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Migrant Graduation Specialist, Student Advocate, and Federal Program Director Strand Supplemental Services and Developing Collaborative Relationships in Schools. Session 3 Day 2: August 16 th 8:30 – 10:00 a.m. Title I, Part C, Migrant Education Program. Session Summary Agenda.

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session 3 day 2 august 16 th 8 30 10 00 a m

Migrant Graduation Specialist, Student Advocate, and Federal Program Director StrandSupplemental Services and Developing Collaborative Relationships in Schools

Session 3

Day 2: August 16th

8:30 – 10:00 a.m.

Title I, Part C, Migrant Education Program

session summary agenda
Session Summary Agenda
  • Welcome/Orientation
  • Large Group Activity – Dream Team
  • OSPI MEP Service Delivery Plan Highlights
  • MGS/MSA and Dropout Prevention Through Research Based Models
    • Dropout Prevention Research
    • Academic Press, Social Support, and Relational Trust Research Based Model
  • Washington State Comprehensive Counseling and Guidance Framework Supports Collaboration with the MGS and MSA
  • How a Graduation Specialist and Advocate Support the Response to Intervention (RTI) Approach with use of the SNA (PFS students)
  • Collaborating and Ensuring Supplemental Services are Provided
  • Local Activities and Documentation Requirements
  • Tips and Examples of Collaborations:
    • Academic Guidance and Counseling Strategies
    • Classroom Learning Walks
  • Sunnyside School District – All Hands On Deck Model
  • MGS/MSA and FPD Planning Session
thank you for coming this strand meets professional development requirements for mgs and msa staff

Thank you for coming!This strand meets professional development requirements for MGS and MSA staff.

Appreciation to OSPI, Migrant Education

Helen Malagon

Sylvia Reyna

Lupe Ledesma

Sunnyside School District

Dr. Richard Cole

SEMY Staff, Heather Garcia Mendoza

slide5

MAKING THE CONNECTION: Migrant Graduation Specialists (MGS) and Student Advocates (MSA) and Dropout Prevention through Research Based Models

Administrators

School Partners

Teachers

Community Partners

Migrant Student

Family

School Counselors and MGSs/MSAs

section highlights
SECTION HIGHLIGHTS
  • OSPI MEP Service Delivery Plan Highlights
  • Migrant Graduation Specialists (MGS) and Student Advocates (MSA) and Dropout Prevention through Research Based Models
    • Dropout Prevention Research
    • Academic Press, Social Support, and Relational Trust Research Based Model
  • MGS/MSA Alignment: Supports All MSA Activities, All MGS Activities
ospi migrant education program priorities and service delivery plan
OSPI Migrant Education Program Priorities and Service Delivery Plan
  • Academics – close the achievement gap in reading, math, writing, and science.
  • Continuance – school readiness, increase graduation rate, and decrease drop-out rate.
  • English language proficiency – coordination of services with State Transitional Bilingual Instructional Program and Title III English Language Acquisition Program.
  • Non-academic services (to the extent feasible): advocacy and outreach to migrant children and families; professional development for program; family literacy programs; integration of information technology into educational and related programs; and programs to facilitate the transition of secondary school students to post-secondary education or employment.

State MEP Conference (August) - https://www.msdr.org/resources/MigrantBringingTheFuture.pdf

dropout prevention research supports assigning adult advocates to students

SEE HANDOUT

Pg. 6

DROPOUT PREVENTION RESEARCH:Supports Assigning Adult Advocates to Students

The examples illustrate practices that were noted by previously implemented dropout prevention programs as having had an impact on staying in school, progressing in school, or completing school.

DIAGNOSTIC

  • Utilize data systems that support a realistic diagnosis of the number of students who drop out and that help identify individual students at high risk of dropping out.

TARGETED INTERVENTION

  • *Assign adult advocates to students at risk of dropping out.
  • Provide academic support and enrichment to improve academic performance.
  • Implement programs to improve students’ classroom behavior and social skills.

SCHOOLWIDE INTERVENTION

  • Personalize the learning environment and instructional process.
  • Provide rigorous and relevant instruction to better engage students in learning and provide the skills needed to graduate and to serve them after they leave school.

Dynarski, Clarke, Cobb, Finn, Rumberger, and Smink (2008).

slide9

Academic Press and Social Support Research Based ModelResearch Focuses on Cognitive and Affective Domain With Academic Achievement OutcomesThis research has been acknowledged by Washington State Migrant Education as a viable and pertinent information upon which to base a student advocacy model for migrant students.

