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EE 489 Telecommunication Systems Engineering University of Alberta Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering Lecture 1 Wayne Grover TR Labs and University of Alberta. What is telecommunications?. “tele” – Greek for distant “communicatio” – Italian for connection Telecommunication

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Ee 489 telecommunication systems engineering university of alberta

EE 489

Telecommunication Systems Engineering

University of Alberta

Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Lecture 1

Wayne Grover

TRLabs and University of Alberta


What is telecommunications

What is telecommunications?

  • “tele” – Greek for distant

  • “communicatio” – Italian for connection

  • Telecommunication

    • distant connection or

    • transfer of meaningful information from one location to another

  • Today it means:

    • “high tech” methods of information transfer

      • Voice

      • Video

      • Data


Telecomunication systems change our lives the always on world is upon us

Telecomunication Systems change our lives: … the “always-on” world is upon us….


Introduction

Introduction

  • Reasons you might take EE 489

    • R&D career options

      • Vendors (e.g. Nortel, Cisco)

      • Telcos (e.g. Telus, AT&T)

      • ISPs and other Internet Business

      • Private Networks

    • Pre-requisites for other courses

      • EE 686 (Digital Transmission Systems)

      • EE 683 (Fibre Optic Communications)

      • EE 681 (Survivable Networks)

  • Personal interests

    • Major critical public infrastructure

    • Societal importance and history

  • Or..“Its just neat to know how things in your everyday life actually work ! 


Introduction 2

Introduction (2)

  • EE 489 is mainly an introduction to key concepts

    • Concepts and theory for operation and design

    • Architectural concepts

    • Basic principles of various topics in telecom engineering

      • Traffic engineering

      • Telephony principles, digital coding of speech

      • Wireless, cellular

      • Transmission system design, fiber optics

      • Switching systems

      • Internet

      • Optical Networking


Us circuit switched voice and internet traffic

US Circuit Switched Voice and Internet Traffic

Source: Renaissance Analysisvia Marconi PLC 2001

Compound Annual Growth Rate1996-2005

14,000

12,000

Internet 95.8%

10,000

8,000

Terabytes / day

Voice over IP 30%

6,000

Data Traffic 30%

4,000

2,000

Circuit Switched 12.1%

0

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005


Fiber optics and wdm 1980s

1310nm

1550nm

0.6

0.5

0.4

Attenuation (dB/km)

0.3

0.2

0.1

1500

1600

1700

1400

1300

1200

Fiber Optics and WDM: 1980s

Wavelength (nm)


1990s dense wdm itu channel spacing

1990s Dense WDM: ITU Channel Spacing

ITU Channel Spacing

0.6

1540

1530

1535

1545

1550

1555

1560

1565

1525

0.5

0.4

And each wavelength can carry ~ OC-192 (10 Gb/s)

Attenuation (dB/km)

0.3

0.2

0.1

1500

1600

1700

1400

1300

1200

Wavelength (nm)


Trying to appreciate the capacity of fiber optics

Trying to appreciate the capacity of fiber optics

Adapted from Marconi OctoBrief 2001

If 64Kb/s = 1 lane

Then with current technology, a single

fiber would = 25 Million Lanes,

or a Highway that was 60,000 Miles Wide


Ee 489 telecommunication systems engineering university of alberta

Some real fiber optic networks


Ee 489 telecommunication systems engineering university of alberta

British Telecom


The level 3 n american network

The Level(3) N. American Network


Some other fiber network topologies

some other fiber network topologies

32-node Italian backbone transportnetwork


Growth of global telecom system

Growth of global telecom system

  • “It took a hundred years to connect a billion people by wire. It has taken only ten years to connect the next billion people.”

    • National Geographic Magazine, December 2001


Your instructor wayne grover

Your Instructor: Wayne Grover

  • B.Sc. - Carleton U, Ottawa, M.Sc. - U. Essex, U.K. (Commonwealth Scholar), Ph.D. - U. Alberta (‘89) - “Self-healing Networks”

  • 10 years BNR (Nortel Networks) Research & Development

  • Start-up of TRLabs consortium, 1987 (Founding VP - Research)

    • Research and management roles at TRLabs, 1986- present

  • 2002 IEEE Fellow “for contributions to survivable and self-organizing broadband networks”

  • 30 years telecom R&D experience

  • >35 patented inventions to date

  • web site: http://www.ece.ualberta.ca/~grover/


Timeline of modern telecom

Timeline of Modern Telecom

  • 1837– Samuel Morse invents telegraph (demonstrated in 1844)

    • “What hath God wrought?”

