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Creating Classroom Environments to be Active and Maintain Order, Rigor, and Effective Outcomes. SAM 136 Instructors’ Seminar Professional and Academic Center for Excellence Marsha J. Harman, Ph.D. Critical Thinking Warm-Up.

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Creating classroom environments to be active and maintain order rigor and effective outcomes

Creating Classroom Environments to be Active and Maintain Order, Rigor, and Effective Outcomes

SAM 136 Instructors’ Seminar

Professional and Academic Center for Excellence

Marsha J. Harman, Ph.D.


Critical thinking warm up
Critical Thinking Warm-Up Order, Rigor, and Effective Outcomes

  • In your teams, read the situation on the next slide. Create some questions to ask that can be answered with “yes” or “no.”

  • As each group rotates and asks questions to narrow the correct answer to the puzzler, cross out your duplicate questions and think of more.


When time stands still
When Time Stands Still Order, Rigor, and Effective Outcomes

  • As a burglar reaches for something on the mantle, he accidentally knocks over a clock. It falls to the floor, breaks, and stops. The next morning, however, police aren’t able to determine what time the robbery took place. Why not?


Sam 136 coat of arms
SAM 136 COAT OF ARMS Order, Rigor, and Effective Outcomes

  • Divide you coat of arms into six parts.

  • Using only symbols:

    • What is something that makes you happy about teaching SAM 136

    • Your greatest success to date in teaching SAM 136

    • Your greatest failure to date in teaching SAM 136


  • What three words do you want your students to use in describing you in SAM 136? (you may use words on this one).


  • You gain and maintain classroom control through
    You Gain and Maintain Classroom Control Through budge regarding teaching in SAM 136

    • your reputationfor effort, flexibility, and availability;

    • your reputation for firmness and fairness;

    • your knowledge of the content;

    • keeping the students focused and wanting to learn;

    • responding forcefully and fairly to challenges to your authority


    Effort flexibility availability
    Effort, Flexibility, & Availability budge regarding teaching in SAM 136

    • Try to learn their names, and say them.

    • Be in the classroom 15 minutes before class starts.

    • Start on time.

    • Encourage them, but avoid one-on-one or small-group rehashes. These create fairness issues, the bane of higher-level education.



    • You can tell how you're doing by watching the class. need for a back-up plan when they break.

      • Smiles and eager responses means you're doing well.

      • If there's a room full of frowns, or people looking at watches and the clock, say, "How are we doing? Too fast? Too slow? Seen this before?Got a better idea of what we could be doing?"

      • Listen to what they tell you. They are usually right.


    Firmness and fairness
    Firmness and Fairness need for a back-up plan when they break.

    • Explain why you've asked the class to do various things.

    • If there is something about the classroom that's unacceptable, don't tolerate it.

    • Keep as relaxed a classroom atmosphere as possible.


    • Fairness includes recognizing need for a back-up plan when they break.

      • good behavior and effort.

        • Say their names.

        • Praise them for good behavior.

        • Avoid sarcasm or shouting (indicates loss of control)


    Knowledge of content
    Knowledge of Content need for a back-up plan when they break.

    • Students will judge this (rightly) by your ability to answer their questions.

      • How you handle questions

      • Welcome all questions as they arise.

      • Requests for clarification

      • Off-topic questions

    • Start a lecture with an attention-grabber.

    • Finish with something about how they will use this material in the future


    Keep students focused on wanting to learn
    Keep Students Focused on Wanting to Learn need for a back-up plan when they break.

    • MUST be able to explain the content CLEARLY

    • With adult learners, use why, because, and you

    • Involve the class

    • Ask questions ranging from knowledge to evaluation on Bloom’s Taxonomy


    Bloom 1956 3 types of learning
    Bloom (1956): need for a back-up plan when they break. 3 Types of Learning

    • Cognitive: mental skills (Knowledge)

    • Affective: growth in feelings or emotional areas (Attitude)

    • Psychomotor: manual or physical skills (Skills)


    Levels of student thinking bloom s taxonomy
    Levels of Student Thinking need for a back-up plan when they break. Bloom’s Taxonomy

    • Evaluation

    • Synthesis

    • Analysis

    • Application

    • Comprehension

    • Knowledge


    Knowledge verbs

    Define need for a back-up plan when they break.

    Fill in the blank

    Identify

    Label

    List

    Locate

    Match

    Memorize

    Name

    Recall

    Spell

    State

    Tell

    Underline

    Knowledge Verbs


    Knowledge activities
    Knowledge Activities need for a back-up plan when they break.

    • Quiz Games

      • Jeopardy

      • Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me

      • Who Am I?

      • What’s Wrong with This Picture?


    Research shows that early learning centers in which infants are trained with letter and number flashcards

    • A. produce children who learn to read and write earlier than their agemates.

    • B. may threaten infants’ interest in learning and produce responses much like those of stimulus-deprived infants.

    • C. often produce children who are classified as gifted during the elementary school years.