  • MGS/MSA Alignment: Supports All MSA Activities, All MGS Activities
slide10

Research Based Model

Relational Trust

Feeling Safe

Having something to offer

Provide time and expertise

LEARNING

Academic Press

Provides specific direction embedded in high standards/ goals and belief of success for everyone

Social Support

Provides assistance/

help in meeting expected standards/goals

big three
Big Three

Adding relational trust supports all parties within the reform effort and makes a more stable and sustainable model

what is academic press

Visit www.semy.org

What Is Academic Press?

BE THINKING - WHAT IS THE MGS and MSA ROLE IN

FACILITATING ACADEMIC PRESS?

School Academic Support Structures

Student Academic Preparedness

Necessary Collective Teacher/Staff Beliefs

  • Postsecondary Readiness
      • Curriculum Rigor
      • Postsecondary Prepared and Aware
  • Classroom Press
      • Classroom curricular rigor, pedagogy and assessment
      • Teacher push towards academic performance
  • Necessary Student Characteristics
      • Persistence/Work Ethic/Beliefs
      • Goals Beyond High School
benefit to students academic press
Benefit to Students - Academic Press

Academic Press affects student achievement in at least four ways:

Enhances student self-concept – students see themselves as a learner.

Promotes relational trust

  • Provides specific direction for student work and academic attainment. It points students and teachers to what they need to accomplish.
  • Creates incentives that motivate students and teachers to achieve at higher levels.
what is social support

Visit www.semy.org

What is Social Support?

BE THINKING - WHAT IS THE MGS and MSA ROLE IN

FACILITATING SOCIAL SUPPORT?

Student Orientation

Positive Orientation Towards School

Sense of Belonging/Extracurricular Engagement

Academic Self-Efficacy (Effort/Optimism)

School Support

Student Voice

Discipline/Fairness

  • Teacher/Advocate Support
    • Teacher Characteristics and Beliefs
    • Student Perceptions of Staff Support
  • Support from Outside the School
    • Community Support
    • Parental Support
  • Peer Support
    • Peer Relations
    • Safety
benefit to students social support
Benefit to Students - Social Support
  • Creates motivation for students to succeed.
  • Builds confidence of self.
  • Promotes relational trust.
  • Provides psychological safety.
    • Allows students to take risks, admit mistakes, ask for help, experience failure and bounce back (resiliency)

MGS and PASS Contact, Sylvia Sanchez, Stanton Alternative High, with award winning student

slide16

Together

Academic Press Social SupportBUILDS RELATIONSHIPS AND CONNECTS

Migrant Students

slide17

TOGETHER WE CAN: Fostering a Collaborative Environment for All to Succeed!

MIGRANT STUDENT

COUNSELORS, TEACHERS, ADMINISTRATORS…

MIGRANT GRADUATION SPECIALIST AND STUDENT ADVOCATE

Collaborate

“Alone we can do so little, together we can do so much”

Helen Keller

section highlights1
SECTION HIGHLIGHTS
  • Washington State Comprehensive Counseling and Guidance Framework Supports Collaboration with the MGS and MSA
  • How a Graduation Specialist and Advocate Support the Response to Intervention (RTI) Approach with use of the SNA (PFS students)
  • Collaborating and Ensuring Supplemental Services are Provided
  • Local Activities and Documentation Requirements
  • Examples of Collaborations:
    • Academic Guidance and Counseling Strategies
    • Classroom Learning Walks
slide19

MGS/MSA ALIGNMENT

  • MGS:1:Implement a case management model focused on providing supplemental support and intervention strategies to address the unique needs of migrant students.
  • MSA:2 : Provide supplemental support and services focused on meeting the unique needs of migrant students.
  • MSA:3 andMGS:3:Coordinate services with other resources migrant students may be eligible and entitled to receive.
  • MSAks:3 andMGSks:3:Knowledge of secondary school programs and state and local graduation requirements.
  • MSAmr:1 andMGSmr:1:Coordinate with school counselor, teachers, and other appropriate staff to develop a roster of migrant students most at-risk of not meeting state academic and achievement standards.
  • MSAmr:3 andMGSmr:3:Work with school counselor and selected students to develop student plans/goals that lead to a successful transition to the next grade level and postsecondary education or employment.
slide20

