals: Proxy for India’s healthcare boom

  • The Healthcare Delivery Market in India pegged at around US$ 38 billion in 2008, compared to US$ 7.7 billion Pharmaceuticals Industry and offers a huge growth opportunity

  • India has 17% of the world's population, but one of the poorest healthcare infrastructures among growing economies and the lowest spend on healthcare (~5% of GDP)

  • Demographic changes, improving income levels, changing lifestyles, and rising insurance penetration etc will result in a rise in discretionary spending on healthcare

  • Accessible, reliable and affordable healthcare continues to be a challenge

  • Opportunity in healthcare being significantly leveraged by private healthcare providers

  • Expected to generate employment opportunities for 9 million people by 2012

15%

2


Evolution of healthcare in india
Evolution of Healthcare in India

India: Per Capita Income over the last few years (USD)

Percentage share of India in world health parameters

Per capita health expenditure – $33 compared to $ 2,548 in US

Source: FICCI and Ernst & Young (2008)

Distribution of Private Healthcare Providers

Healthcare parameters per ‘000 population

US has 3.2 beds per 1,000 population and spends ~ US$ 2 trillion on healthcare

Source: FICCI and Ernst & Young (2008).

Source: FICCI and Ernst & Young (2008)

3


India: Potential to become the Global Healthcare destination

Overview

Cost of Important Procedures (US $)

  • Medical value travel is one of the most lucrative segments of the healthcare sector and is expected to grow into a US$ 1.5 billion industry by 2010

  • Potential to contribute US$ 1.2 – 2.4 billion additional revenue for up-market tertiary care hospitals by 2012, and will account for 3 – 5% of total healthcare market

US

UK

Thailand

Singapore

India

100,000

1,60,000

250,000

300,000

48,000

38,000

41,726

30,000

292,470

200,000

50,109

18,000

14,250

10,500

62,500

75,000

8,000

10,000

15,312

13,000

150,000

140,000

25,000

12,000

4,800

4,800

30,000

69,000

5,000

5,200

Heart Surgery

Heart Valve Replacement

Bone Marrow Transplant

Liver Transplant

Knee Replacement

Hip Replacement

Key drivers for the growth

Issues

  • Inadequate healthcare Infrastructure

  • Unstructured medico legal jurisdiction

  • Indians hospitals’ standards below par against the Global benchmarks of care

  • Lack of Accredited Hospitals and follow up care

  • Quality Healthcare at fraction of the cost

  • Availability of Skilled Doctors & Hospitals

  • Good reputation of Indian Doctors

  • Upsurge of Lifestyle diseases

4


Health Insurance

Growing share of urban middle class households

Health insurance market size (USDm)

CAGR: 32%

  • Health Insurance market in India is expected to grow at a CAGR of 32% to reach a market size of Rs. 27,930 crore by FY15

  • One of the fastest growing free economy

  • Ranked 4th largest economy in the world in terms of purchasing power parity

  • Higher service mix, increasing urbanization

  • Overall penetration at 2%.

  • Growth driven by: a) increasing awareness, b) soaring healthcare costs and c) demographic profile of the people

Source: CRISIL Research

5


Applications of Medical Textiles

  • Applications range from the simple cleaning wipes to the advanced barrier fabrics used for operating rooms

  • New cost-effective ways to protect both hospital staff and their patients from bacteria; viruses & body fluid invasions in Operating room environments are being developed

  • Pre-operative & Post operative (High compression stocking, casting/splints, wound dressing)

  • Surgical & Operative (sutures, implants, grafts, patches, mesh, wound dressing)

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Concept

Product

Implant

Critical Consumable

Critical disposable

Non Critical disposable

Non-critical consumable

Hygiene

Critical path

Commodity

September 2010

Business division in medical textile categories

High Margin

Low volumes

Low Margin

High volumes

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September 2010

Business division in medical textile categories…contd.

IMPLANTS

Vascular Graft/ Endovascular Stent

Soft Tissue patch

Hernia Repair implants- Plugs/ Mesh

Sutures

Local drug delivery systems

Dura substitute

Orthopedic implants

  • Critical – Consumables

    • Vascular Support System

      • Compression Stocking & garments, Sequential compression Pump.

    • Orthopedic Support System

      • Casting, Knee braces, Splints neck pads, Bandages etc.

    • Extracorporeal Devices

      • Anti- EmbolicalStockings, Sutures

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Concept

Implant

Critical Consumable

CRITICAL DISPOSABLE

Non Critical disposable

Non-critical consumable

Hygiene

Product

Critical path

Commodity

Business division in medical textile categories…contd.

