Maintaining a  Healthy Weight

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What is a Healthy Weight?. According to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute there are three key measures of overweight:Body mass index (BMI).Waist circumference.Risk factors for diseases and conditions associated with obesity.. Body Mass Index (BMI). BMI is a measure of your weight rela

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Maintaining a Healthy Weight

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2. What is a Healthy Weight? According to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute there are three key measures of overweight: Body mass index (BMI). Waist circumference. Risk factors for diseases and conditions associated with obesity.

3. Body Mass Index (BMI) BMI is a measure of your weight relative to your height. It is a reliable indicator of health-related factors such as obesity and physical fitness, but: It may overestimate body fat in athletes and others with a muscular build. It may underestimate body fat in older persons and others who have lost muscle.

4. Body Mass Index BMI tables or calculators may be used to determine body mass index. A BMI calculator may be found at http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/bmi/calc-bmi.htm.

6. Waist Measurement Excess fat in the abdomen is an independent risk factor for disease. Women with a waist measurement over 35 inches are at risk. Men with a waist measurement over 40 inches are at risk.

7. Other Risk Factors High blood pressure. High LDL (low density lipoprotein) cholesterol. Low HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol. High triglycerides. High blood glucose. Family history of heart disease. Physical inactivity. Cigarette smoking.

8. Maintaining a Healthy Weight through Nutrition Lose a few pounds if overweight. Watch portion sizes. Learn to prepare your favorite recipes with lower fat and calories. Eat plenty of foods rich in fiber. Drink enough water.

9. Maintaining a Healthy Weight through Nutrition Consume foods at the table. Avoid snacking after evening meal. Switch to sugar-free beverages.

10. How to Lose One Pound ONE POUND = 3,500 CALORIES To lose one pound in a week, burn 3,500 more calories than eaten. Reduce your caloric intake by 500 calories a day, or Exercise to burn 500 more calories per day, or Eat fewer calories and exercise more.

11. How to Lose One Pound How many calories does your food contain? 1 gram of protein contains 4 calories. (3 ounces of lean beef has 143 calories) 1 gram of carbohydrate contains 4 calories. (1 slice of bread has 70 calories) 1 gram of fat contains 9 calories. (1 teaspoon of margarine has 35 calories) 1 gram of alcohol contains 7 calories. (12 ounces of beer has 150 calories, 3.5 ounces of wine has 85 calories)

12. Dietary Concerns Reduce your risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer, and other diseases through a healthy eating plan.

13. Choosing Healthy Foods Follow the USDA Dietary Guidelines. Eat a minimum of 5 servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Choose 3 to 5 whole grain servings a day.

14. Watching Portion Sizes… We are eating too much! Sixty-one percent of Americans are either overweight or obese. Table-service restaurants now serve from 12-inch plates rather than the standard 10-inch plates. Americans eat 148 more calories per day compared to 10 years ago, although the percent of fat in the average diet is down from 40 percent to 33 percent. Sixty-two percent of Americans are unaware that commonly served portion sizes have increased in the last 10 years.

15. Watching Portion Sizes… Do you know the serving sizes for these common foods? Pasta = ½ cup Green salad = 1 cup Beans = ½ cup Mashed potatoes = ½ cup In the American Institute for Cancer Research survey, only 1 percent of respondents correctly answered all eight serving-size questions. These portions are standardized according to the USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Exchange lists for meal planning may have slightly different values for portions sizes than those recommended by USDA. Please note this for clients who may have a prescribed diet.Exchange lists for meal planning may have slightly different values for portions sizes than those recommended by USDA. Please note this for clients who may have a prescribed diet.