MGS/MSA ALIGNMENT

  • MSAmr:4 andMGSmr:5:Coordinate access to services available through school district and/or community to reduce and/or eliminate identified barriers.
  • MSAmr:5 andMGSmr:6:Coordinate access to services available through school district and/or community that strengthen communication, self-advocacy, and leadership skills.
  • MSAmr:6 andMGSmr:7:Facilitate access to school counselor and teaching staff regarding academic needs, including class scheduling to ensure access to required courses for graduation and transition to postsecondary education or employment.
  • MGSmr:9: Work with school counselor to monitor attendance, discipline, credits/grades, and other social/academic issues that may impact the student’s ability to successfully transition to next grade level, graduate, or pursue postsecondary opportunities or employment.
  • MGSmr:10: Maintain on-going communication with counselor, students, families, and other school staff regarding the progress of the student to achieve established goals and transition to next grade level, graduate, or pursue postsecondary opportunities or employment.
migrant student advocacy aligns with counselor framework
Migrant Student Advocacy Alignswith Counselor Framework

SEE HANDOUT

  • Mentor like relationship providing intervention on behalf of migrant students.
  • The coordination or facilitation of access to academic press (educational)and social support (personal-social)activities to successfully:
    • transition migrant students to the next grade level,
    • support students to complete high school, and
    • promote student transition to postsecondary education/employment (career development).
slide22

WASHINGTON’S COMPREHENSIVE GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING FRAMEWORK: Connection to the MGSs/MSAs

EMPOWERS Counselor to be a Change Agent Through Advocacy and Collaboration…

Dropout Prevention Research, Academic Press, Social Support, Relational Trust Model

Research based

SNA, MGS/MSA Logs

Data Driven

All Students

MGS/MSA ensure the unique needs of migrant students are being met

AND

Ethical Decision Making

School wide Interventions

YES, YES, and YES!!

MGS/MSA ensure the unique needs of migrant students are being met

MGS/MSA Approach and collaborations with other school and community programs

response to intervention approach how the mgs msa supports rti approach

VISIT www.semy.org

RESPONSE TO INTERVENTION APPROACH: How the MGS/MSA Supports RTI Approach

MGS/MSA staff must ensure Priority For Service (PFS) students’ needs are met first, before serving other migrant-eligible students.

response to intervention approach how the mgs msa supports rti approach1
RESPONSE TO INTERVENTION APPROACH: How the MGS/MSA Supports RTI Approach

PRIORITY FOR SERVICE SUMMARY:

  • Criterion #1: Interrupted school year

AND

  • Criterion #2: Low academic state assessment scores (see handout)

When state assessment data is unavailable, proxy risk factors may be applied.

response to intervention approach how the mgs msa supports rti approach2
RESPONSE TO INTERVENTION APPROACH: How the MGS/MSA Supports RTI Approach

PFS PROXY RISK FACTORS:

  • Language Proficiency – student’s score on Washington’s English Language Proficiency test is within the limited English proficient levels (1, 2, and 3)
  • Retained – enrolled in same grade from one school year to next
  • Grade Age / Over age - age does not match acceptable range for grade level placement with in 2 years
  • Credit Deficiency (for secondary age students only) – student has not earned sufficient credits per his/her school’s graduation requirements and grade level
what you do when paid by migrant education is important
WHAT YOU DO -- WHEN PAID BY MIGRANT EDUCATION -- IS IMPORTANT!

ESSENTIAL Do’s and Don’ts:

MGS, Mario Reyes, Eastmont at work with colleagues and students

Supplementing Basic Education and Other Education Programs to Support Migrant Student Academic Achievement

  • DO Always communicate with your supervisor and federal grants administrator to understand size and scope of your job
  • DO Build relationships with students, school staff, community and family contacts
  • DO be sure to ‘stay legal’*
  • In general, DON’T do for migrant students what other programs are already or could be doing*
  • DON’T do activities already conducted by basic education for all students*

*this is very broad generalization for discussion purposes only. Reference official supplant vs. supplement guidance, and call OSPI Migrant Education, (360) 725-6147 if you have questions.

supplement vs supplant

SEE HANDOUT

Supplement vs. Supplant

OMB Circular A-133

"In the following instances, it is presumed that supplanting has occurred:

  • The SEA or LEA used Federal funds to provide services that the SEA or LEA wasrequired to make available under other Federal, State or local laws.
  • The SEA or LEA used Federal funds to provide services that the SEA or LEA provided with non-Federal funds in the prior year.
  • The SEA or LEA used Title I, Part A or MEP funds to provide services for participating children that the SEA or LEA provided with non-Federal funds for nonparticipating children.

