1.  Find and label the verb and subject in each sentence.
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Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms. PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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1. Find and label the verb and subject in each sentence. 2. Underline the independent clause in each sentence. Put any subordinate clauses in parentheses.

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Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms.

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Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms

1. Find and label the verb and subject in each sentence.

2. Underline the independent clause in each sentence. Put any subordinate clauses in parentheses.

3. Use the chart from your notes to help you identify each sentence as simple (SS), compound (CD), complex (CX), or compound-complex (CC).

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Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms.


Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms

1. Find and label the verb and subject in each sentence.

2. Underline the independent clause in each sentence. Put any subordinate clauses in parentheses.

3. Use the chart from your notes to help you identify each sentence as simple (SS), compound (CD), complex (CX), or compound-complex (CC).

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Networks didn’t want to offend their viewers, and they had a long list of topics to avoid.

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Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms

1. Find and label the verb and subject in each sentence.

2. Underline the independent clause in each sentence. Put any subordinate clauses in parentheses.

3. Use the chart from your notes to help you identify each sentence as simple (SS), compound (CD), complex (CX), or compound-complex (CC).

All in the Family broke most of the TV taboos in its eight years.


Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms

1. Find and label the verb and subject in each sentence.

2. Underline the independent clause in each sentence. Put any subordinate clauses in parentheses.

3. Use the chart from your notes to help you identify each sentence as simple (SS), compound (CD), complex (CX), or compound-complex (CC).

The show was the first sitcom to deal with topics that previous shows had ignored.


Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms

1. Find and label the verb and subject in each sentence.

2. Underline the independent clause in each sentence. Put any subordinate clauses in parentheses.

3. Use the chart from your notes to help you identify each sentence as simple (SS), compound (CD), complex (CX), or compound-complex (CC).

For the first time, audiences heard a toilet flush on a sitcom!


Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms

1. Find and label the verb and subject in each sentence.

2. Underline the independent clause in each sentence. Put any subordinate clauses in parentheses.

3. Use the chart from your notes to help you identify each sentence as simple (SS), compound (CD), complex (CX), or compound-complex (CC).

Archie and Edith Bunker became household names, and the show made stars out of actors Carroll O’Connor and Jean Stapleton.


Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms

1. Find and label the verb and subject in each sentence.

2. Underline the independent clause in each sentence. Put any subordinate clauses in parentheses.

3. Use the chart from your notes to help you identify each sentence as simple (SS), compound (CD), complex (CX), or compound-complex (CC).

Shows based on minor characters were also hits, which made All in the Family even more famous.


Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms

1. Find and label the verb and subject in each sentence.

2. Underline the independent clause in each sentence. Put any subordinate clauses in parentheses.

3. Use the chart from your notes to help you identify each sentence as simple (SS), compound (CD), complex (CX), or compound-complex (CC).

The show opened doors for other sitcoms; in fact, when The Simpsons aired, critics called it a cartoon All in the Family.


Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms

1. Find and label the verb and subject in each sentence.

2. Underline the independent clause in each sentence. Put any subordinate clauses in parentheses.

3. Use the chart from your notes to help you identify each sentence as simple (SS), compound (CD), complex (CX), or compound-complex (CC).

Homer, the father on The Simpsons, acts like Archie, but Homer is better at avoiding work.


Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms

1. Find and label the verb and subject in each sentence.

2. Underline the independent clause in each sentence. Put any subordinate clauses in parentheses.

3. Use the chart from your notes to help you identify each sentence as simple (SS), compound (CD), complex (CX), or compound-complex (CC).

When The Simpsons tackles a subject, it spares no one.


Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms

1. Combine sentences 1 and 2 to form a complex sentence by turning sentence 2 into a subordinate clause.

(1) The Brady Bunch Movie shows how out of place the Brady family is in the 1990s. (2) They are stuck in the 1970s.

The Brady Bunch Movie shows how out of place the Brady family is in the 1990s becausethey are stuck in the 1970s.


Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms

2. Combine sentences 3 and 4 to form a compound sentence.

(3) The family has sack races on the lawn. (4) They still wear polyester clothes.

The family has sack races on the lawn, andthey still wear polyester clothes.


Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms

3. Combine sentences 5 and 6 to form a complex sentence by turning sentence 5 into a subordinate clause.

(5) Middle sister Jan plots to make older sister Marcia look ugly. (6) Marcia always remains beautiful.

Although middle sister Jan plots to make older sister Marcia look ugly, Marcia always remains beautiful.


Television once had strict codes for family sitcoms

4. Combine sentences 7, 8, 9 to form a compound-complex sentence, turning sentence 7 into a subordinate clause.

(7) The Bradys’ neighbor hates them. (8) He tries to force them to move. (9) The Bradys raise enough money to save their home.

The Bradys’ neighbor, who hates them,tries to force them to move, but the Bradys raise enough money to save their home.


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