    Who am i
    Who Am I? are trained with letter and number flashcards

    • I was born in 1944 in Eatonton, Georgia, to sharecropper parents. (25)






    Who am i1

    Who Am I? black-white relations in the novel

    Alice Walker


    Comprehension verbs

    Convert black-white relations in the novel

    Describe

    Explain

    Interpret

    Paraphrase

    Put in order

    Restate

    Retell in your own words

    Rewrite

    Summarize

    Trace

    Translate

    Comprehension Verbs


    Comprehension activities
    Comprehension Activities black-white relations in the novel

    • Graphic Organizers

    • Put in Correct Order


    Application verbs

    Apply black-white relations in the novel

    Compute

    Conclude

    Construct

    Demonstrate

    Determine

    Draw

    Find out

    Give an example

    Illustrate

    Make

    Operate

    Show solve

    State a rule or principle

    Use

    Application Verbs


    Application activities
    Application Activities black-white relations in the novel

    • Mind Maps

    • Create a

      • Cheer

      • Acronym

      • Mnemonic


    Mnemonic
    Mnemonic black-white relations in the novel

    • Create a mnemonic that will help you remember the levels of student thinking in Bloom’s Taxonomy.


    Analysis verbs

    Analyze black-white relations in the novel

    Categorize

    Classify

    Compare

    Contrast

    Debate

    Deduct

    Determine the factors

    Diagnose

    Diagram

    Differentiate

    Dissect

    Distinguish

    Examine

    Infer

    Specify

    Analysis Verbs


    Analysis activities
    Analysis Activities black-white relations in the novel

    • Debate

    • What’s Wrong with this Picture?

    • Fishbowl

    • Categorize Movie Characters into Theory’s Stages


    What s wrong
    What’s wrong? black-white relations in the novel

    Sidney is fourteen years old and very ill with Tay-Sachs disease. His African American family has prayed consistently in church for him, but he remains very ill. However, he continues to be very active on his school’s junior varsity team. He is even the quarterback when he is able and is hailed as the winningest quarterback in the school’s history.


    Fishbowl
    Fishbowl black-white relations in the novel

    Should Representative Barton have apologized to BP CEO Tony Hayward for being required to set up a $20B escrow fund for oil spill damages?


    • Rep. Joe Barton told Hayward he was "ashamed" of the pressure the White House put on BP to create the $20 billion escrow fund to cover losses to victims of the spill. "I think it's a tragedy of the first proportion that a private corporation can be subjected to what I would call a shakedown," the Texan said. "In this case a $20 billion shakedown."


    Synthesis verbs

    Change pressure the White House put on BP to create the $20 billion escrow fund to cover losses to victims of the spill. "I think it's a tragedy of the first proportion that a private corporation can be subjected to what I would call a shakedown," the Texan said. "In this case a $20 billion shakedown."

    Combine

    Compose

    Construct

    Create

    Design

    Find an unusual way

    Formulate

    Generate

    Invent

    Originate

    Synthesis Verbs



    More synthesis verbs

    Plan to the front of the room

    Predict

    Pretend

    Produce

    Rearrange

    Reconstruct

    Reorganize

    Revise

    Suggest

    Suppose

    Visualize

    Write

    More Synthesis Verbs


    Synthesis activities
    Synthesis Activities to the front of the room

    • Design a Menu

    • Pretend You Are the Committee…


    Committee work
    Committee Work to the front of the room

    • Pretend you are advisors to President Gaertner

    • Formulate a plan of action regarding how to encourage freshmen to develop study skills.


    Evaluation verbs

    Appraise to the front of the room

    Choose

    Compare

    Conclude

    Decide

    Defend

    Evaluate

    Give your opinion

    Judge

    Justify

    Prioritize

    Rank

    Rate

    Select

    Support

    Value

    Evaluation Verbs


    Evaluation activities
    Evaluation Activities to the front of the room

    • Rank from Least to Most Important


    Rank order from least important to most important
    Rank order from least important to most important. to the front of the room

    • Knowledge

    • Comprehension

    • Application

    • Analysis

    • Synthesis

    • Evaluation


    Bloom s taxonomy
    Bloom’s Taxonomy to the front of the room


    Respond forcefully and fairly to challenges to your authority
    Respond Forcefully and Fairly to Challenges to Your Authority

    • Anticipate the question

    • Anticipate the complaint

    • Have a Plan B


    Hecklers
    Hecklers Authority

    • Hecklers tend to be misinformed; portray you as:

      • Radical Right crackpot

      • Radical Left crackpot

      • Close-minded dogmatist

      • Malicious oppressor of the human race

    • Your battle with heckler is for support of the audience


    Critical thinking break
    Critical Thinking Break Authority

    • In your teams, read the situation on the next slide. Create some questions to ask that can be answered with “yes” or “no.”

    • As each group rotates and asks questions to narrow the correct answer to the puzzler, cross out your duplicate questions and think of more.


    Not so safe
    Not So Safe Authority

    • A man keeps his expensive belongings in safes. No one has ever seen him enter a combination, and he has never written one down or told it to anyone. When he opens one of his safes, he is shocked to find everything stolen. The safe wasn’t damaged and had been locked, so how did the thief open the safe?


    Brief brainstorm
    Brief Brainstorm Authority

    • Think about someone you view as an influence in your life.

    • Write three adjectives that would describe this person.


    What would your students say about you any chance it would be like this
    What would your students say about you? AuthorityAny chance it would be like this?

    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_1_MydgRFZw&NR=1


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