The effects of symbolic play on language development in children who are deaf or hard of hearing
Download
1 / 12

The Effects of Symbolic Play on Language Development in Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 223 Views
  • Uploaded on

The Effects of Symbolic Play on Language Development in Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. Objectives: Provide an introduction of the important role that play has on the development of language.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'The Effects of Symbolic Play on Language Development in Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing' - rene


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
The effects of symbolic play on language development in children who are deaf or hard of hearing l.jpg

The Effects of Symbolic Play on Language Development in Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

  • Objectives:

  • Provide an introduction of the important role that play has on the development of language.

  • Provide examples of how the development of play and language differ between children with a hearing impairment and their normal hearing peers.

  • Describe the impact that caregivers have on their child’s development.

Age of Intended Audience: 18 and up

Abstract: This product was designed to inform professionals and families about the effects of symbolic play . Through understanding, caregivers and professionals alike can provide an appropriate model for both language and play by knowing the natural order of development.


Between hearing children and those with a hearing loss l.jpg

The relationship between symbolic play and language development is similar:

13 mos. = play is related to receptive language, not so much expressive.

20 mos. = the amount of expressive language is equal to play.

2 ½ yrs. = language skills lead the development of play.

Between hearing children and those with a hearing loss…


Still lagging l.jpg
Still lagging! development is similar:

  • Deaf (D) children still lag in their comprehension and expression of language.

  • They lack full access to communicative information.

  • Degree of loss affects awareness of spoken communication forms.


What is the big deal about play l.jpg
What is the big deal about play? development is similar:

  • The communication that occurs in play requires children to know what to communicate, how to communicate, and to understand other’s communication.


Symbolic vs non symbolic l.jpg
Symbolic vs. Non-Symbolic? development is similar:

  • Non-symbolic play was found to have no bearing on later communication abilities.

  • Symbolic play is related to various aspects of early language development in children that are D/HOH.


Hearing impaired children and their play behaviors l.jpg

Less likely to identify a specific role. development is similar:

More likely to use real objects.

Show little evidence of planning.

More repetitive in their play behavior.

Hearing Impaired Childrenand Their Play Behaviors


Environmental factors l.jpg
Environmental Factors development is similar:

  • Dyad Hearing Status

    • Deaf children of deaf mothers have similar language abilities as hearing children of hearing mothers.

    • Hearing mothers of deaf children lack the responsiveness conducive of child language.


Ideas to keep in mind l.jpg
Ideas to Keep in Mind development is similar:

  • Provide structured play scenarios during early development.

  • Guide and encourage parents to use pretend play as a context for interaction with their child.

  • Encourage parents to refer to events that occurred in the past.


Parents the first teachers l.jpg
Parents: The First Teachers development is similar:

  • Teach parents the hierarchy of symbolic play.


References l.jpg
References development is similar:

  • Bornstein, M.H., Selmi, A.M., Haynes, D.M., Painter, K.M., & Marx, E.S. (1999). Representational abilities and the hearing status of child-mother dyads. Child Development, 70(4), 833-852.

  • Brown, P.M., Prescott, S.J., Rickards, F.W., & Paterson, M.M. (1999). Communicating about pretend play: A comparison of the utterances of 4-year-old normally hearing and deaf or hard of hearing children in an integrated kindergarten. Volta Review, 99(1), 5-17.

  • Brown, P.M., Rickards, F.W., & Bortoli, A. (2001). Structures underpinning pretend play and word production in young hearing children and children with hearing loss. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 6(1), 15-31.

  • Lyytinen, P., Laakso, M., Poikkeus, A., & Rita, N. (1999). The development and predictive relations of play and language across the second year. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 40, 177- 186.


References11 l.jpg
References development is similar:

  • Microsoft Power Point. (1998). Microsoft Office 2000: Premium Professional. Microsoft Corporation, United States.

  • Microsoft Clip Art (1998). Microsoft Office 2000: Premium Professional. Microsoft Corporation, United States.

  • Morelock, M.J., Brown, P.M., & Morrissey, A. (2003). Pretend play and maternal scaffolding: Comparisons of toddlers with advanced development, typical development, and hearing impairment. Roeper Review, 26(1), 41-51.

  • Schick, B., de Villiers, J., de Villiers, P., & Hoffmeister, B. (2002, December 3). Theory of mind: Language and cognition in deaf children. The ASHA Leader, 7(22), 16-18.

  • Snyder, L.S. & Yoshinaga-Itano, C. (1998). Specific play behaviors and the development on communication in children with hearing loss. Volta Review, 100(3), 165-185.

  • Spencer, P.E. (1996). The association between language and symbolic play at two years: Evidence from deaf toddlers. Child Development, 67, 867-876.


References12 l.jpg
References development is similar:

  • Umek, L.M. & Musek, P.L. (2001). Symbolic play: Opportunities for cognitive and language development in preschool settings. Early Years, 21(1), 55-64.

  • Yoshinaga-Itano, C., Snyder, L.S., & Day, D. (1998). The relationship of language and symbolic play in children with hearing loss. Volta Review, 100(3), 135-164.


ad