September 2010

Critical Disposable Textiles:

  • OT Gowns

  • Drapes and Wraps

  • Isolation kits

  • Swipes

  • Swabs – cotton based

  • Wound Dressing

9


Implant

Critical Consumable

Critical disposable

Non Critical disposable

Non-critical consumable

Hygiene

Concept

Product

Critical path

Commodity

Business division in medical textile categories…contd.

September 2010

Commodity

  • Cotton Gauze

  • Cotton roll

  • Adhesive tapes (Plaster, Band-aid etc)

  • Cohesive tapes

  • Cotton balls

  • Surgical swabs

  • Tissues/ wipes

  • Crepe bands

  • Compression bands – adhesive, cohesive.

  • Sanitary, Nappies

  • Add……….

  • Adult Incontinence

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Doctors Overcoat

Uniforms

Business division in medical textile categories…contd.

September 2010

  • Hospital Non Critical Consumables

  • They form a large chunk of volume of usage. The pressure to dispose them is high but to manage such cost and logistic is a challenge.

  • Fabrics which are water repellant would be preferred ones for various uniforms & bed linen

Hospital Bed Assembly

11


Challenges

September 2010

12


What it means to a product Supply?

September 2010

  • Approvals of imported products from FDA, CE marking and other agencies which assures highest quality standards

  • Indian hospitals aspiring for quality accreditation such as NABH / JCI

  • These agencies insists on Standard products – Challenge on Indigenous suppliers to match the international standards

  • Absence of compiled reliable data showing impact on infection control, usage of antibiotics etc.

  • Indian hospital Industry at loss without a local supply

13


Benefits of Quality Systems?

September 2010

Benefits for PatientsAccreditation results in high quality of care and patient safety. The patients are serviced by accredited medical staff. Patient’s satisfaction is regularly evaluated.Benefits for HospitalsAccreditation to a hospital stimulates continuous improvement. It enables Hospital in demonstrating commitment to quality care. It also provides opportunity to healthcare unit to benchmark with the bestBenefits for Hospital StaffIt improves overall professional development of Clinicians and Para Medical Staff and promotes staff safetyBenefits to paying and regulatory bodiesFinally, accreditation provides an objective system of empanelment by insurance and other third parties. Accreditation provides access to reliable and certified information on facilities, infrastructure and level of care

Benefits to the industry

Accreditation helps in building data on the quality of the products, pattern of infection levels, usage pattern of antibiotics etc for better understanding & confidence building

14


September 2010

Impact of Quality Products / Service

  • The Institute of Healthcare Improvement reported that about 800,000 surgeries are complicated by infections annually, with a $9.5 billion cost to the U.S. health care system. According to a study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases, the increased length of stay following an infection is 18 days.

  • This is an opportunity loss!!!

  • Despite our best practices & using good products we are still challenged!

  • Therefore the need for better quality and innovative products coupled with service standards are the need of the hour.

15


Requirements of Hospitals in India

  • Quality products while keeping costs in check

  • New innovations to cater to growing demand

  • Organized market with marked presence of Indian players

  • Standards and certification in line with FDA/ UL/ CE

  • Setting up of state of the art labs for better and faster testing of various devices/ fabrics

  • Better logistics for improving the inventory controls of the hospitals

  • Building confidence of the end users

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Hospitals are ready to reciprocate with….

  • Prices worthy of value

  • Carry out joint programmesto study the feasibility of the products and do a proper cost analysis

  • Study the pattern of infection control & monitor usage of antibiotics

  • A total study of the complete usage cycle would help in reducing the overall spending of the hospitals

  • TCO with the industry to reduce their costs for better results to hospitals and increased patient satisfaction.

  • Investments as partners for collaboration in terms of defining, supporting and development of indigenous products for QPD

17


Conclusion
Conclusion

  • Healthcare is the new sunrise sector. With emergence of private players and spread to Tier II & Tier III cities there is bound to be rapid growth.

  • Emergence of the insurance sector will aid growth of healthcare industry but put pressure on costs.

  • Gap between Quality and Cost needs to be addressed by standards, specifications and certification.

  • Healthcare industry is ready to collaborate with the manufacturing sector for generation of standards and conducting studies on viability and cost-effectiveness of innovative products.

  • Ready to invest as partners for development of new products.

    A team-work between both the industries is a must for mutual strategic benefits

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THANK YOU…

Fortis Healthcare Limited

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