16. Watching Portion Sizes Food Portion Spaghetti 2 cups Garlic bread 2 slices Tomato sauce 1 cup Meatballs 6 ounces Serving size # Servings ½ cup 4 1 slice 2 ½ cup 2 2 to 3 ounces 2 to 3

17. Know Your Portion Sizes Grains Group (1-ounce equivalent) 1 slice of bread (70 calories) About 1 cup of ready-to-eat cereal (plain corn flakes = 100 calories) ½ cup cooked cereal, rice, or pasta (95 calories) Vegetable and Fruit Groups 1 cup of raw leafy vegetables (10 calories) ½ cup of cooked vegetables (20 calories) ¾ cup of fruit or vegetable juice (90 calories) 1 medium apple, banana, orange, or pear (90 calories) Exchange lists for meal planning may have slightly different values for portions sizes than those recommended by USDA. Please note this for clients who may have a prescribed diet. Exchange lists for meal planning may have slightly different values for portions sizes than those recommended by USDA. Please note this for clients who may have a prescribed diet. Exchange lists for meal planning may have slightly different values for portions sizes than those recommended by USDA. Please note this for clients who may have a prescribed diet. Exchange lists for meal planning may have slightly different values for portions sizes than those recommended by USDA. Please note this for clients who may have a prescribed diet. Exchange lists for meal planning may have slightly different values for portions sizes than those recommended by USDA. Please note this for clients who may have a prescribed diet. Exchange lists for meal planning may have slightly different values for portions sizes than those recommended by USDA. Please note this for clients who may have a prescribed diet.

18. Know Your Portion Sizes Milk Group 1 cup of milk or yogurt (1 cup skim milk = 90 calories) 1½ ounces of cheese (155 calories) 2 ounces of processed cheese (155 calories) Meat and Beans Group 2 to 3 ounces of cooked meat, poultry, or fish (3 ounces lean beef = 143 calories) ½ cup of cooked dry beans (105 calories) 1/3 cup of nuts (260 calories) 1 egg (80 calories) Exchange lists for meal planning may have slightly different values for portions sizes than those recommended by USDA. Please note this for clients who may have a prescribed diet. Exchange lists for meal planning may have slightly different values for portions sizes than those recommended by USDA. Please note this for clients who may have a prescribed diet.

19. Know Your Portion Sizes One cupped hand = 1 ounce nuts or small candies

20. Know Your Portion Sizes

21. Know Your Portion Sizes Palm only = 3 ounces meat

22. Know Your Portion Sizes A fist = 1 cup of pasta or cereal. 1 cup of green salad . 1 medium sized fruit. 1 cup of cut up fruit.

23. Know Your Portion Sizes One thumb = 1 ounce of cheese or 1 tablespoon of peanut butter. Thumb tip = 1 teaspoon of oil, 1 teaspoon of margarine, or 1 teaspoon of mayonnaise.

24. Beware of Larger Sizes (comparison of portion sizes, now and ten years ago)

25. Would you like to “super-size”? “Value meals”, “combo meals”, and “super-sizing” are used for profit by the food companies. When people are served more food, they eat more food. For a small price, you get more calories and saturated fat.

26. Tips for Controlling Portions At home: Measure out single servings to know what they look like. Avoid serving food “family style” and do not have second servings. Try using a smaller plate for your meal. Place portions in a serving dish and never eat out of a bag or a carton.

27. Tips for Controlling Portions Eating out: Ask for half or smaller portions. Ask for salad dressing to be served “on the side”. Order from the menu rather than the “all-you-can-eat” buffet. Know the size of an appropriate portion and set the rest aside to take home. If you order dessert, share!

28. Adopt Healthier Eating Habits in Your Life Are you eating a lot of food that is high in fat and sugar? These foods can:

29. Lowering Fat Instead of frying, try these methods: Roasting, Baking or Broiling - Use a rack to drain off the fat. Use a low roasting temperature to increase fat drip-off. Steaming. Grilling. Microwaving in small amounts of water or fat-free broth. Cook stews, soups and meat dishes in advance; refrigerate and remove hardened fat from the top. Brown meat under the broiler instead of in a pan.

30. Tips to Lower Fat and Saturated Fat Use low-fat cooking methods. Use substitutes for high-fat seasonings. Avoid fried foods and prepared foods with a breaded coating. Avoid high-fat meats and processed foods; use chicken, fish turkey, low-fat red meat, and pork. Use spices and low-fat or fat-free products to flavor foods: Garlic powder, basil, onion powder, spice blends.