  • 1850 – Telegraph cables cross English Channel

  • 1858 – First trans-Atlantic telegraph cable laid (Canada to Ireland)

  • 1876 – Alexander Graham Bell invents telephone (Brantford, ON)

    • “Watson come here, I want you”

  • 1885 – AT&T incorporated

  • 1888 – Heinrich Hertz discovers electromagnetic waves

  • 1895 – Marconi invents wireless telegraph

  • 1895 – Northern Electric and Manufacturing Company Ltd.

  • 1901 – Marconi sends first trans-Atlantic wireless telegraph (England to Newfoundland); dot-dash “spark gap” transmitter


  • Timeline of modern telecom 2

    Timeline of Modern Telecom (2)

    • 1906 – Canadian Reginald Aubrey Fessenden realized the first public radio voice broadcast http://www.icce.rug.nl/~soundscapes/VOLUME02/Reginald_Aubrey_Fessenden.shtml

    • 1912 – First SOS transmitted from RMS Titanic

    • 1919 – XWA (Montreal) becomes first licensed radio station in North America

    • 1923 – First radio hockey play-by-play by CKCK (Regina)

    • 1924 – First radio airing of Stanley Cup game

    • 1927 – First radio trans-Atlantic commercial phone calls

    • 1932 – Trans-Canada telephone toll system

    • 1939 – Electronic computer developed

    • 1941 – Marriage of computer and communications

      • telegraph code punched on paper tape read by computer


    Timeline of modern telecom 3

    Timeline of Modern Telecom (3)

    • 1947/1948 – Transistor invented at Bell Labs

    • 1950 – Time division multiplexing developed

    • 1956 – First trans-Atlantic phone cable

    • 1960 – Laser developed

    • 1961 – Integrated circuit developed

    • 1962 – Telstar I launched (first communication satellite)

    • 1966 – Northern Telecom publishes first paper related to optical fibres

    • 1969 – Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) funds “ARPANET”

    • 1970 – Corning Glass develops first optical fibre


    Timeline of modern telecom 4

    Timeline of Modern Telecom (4)

    • 1975 – First digital telephone switch (Northern Telecom)

    • 1977 – Above switch installed in Canada

    • 1981 – Above switch installed in USA

    • 1982 – “Internet” used to describe successor to ARPANET

    • 1989 – First SONET-standard optical fibre products released (Northern Telecom)

    • 1990 – World Wide Web becomes part of the Internet

    • Today:

      • 1 billion telephones in over 200 countries

      • ~15 Billion microprocessors on the planet (6 Billion humans).

      • Telegraphy, telephony, data, television, finance, etc integrated into global telecom system


    Some of what the future holds

    Some of what the Future Holds

    • I. Expansion to the developing world (estimated ~ 3 billion people have never used a telephone)

      • Opportunities to build “green fields” network designs

      • Short-cut to the latest technology

      • Huge role for fixed wireless and satellite

    • II. Machine-to-Machine communication

      • More machines than humans

      • Can exchange data more quickly

      • Think: “this overhead projector will have its own IP address and talk on its own to the world about its bulb burning out”

      • “pervasive computing”

      • Seamless human-machine interfaces; wearable computers, virtual reality

    • III. “Convergence” of…

      • Telephone, TV, Movies, Telemetry, Monitoring, Internet, Storage

    • IV. Future applications: Virtual reality, 3D holography, telepresence, web agents, robots, weather prediction,…

      • Some future applications are estimated to require backbone capacities of 1,000 to 200,000 terabits/sec (1 terabit/sec = 1012 bit/sec)

         Telecommunications is still very much a growth industry !


    Importance of switching avoiding a show stopper

    Consider Southern Canada and USA:

    2500 km

    5000 km

    Importance of Switching – Avoiding a “show stopper”

    • If there were no switching machines, each phone would have to be directly connected to all others. What are the implications?

    Size = 5000 km x 2500 km

    Size = 12 500 000 km2


    Switching machines 2

    Fully connected:

    Average wire pair cross-section

    Therefore volume of wiring

    Depth of wiring

    Switching Machines (2)

    Approximately 250 million phones

    Assume average connection is 2000 km long.

    60km

    deep!


    How to do well in this course

    How to do well in this course

    • Come to every class

    • Get the Decorby notes download and do the assigned readings.

    • Check web site at least once a week in advance for any further notes or problem solutions or handouts.

    • Print and organize all course materials in sequence in a binder

    • Take notes when whiteboard developments are done

    • Do all assigned problems

    • Go over in-class examples

    • Approach to exam writing

      • Do easy questions first

      • Don’t rush

      • Show all work

    • Term tests and/or Final will contain or be based upon:

      • At least one assigned problem

      • At least one in-class example


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