Metadata standards
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Metadata Standards. Catherine Lai MUMT-611 MIR January 27, 2005. Presentation Outline. Definition of Metadata Functions of Metadata Types of Metadata Examples of Metadata Standards Conclusion and Outstanding Questions Questions and Comments. Defining Metadata.

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Metadata Standards

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Metadata standards

Metadata Standards

Catherine Lai

MUMT-611 MIR

January 27, 2005


Presentation outline

Presentation Outline

  • Definition of Metadata

  • Functions of Metadata

  • Types of Metadata

  • Examples of Metadata Standards

  • Conclusion and Outstanding Questions

  • Questions and Comments


Defining metadata

Defining Metadata

  • Structured data about data

  • To identify, arrange, describe, and enhance access to an information object

    (screen shot of a partial Muse bibliographic record)

  • Data describing digital resources


Functions of metadata

Functions of Metadata

  • To describe the record content

    • what object contains or is about

  • To document the record context

    • who, what, why, where, how of creation

  • To preserve record’s structure

    • formal set of associations

  • To provide intellectual access points for users

  • To provide information in a physical reference


Types of metadata

Types of Metadata


Examples of metadata standards

Examples of Metadata Standards

  • MAchine-Readable Cataloging (MARC)

  • Dublin Core (DC)

  • Text Encoding Initiative (TEI)

  • Encoded Archival Description (EAD)

  • Visual Resource Association Core Categories (VRA Core)

  • Metadata Object Description Schema (MODS)

  • Many others


Metadata standards

MARC

  • Originated in 1966

  • MAchine Readable Catalog

  • First comprehensive computerized metadata scheme

  • MARC --> USMARC & CAN/MARC (1980s)

    --> MARC 21 (1997)

  • Metadata standard for library catalogs

  • Maintained by the Network Development and MARC Standards Office at LC and the Standards and the Support Office at the National Library of Canada


Example of a marc record

Example of a MARC Record

Fixed fields -->

(Leader)

--------------

computer generated

index

(Directory)

--------------

Variable fields -->

  • Tag (3-digit number)

  • Indicator (1-digit number)

  • Subfield (preceded by the delimiter e.g. ‡n)

(http://www.music.indiana.edu/tech_s/manuals/training/marc/record1.html)


Marc tag group

MARC Tag Group

  • Numerically by function:

(http://www.oclc.org/bibformats/en/default.shtm)


Example of a marc record1

Example of a MARC Record

(http://www.oclc.org/bibformats/en/default.shtm)


Dublin core

Dublin Core

  • Developed in 1995 for web resources

  • Set of 15 simple elements:

    TitleDescriptionSource

    CreatorTypeRelation

    SubjectFormatLanguage

    PublisherIdentifierCoverage

    ContributorDateRights

  • Support resource discovery (IR) on the web

  • General and Easy

  • Main usage currently embedded into HTML meta tags


Example of dublin core

Example of Dublin Core

<HTML>

<HEAD>

<TITLE>A Poem</TITLE>

<META NAME="DC.Title" CONTENT=”A Poem">

<META NAME="DC.Creator" CONTENT=”Lai, Catherine">

<META NAME="DC.Type" CONTENT="text">

<META NAME="DC.Date" CONTENT=”2005">

<META NAME="DC.Format" CONTENT="text/html">

<META NAME="DC.Identifier” CONTENT="http://www.music.mcgill.ca/~lai/poem.html">

</HEAD>

<BODY><PRE>

A poem line 1

A poem line 2.

A poem line 3

A poem line 4.</PRE></BODY>

</HTML>


Metadata standards

TEI

  • Launched in 1987

  • Guidelines for encoding machine-readable texts to the humanities and social sciences

  • “maximally expressive and minimally obsolescent” (www.tei-c.org)

  • Document structural hierarchy, divisions, and characteristic tags


Example of tei markup

Example of TEI Markup

<p><q>She'll happen do better for him nor ony o' t' grand

ladies.</q> And again, <q>If she ben't one o' th’ handsomest, she's noan fa&agrave;l, and varry good-natured; and i' his een she's fair beautiful, onybody may see that.</q></p>

<p>I wrote to Moor House and to Cambridge immediately, to say what I had done: fully explaining also why I had thus acted. Diana and </p>

(http://www.tei-c.org/Lite/U5-eg.html)


Example of tei markup1

Example of TEI Markup

<p>I wrote to Moor House and to Cambridge immediately, to say what I had done: fully explaining also why I had thus acted. Diana and <pb n='475'/> Mary approved the step unreservedly. Diana announced that she would just give me time to get over the honeymoon, and then she would come and see me.</p>

(http://www.tei-c.org/Lite/U5-eg.html)


Conclusion and outstanding questions

Conclusion and Outstanding Questions

  • Little consensus on level of complexity of semantic structure

    • Need flexibility and scalability

  • Different disciplines for different formats

    • Need interoperability and accessibility


Questions comments

Questions & Comments


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