31. Reducing Sugar Drink water or sugar-free beverages. Choose healthier desserts. Yogurt and low-fat & low-sugar frozen desserts. Include more fresh fruit. Angel food or sponge cake with fruit. Learn to adapt recipes to reduce sugar and fat. A sugar free label does not always mean calorie or carbohydrate free product. Common examples are fructose, lactose, galactose, maltose , dextrose, corn syrup, honey, molasses, fruit juices. A sugar free label does not always mean calorie or carbohydrate free product. Common examples are fructose, lactose, galactose, maltose , dextrose, corn syrup, honey, molasses, fruit juices.

32. Reducing Sugar Try reducing the amount of sugar in a recipe and adding a small amount of vanilla, cinnamon or nutmeg to enhance the sweet flavor. Try using sugar substitutes in recipes. Some granular products pour and measure just like sugar. If using liquid products, 10 drops = 1 teaspoon sugar.

33. Reducing Sugar Here are some commonly available sugar substitutes: Saccharin: Loses sweetness when heated over 104 °F. (Sweet and Low) Aspartame: Contains phenylalanine. This substitute is a concern for individuals with PKU. It is good for cooking and baking. (Equal) Sucralose: Very good for cooking and baking. (Splenda) Bring in samples. Bring in samples.

34. Eating Plenty of Fiber What is fiber? Fiber is the part of plants that cannot be digested. It contains no calories. There are two kinds of fiber: Water soluble fiber dissolves to become viscous or gummy. Insoluble fiber passes through our intestines largely intact.

35. Eating Plenty of Fiber What does fiber do for me? Helps me feel full (insoluble). Prevents constipation (insoluble). Removes toxins from the colon in less time (insoluble). May help prevent some types of cancer (insoluble). Binds cholesterol in the intestines (water soluble). Helps regulate blood sugar levels (water soluble).

36. Eating Plenty of Fiber How much do I need? AGE MALE FEMALE 1 to 3 years 19 grams 19 grams 4 to 8 years 25 grams 25 grams 9 to 13 years 31 grams 26 grams 14 to 50 years 38 grams 25 grams 51 + years 31 grams 21 grams Pregnancy 28 grams

37. Eating Plenty of Fiber The average American consumes 7 to 14 grams of fiber daily. How can I get more? Eat fruits and vegetables with edible skins and seeds. Eat whole grains, with bran still intact. Eat more beans and legumes.

38. Eating Plenty of Fiber The 2005 USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend adults eat three 1-ounce equivalents per day of whole-grain foods, preferably in place of refined grains. In other words, at least half of our bread servings should be whole grain.

39. Eating Plenty of Fiber How do I know if it’s whole grain? Whole grain should be the first ingredient listed on the food label. The following are NOT whole grain: Wheat flour Enriched flour Degerminated cornmeal

40. Eating Plenty of Fiber Brown rice. Bulgur. Oatmeal. Graham flour. Popcorn. Pearl barley. Whole grain corn. Whole oats. Whole rye. Whole wheat.

41. Drinking Enough Water Why do I need water? Blood is 83 percent water. Blood moves nutrients, hormones, enzymes, oxygen and other materials to our cells and carries away waste products. Lubrication. Water is needed in the linings of organs, between organs, and within joints to reduce friction.

42. Drinking Enough Water Why do I need water? Water is present in the digestive fluids that break down food. Water also helps to transport food through the digestive system. Water helps regulate body temperature. Water is necessary for many synthetic reactions within our bodies, such as building hormones. Water removes waste from our bodies.

43. Drinking Enough Water Fiber binds water in our intestines. Caffeinated beverages like coffee, tea, and soft drinks cause excretion of water. Alcoholic beverages cause water loss through excretion. Water is lost through perspiration and respiration.

44. Drinking Enough Water Adults typically need 6 to 8 cups of water or fluid each day. Amount depends upon: Body size. Level of physical activity. Age. Overall health. Climate.