These presumptions are rebuttable if the SEA or LEA can demonstrate that it would not have provided the services in question with non-Federal funds had the Federal funds not been available.”

Excerpted from OSPI MEP Webinar (September)

- http://www.k12.wa.us/MigrantBilingual/Webinar/2012Sept/MBWebinarMigrant.wmv

SEA=State Educational Agency

LEA=Local Education Agency

supplement vs supplant definition of services
Supplement vs. Supplant Definition of Services

“Servicesare distinct in that they are the educational or educationally related activities provided to migrant children to enable them to succeed in school.

The criteria for determining whether the activity is a service include:

  • directly benefits migrant students;
  • is grounded in scientifically based research; and
  • will increase the students’ academic skills and thereby increase their ability to meet the State’s performance targets.

Remember PFS: In providing services, SEAs must give priority to migrant children who are failing or are most at risk of failing and whose education has been interrupted during the regular school year…”

Excerpted from OSPI MEP Allowable Activities handout presented on 09/28/12

supplement vs supplant mgs msa examples of supplement vs supplant
Supplement vs. SupplantMGS/MSA Examples of Supplement vs. Supplant

Always ask: “What would happen in the absence of MEP funds?”

local student events activities required documentation
Local Student Events/Activities Required Documentation

Does your school conduct student events or activities? Such as:

Guest speakers

College visits

Student conferences

College or career fairs

If yes, advocate, intervene, ensure, facilitate and coordinate migrant student access to these activities. This is a major role for an advocate, and particularly if the above support academic achievement.

local student events activities required documentation1
Local Student Events/Activities Required Documentation

If utilizing Migrant Education Program funds for local student events/activities, the Program should demonstrate the following:

    • Documentation that the identified needs of migrant students have been addressed in accordance with state priorities and activities/events are feasible and do not reduce services to address priority needs.
    • A description of how the event/activity will be evaluated for its impact on academic achievement of participating students.
    • Documented plan describing how the student’s experience in event/activity will have an on-going component that builds on school academics and post-secondary goals.
  • Excerpted from OSPI MEP Webinar (September)
  • - http://www.k12.wa.us/MigrantBilingual/Webinar/2012Sept/MBWebinarMigrant.wmv
local student event activities documentation considerations
Local Student Event/ActivitiesDocumentation Considerations

Tip:

Check with your administrator and determine locally developed documentation requirements BEFORE an event or activity.

what does it look like to collaborate
What does it look like to collaborate?

BE THINKING - WHAT IS THE MGS and MSA ROLE IN

PROVIDING SUPPLEMENTAL SUPPORT…

WHO SHOULD I INVOLVE?

learning walks
Learning Walks

Observing students in classroom helps to:

  • Foster positive relations
  • Develop shared expectations
  • Promote questioning
  • Stimulate interest
  • Assist students to consider and identify processes that will support achievement of the learning goals

Tino Barerra, Pasco counselor and Student Leadership Program (SLP) alumni, Samantha Ruiz, MGS, Wahluke, and Josue Quezada, WSU CAMP

tip for conducting learning walks
Tip for Conducting Learning Walks

Meaningful Student Questions In the Classroom Which Promote Academic Achievementand Assess Student Engagement:

  • What are you learning today?
  • What do you understand about the learning?
  • How does topic or goal connect to you?
  • What will you do now with your new learning?
  • Did the learning challenge you?
  • Are you engaged in this class today?
slide43

A Proven Model: Sunnyside High School’s – All Hands On Deck (AHOD)

Philosophy: District Vision


All students will be successful.

District Mission-

In order to ensure success for all students, focus is:

  • Effective Leadership
  • Quality Teaching and Learning
  • Continuous Improvement
  • Clear and Collaborative Relationships
demographic information

A Proven Model: Sunnyside High School’s – All Hands On Deck (AHOD)

Demographic Information

*Accessed from the Washington State Report Card: http://reportcard.ospi.k12.wa.us/Summary.aspx?groupLevel=District&schoolId=299&reportLevel=District&orgLinkId=3205&yrs=2011-12&year=2011-12

slide45

A Proven Model: Sunnyside High School’s – All Hands On Deck (AHOD)

