Mute swans
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 18

Mute Swans PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 125 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Mute Swans. Invasive Species. Obligations. ORC OAC. Charges SP and DOW to manage in the best interest of the natural resources on the lands we own and manage. ID. Mute Swan Trumpeter Swan Tundra Swan

Download Presentation

Mute Swans

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Mute swans

Mute Swans


Invasive species

Invasive Species

Obligations

ORC

OAC

Charges SP and DOW to manage in the best interest of the natural resources

on the lands we own and manage


Mute swans

ID

Mute Swan Trumpeter Swan Tundra Swan

Non-Native Native Native


What is a wild mute swan

What is a Wild Mute Swan

What the DOW uses to determine if a mute swan is wild or not:

  • Most times not marked (not marked=wild)

  • Consider ownership to the property owner if owner of Mute Swan can not be determined

  • Owner liable for damages/injuries though

    “The Mute Swan has long been appreciated for its beauty and grace, and it has been introduced around the world as a captive, decorative bird. Unfortunately, the Mute Swan has a voracious appetite for plant material, and is highly territorial and aggressive. Captive swans often escape or are released and can disrupt natural ecosystems that they come to reside in. For this reason, many locations have regulations on the ownership of Mute Swans.” (www.rightpet.com) comment from their website

  • We don’t appreciate people releasing wildlife on state lands without permission

  • On PLX, no one has claimed ownership of the swans


Three driving dow documents

Three Driving DOW Documents

DOW Policy 41

Invasive Species Policy

It is the policy of the Division of Wildlife to humanely dispatch invasive non-native freeranging terrestrial vertebrates found on Division owned or managed lands. The Division

will strongly encourage other land managing agencies to also eliminate these species

from their lands. The “American Veterinary Medical Association’s 2007 Guidelines For

Euthanasia” will continue to be the standard followed by the Division of Wildlife to

humanely euthanize terrestrial vertebrates. Furthermore, the Division will inform and

educate the public about the potential adverse effects of invasive non-native freeranging

terrestrial species on Ohio’s native wildlife.

Goal of any invasive species is complete removal


Mute swans1

Mute Swans

DOW Mute Swan Action Plan

The mute swan action plan has 6 specific goals:

Educate the public on the adverse consequences of mute swans on the environment

Eliminate any mute swan conflicts which involve human safety

Reduce competition between mute swans and trumpeter swans

Minimize detrimental impacts of mute swans on native wetland birds

Prohibit the release of mute swans into the wild

Implement control measures to reduce mute swan numbers in Ohio


Mute swans2

  • Public Outreach and Education

  • Population Monitoring and Research

  • Feral Population Management and Resource Protection

  • Relief of Human Safety and Nuisance Conflicts

Mute Swans

DOW Swan Management Plan

  • The Swan Management Plan has 4 objectives:

  • Public Outreach and Education

  • Population Monitoring and Research

  • Feral Population Management and Resource Protection

  • Relief of Human Safety and Nuisance Conflicts


Ohio population trends

Ohio Population Trends

Waterfowl populations can grow rapidly, think of Canada Geese

Populations can go from low to a lot quickly


Mute swans

Mute swans counted during midwinter waterfowl survey in Ohio,1992-2013


Ohio s direction

Ohio’s Direction

  • Finish management plan

  • Stronger education initiative

  • Improve surveys

  • Continue to manage on state lands

  • Issue permits to private property owners

Ohio is not the only one fighting the fight


Ohio is not the only one fighting the fight

Ohio is not the only one fighting the fight

Location of sightings of mute Swans in 2013 by citizen submission


Ohio is not the only one fighting the fight1

Ohio is not the only one fighting the fight

Maryland

Mean annual rate of population increase was 36% from 1962-78.

From 1986 to 1999 the total population in the region increased by 1398%

Michigan

Highest population. Estimate 10,000 swans in the Great Lakes area

Ontario

Ontario population is presently about 2,000 birds and is increasing at 10-15%/year

At this growth rate, the southern Ontario population will double every 7-8 years.

Indiana

Must be pinioned and kept in an enclosure that prevents their escape into the wild

Oregon and Washington

It illegal to import, possess, or sell Mute Swans

Minnesota

Introduction into the wild is prohibited

Possession of captive birds requires a state game farm license and fencing to contain them

New York

1,843 swans just on Long Island in 2008

Illegal to possess and getting ready to allow hunting

California

Unlawful to import, transport, or possess


Ohio is not the only one fighting the fight2

Ohio is not the only one fighting the fight

Letter sent to USFWS-Division of Migratory Bird Management (2003)

“PLEASE ACCEPT THE COMMENTS FROM THE 25 ORGANIZATIONS REPRESENTING MILLIONS OF

AMERICANS IN SUPPORT OF ALTERNATIVE 2, TO REDUCE MUTE SWAN POPULATIONS IN THE

EAST BY TWO-THIRDS, AND TO EVENTUALLY ISSUE A DEPREDATION ORDER TO ELIMINATE

MUTE SWANS IN THE WILD IN THE U.S”

Those that signed letter of support

American Bird Conservancy

ArchboldBiological Station

Atlanta Audubon Society

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central-Atlantic States

Audubon Pennsylvania

ChappeeRapids Audubon Society

Cooper Ornithological Society

Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology

Delmarva Ornithological Society

Ducks Unlimited

Environmental Defense

Georgia Ornithological Society

Green-Rock Audubon Society

Illinois Audubon Society

International Assn. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

Izaack Walton League of America

Madison Audubon Society

Maryland Ornithological Society

National Audubon Society

New Jersey Audubon Society

RiveredgeBird Club

Tennessee Ornithological Society

The Waterbird Society

Wildlife Management Institute

Wisconsin Audubon Council

This was in 2003 before Ohio and many other states realized the large increases

occurring in their state


Mute swans

Mute Swans

History of PLX Management

~2003 = Begin getting increased calls on aggression issues-referred to PL State Park

2004 = US FWS removed protection

2006 = Began Egg Addling

2007 = Began removing adults

Avg Eggs/Nest=5.7

(Validates potential in quick pop. Growth)

We exercise professionalism

We take into account:

Human Feelings

Bird Humaneness

Best Tactic for the Situation

Openness to inquiries

Very labor intensive

Showing our commitment

to the importance of mgmt


Mogadore res

  • Public Outreach and Education

  • Population Monitoring and Research

  • Feral Population Management and Resource Protection

  • Relief of Human Safety and Nuisance Conflicts

Mogadore Res.

This little jump we

Believe is due to our

neighbor (Congress Lake)

allowing production


Upset callers

  • Public Outreach and Education

  • Population Monitoring and Research

  • Feral Population Management and Resource Protection

  • Relief of Human Safety and Nuisance Conflicts

Upset Callers

We expected this, but…..

  • Sporadic calls up to this year

  • Approximately 40 calls within the last 6 months

  • Even a handful of “Thank You” calls

  • Most callers understand the why’s once explained to- Proves need for Education


Mute swans

Mute Swans

Ramifications of lack of management

  • Water degradation

  • Increased conflicts with recreational users (swimming, fishing, boating/kayakers/sailboats, etc.)/loss of revenue

  • Eliminate potential for Trumpeter Swans to nest

  • Aggression towards migratory birds

  • Loss of vegetation

  • Human Safety

Swan kills man in Illinois in 2012


Questions

Questions

Contact Division of Wildlife at 330-644-2293


  • Login