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The Whitechapel Murderer 1888. During the autumn of 1888, a sadistic devil prowled the dimly lit streets of London’s East End. Seeking out prostitutes of Whitechapel’s lowest classes to feed his insatiable blood lust.

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The Whitechapel

Murderer 1888


During the autumn of 1888, a sadistic devil prowled the dimly lit streets of London’s East End.

Seeking out prostitutes of Whitechapel’s lowest classes to feed his insatiable blood lust.

He brutally murdered and systematically disembowelled his unfortunate victims.

Now, over 100 years following his blood soaked reign of terror…

I invite you to peer into the world of this most infamous killer and see whether you can solve this unsolvable puzzle.


Whitechapel in 1888 dimly lit streets of London’s East End.

Murderers

rapists

pickpockets

The

criminal

class.

Home to:

The mass

Unemployed.

Casual and

Seasonal

prostitutes


A Harsh Life dimly lit streets of London’s East End.

Prostitution was one of the only reliable means through which a single woman or widow could maintain herself. The police estimated that in 1888 there were some 1,200 prostitutes in Whitechapel, not including the women who supplemented their small earnings by occasional prostitution.


Elizabeth Stride dimly lit streets of London’s East End.

29th September 1888

Kate Eddowes

29th September 1888

Annie Chapman

8th September 1888

Mary-Jane Kelly

9th November 1888

Polly Nicholls

31st August 1888

The Victims

It is almost certain

that the only connection

between the Whitechapel

murderer and his victims

came at the point

of their deaths.


Ripper Modus Operandi dimly lit streets of London’s East End.

The murderer and his victim always faced each other.

The Ripper seized the women by their throats and strangled them.

The Ripper lowered his victims to the ground.

He then cut the throats with a knife from the right side to the left side of her throat.

The Ripper then made his other mutilations.


Who? dimly lit streets of London’s East End.

The police had a basic idea about the person they were looking for…

  • A white male.

  • Average or below average height.

  • between 20 – 40 years old.

  • Did not dress as a labourer or homeless person.

  • Had accommodation in the East End of London.

  • Possibly had medical connections.

  • May have been a foreigner.

  • Right handed.

  • Had a regular job as murders took place at the weekend.

  • Was single so that he could commit the murders.


  • The ‘Ripper’ was extremely clever. He dimly lit streets of London’s East End.

  • chose prostitutes who were used to

  • dealing with strange men in dark alleys.

  • He was also confident – look at the way

  • he committed the murders…

  • Outside.

  • Often in near total darkness.

  • Keeping one eye out for the approach of others.

  • Under extremely tight time constraints.

  • The ‘Ripper’ was extremely confident and

  • arrogant. His method of killing was too

  • random, clever and quick for the police.

The Ripper was even cocky enough

to send ‘clues’ to people he

thought were important.

he sent clues to the police, press and

even local men in Whitechapel.


25 Sept: 1888 dimly lit streets of London’s East End. Dear Boss

I keep on hearing the police have caught me but they wont fix me just yet. I have laughed when they look so clever and talk about being on the right track. That joke about Leather Apron gave me real fits. I am down on whores and I shant quit ripping them till I do get buckled. Grand work the last job was. I gave the lady no time to squeal. How can they catch me now. I love my work and want to start again. You will soon hear of me with my funny little games. I saved some proper red stuff in a ginger beer bottle over the last job to write with but it went thick like glue and I cant use it. Red ink is fit enough I hope ha. ha. The next job I do I shall clip. The lady's ears off and send to the Police officers just for jolly wouldn't you. Keep this letter back till I do a bit more work then give it out straight. My knife's so nice and sharp I want to get to work right away if I get a chance. Good luck.Yours truly Jack the Ripper

Contact from a Killer

Hundreds of letters from the murderer were sent to the police, news agencies and people linked with solving the crime. Only three of these letters were believed. Two, in particular, which are written by the same individual, actually created the name "Jack the Ripper." The two letters, written in red ink, gave the murderer his name. It was received by Central News on September 27, 1888 and was addressed to The Boss.


Prince Albert Victor dimly lit streets of London’s East End.

Montague Druitt

George Chapman

Aaron Kosminsky

Michael Ostrog


Conclusion dimly lit streets of London’s East End.

We do not and may never know who Jack the Ripper really was!

We may never know!

But what is certain:

“People love learning about Jack the Ripper!”


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