Research Based Model

Relational Trust

  • Feeling Safe
  • Having something to offer
  • Provide time and expertise

LEARNING

Academic Press

Provides specific direction embedded in high standards/ goals and belief of success for everyone

Social Support

Provides assistance/

help in meeting expected standards/goals

slide46

A Proven Model: Sunnyside High School’s – All Hands On Deck (AHOD)

AHOD - Highlights

  • AHOD:System of support for members of the counseling department.
  • Purpose:To create a system to effectively monitor, case manage, and create a graduation plan for students NOT on track to graduate in collaboration with teachers, students, and parents
  • Target Audience:Students most at risk of NOT graduating
  • Focus areas: Academics, Behavior and Attendance
  • Why it works: It is successful due to the collaboration within the counseling department and the relational trust developed with the teachers, students, and parents they serve in the community
impact ahod has on a school

A Proven Model: Sunnyside High School’s – All Hands On Deck (AHOD)

Impact AHOD has on a school
  • Builds collaboration between counseling department and school
  • Provides framework for school counseling program
  • Defines the school counseling program
  • Increases the power of data collection
    • Data used to maximize benefit to individual student growth
  • Increases collaboration for utilizing school and community resources.
  • Increases collaboration for parent partnership in their child’s education.
a p roven model sunnyside high school s all hands on deck ahod
A Proven Model: Sunnyside High School’s – All Hands On Deck (AHOD)

Summary

  • Research based model implemented at Sunnyside Senior High where 18% are migrant
  • Proven results:
    • Increased graduation rate in one year from 70.9% to 78.4%
    • High staff: student efficacy
      • All hands on deck with

philosophical basis embraced by all (visionary leader)

      • Professional development
      • Staff and student roles are specific and all are held accountable

MSA, Alejandra Bobadilla, at Sunnyside High

  • “Coming together is a beginning, staying together is progress, and working together is success” Henry Ford
slide51

PEER TO PEER SHARING:

Developing Collaborations

slide53

MENTOR LEAD SMALL GROUP DISCUSSIONS

  • Discussion/Reflection Topics:
  • What is the current reality at your school?
  • What collaborations will or would you like to form at your school to support migrant students.
  • What are some of the challenges faced in collaborating with others?
  • What seemed to be the reason for the challenge?
  • What solution was used to remedy problem?
  • What could you do as an MGS or MSA to strengthen collaborations?
  • Who could support you in performing your functions and how?
  • Can your FPD help facilitate access to this support/collaboration?
slide54

MGS/MSA AND FPD PLANNING SESSION

SEE HANDOUTS

TIPS TO CONSIDER:

Consider MGS/MSA activities that may support your local service delivery plan in alignment with the Washington State MEP Service Deliver Plan.

Ensure activities are supplemental and not supplanting.

Identify possible partners and supports.

Identify who will be lead on action items (e.g. MGS, MSA, or FPD.)

state program contacts
State Program Contacts

Title I, Part C, Migrant Education Program

Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

PO BOX 47200

600 Washington Street SE

Olympia WA 98504-7200

360.725.6147

www.k12.wa.us/migrantbilingual

Helen Malagon, Director

[email protected]

Lupe Ledesma, Program Supervisor

[email protected]

Sylvia Reyna, Program Supervisor

[email protected]

Paul McCold, Administrative Program Specialist 2

[email protected]

statewide program support
Statewide Program Support

Migrant Student Data and Recruitment Office and Secondary Education for Migrant Youth

509.837.2712

msdr.org

810-B E. Custer Avenue

Sunnyside, WA 98999

Migrant Health Program

509.682-3248

ncesd.org/migranthealth

PO Box 2424

Chelan, WA 98816

migrant education field offices
Migrant Education Field Offices

It is highly recommended that you participate in the professional development opportunities offered through your local Migrant Education Field Office e.g., “7 Areas of Concern” and “Migrant 101”

Educational Service District 105

Migrant Education Program

509.454.2854

esd105.org (educational services)

33 S. Second Avenue

Yakima, WA 98902

Educational Service District 123

Migrant Education Program

509.544.5751

esd123.org (educational services)

3918 W. Court St.

Pasco, WA 99301

Educational Service District 171

Migrant Education Program

509.665.2616

ncesd.org (services)

430 Olds Station Road

PO BOX 1847

Wenatchee WA 98801

Educational Service District 189

Migrant Education Program

360.299.4048

esd189.org (support programs)

1601 R. Avenue

Anacortes, WA 98221

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