45. Regular Physical Activity Can Help You to Stay Healthy and Maintain a Reasonable Weight

46. The Benefits of Physical Activity Burns calories, which can lead to weight loss. Helps your body use blood sugar more efficiently. Improves blood flow and blood pressure. Improves cholesterol levels. Increases feelings of well-being and can give you energy. Reduces stress levels.

47. How Much Physical Activity Do I Need? Thirty minutes of moderate, physical activity most days of the week. Try to fit in activity everyday. Can be split into three 10-minute sessions. Be creative with a variety of activities. Try resistance training activities at least two times per week for muscle strength and endurance. Try activities that focus on flexibility at least two times per week to help your body be limber and move easily.

48. What is Moderate Activity? Basic guidelines: Should get your heart beating faster. Should still be able to carry on a conversation during the activity.

49. Types of Activities: What counts? Everyday activities. Aerobic activities. Resistance training. Flexibility training.

50. Everyday Activities Lead to an overall healthy and active lifestyle: Parking further away. Walking to the mailbox. Getting up to change the channel instead of using the remote. Straightening the house during commercial breaks of your favorite show. Making more trips when carrying shopping bags into your home.

51. Aerobic Activities Includes activities that get your heart pumping for at least 10 minutes. You must do an activity for at least 10 minutes for it to count toward your daily goal of 30 minutes. Some common aerobic activities: Walking. Biking. Some sports such as soccer. Vigorous chores such as washing the car by hand. Stair climbing.

52. Resistance Training Makes muscles and bones stronger. Makes daily activities, like lifting boxes or carrying bags, easier. Examples include: Lifting light weights, such as dumbbells. Lifting homemade weights, such as canned goods or old milk jugs filled with sand or water. Using elastic exercise bands or tubes. Using own body weight. Push ups. Pull ups. Crunches.

53. Flexibility Training Improves the range of motion of joints, keeps the body flexible and makes movements, such as bending and reaching, easier. Examples include: Stretching. Yoga. Martial arts. Dance such as ballet.

54. Keeping Activity Safe Get a checkup from your doctor before beginning a physical activity program. Always warm up and cool down. Try marching in place for 5 minutes and then light stretching to warm up. March in place for 5 minutes, letting your heart rate return to normal, for a cool down. Start out slowly. Stop right away if you feel dizzy, short of breath, sick to your stomach, or in pain. Seek help immediately if condition worsens.

55. Stick With It! Choose an activity you enjoy. Find a buddy to be active with you. Set goals you can reach. Choose low cost activities. Look into free or low cost exercise classes in your area. Rent exercise videos at your local library. Use your neighborhood or community parks for your activity.

56. How to Lose One Pound How many calories do you use in activity? DAILY ACTIVITY CALORIES / HOUR____ Male Female Jogging 630 560 Bicycling 600 420 House Cleaning 340 240 Cooking 200 150 These numbers are approximate. Calorie burn depends on gender and body weight. Each individual is different.These numbers are approximate. Calorie burn depends on gender and body weight. Each individual is different.

57. Getting Support Make it a family goal to adopt healthier habits. Include family and friends – it’s good for them!

58. Stress Management Take time to relax. Pace yourself and activities you are involved in. Get enough sleep each night.

59. Setting Personal Goals Follow the serving sizes. Eat 5 to 9 servings of fruits and vegetables each day. Lose weight if overweight. Pack lunches instead of eating out. Cut back on fat intake. Be physically active. Get annual physical. Practice stress management techniques.

60. Setting Personal Goals Set three personal goals to improve your health. Examples: 1. To lose 10 pounds by cutting out 500 calories a day. 2. To begin an exercise program by walking 5 days a week for 10 to 15 minutes, gradually increasing to 30 minutes per day. 3. To drink diet instead of regular soft drinks.

61. Prevention If there was a vaccine to prevent diabetes, heart disease or cancer, would you take it?

62. It is Up to You! The next best thing to a vaccine is: Regular physical activity. Eating well. Maintaining a healthy weight.

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