nursing workforce planning
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Nursing Workforce Planning

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 31

Nursing Workforce Planning - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 134 Views
  • Uploaded on

Nursing Workforce Planning. Mariel S. Lavieri Sandra Regan Martin L. Puterman Pamela A. Ratner. Outline. Introduction. Model Description. Final Remarks. Background Our Approach Model Overview. Model Inputs Formulation Outputs. Background.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Nursing Workforce Planning' - randi


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
nursing workforce planning

Nursing Workforce Planning

Mariel S. Lavieri

Sandra Regan

Martin L. Puterman Pamela A. Ratner

outline
Outline

Introduction

Model

Description

Final Remarks

  • Background
  • Our Approach
  • Model Overview
  • Model
  • Inputs
  • Formulation
  • Outputs
background
Background
  • Workforce planning, training and regulation is thedominant immediate and long term issue for policy makers, managers, and clinical organizations.

Listening for Direction: A national consultation on health services and policy issues

  • Registered nurses account for just over one-third of the health workforce.
  • Today’s decision have long term implications.
  • Decisions in the 1990’s:
    • decrease education seats,
    • increase casualization of the workforce
    • decrease nurse leadership
  • In 2001, the CNA president noted “Canada should be graduating about 10,000 nurses annually to replenish the workforce in the next 10 years”.
background4
Background

Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information. (2006).

Workforce Trends of Registered Nurses in Canada, 2005.

background5
Background

Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information. (2006).

Workforce Trends of Registered Nurses in Canada, 2005.

background6
Background

Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information. (2006).

Workforce Trends of Registered Nurses in Canada, 2005.

background7
Background

Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information. (2006).

Workforce Trends of Registered Nurses in Canada, 2005.

background8
Background

w

Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information. (2006).

Workforce Trends of Registered Nurses in Canada, 2005.

background9
Background

Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information. (2006).

Workforce Trends of Registered Nurses in Canada, 2005.

estimating requirements of providers
Estimating Requirements of Providers
  • Utilization-based
    • Current utilization patterns
  • Needs-based
    • Population-health needs
  • Effective demand-based
    • Economic constraints
planners need
Planners Need
  • Precise short and long term plans that provide:
    • Nursing education seats
    • The number of nurses to recruit and at what level
    • The number of nurses and managers to promote
  • Models:
    • Inputs and assumptions can be varied and implications seen
  • Flexible unified frameworks that apply to any workforce:
    • Regional
    • Provincial
    • National
    • Sub-specialty
our approach
Our Approach

A flexible computer-basedoptimization model that provides a minimum cost human resource plan subject to workforce targets and high quality service delivery standards.

model overview

Data:

  • Nurse

workforce

size

  • Student

body

  • Population

projection

  • Outputs:
  • Optimum costs
  • Yearly student

population

  • Yearly

workforce size

  • Run model:
  • Minimum

cost plan

Model Overview
  • Assumptions:
  • Attrition rates
  • Nurse/Pop.
  • Costs
model overview16

Data:

  • Nurse

workforce

size

  • Student

body

  • Population

projection

  • Outputs:
  • Optimum costs
  • Yearly student

population

  • Yearly

workforce size

  • Run model:
  • Minimum

cost plan

Model Overview
  • Assumptions:
  • Attrition rates
  • Nurse/Pop.
  • Costs
model overview17

Data:

  • Nurse

workforce

size

  • Student

body

  • Population

projection

  • Outputs:
  • Optimum costs
  • Yearly student

population

  • Yearly

workforce size

  • Run model:
  • Minimum

cost plan

Model Overview
  • Assumptions:
  • Attrition rates
  • Nurse/Pop.
  • Costs
scope
Scope
  • Registered Nurses in British Columbia
  • 20 year planning horizon
  • Decisions made once each year
  • Ages 17 – 65+
  • 7 levels
  • Full time equivalent basis
workforce flowchart

Cost of education

Do other work/retire

New students/recruits

Workforce Flowchart

Student(year 1)

Student(year 2)

Student(year 3)

Student(year 4)

Direct Care Nurse

Entry Level Management

Senior Level Management

model
Model
  • Decision Variables:

In each year

    • How many to admit
    • How many to recruit
    • How many to promote

Students(year 1) Students(year 3)

Direct care nurses Entry level management

Direct care nurses Entry level management

model21
Model
  • This model tracks the number of:

of age i that are in the system in year j

Students(year 1) Students(year 2) Students(year 3) Students(year 4) Direct care nurses Entry level management Senior level management

model22
Model

Minimize:

Cost of training + Recruitment cost + Salary

In order to:

  • Have sufficient resources (FTEs) to achieve quality of care targets.
  • Achieve balance of “recruit” and BC nurses.
  • Only promote nurses after they have been in their position a specified number of years.
variable inputs
Variable Inputs
  • Costs:
    • Education:
      • Student (annual) (1)
      • Management training (one shot) (1)
    • Recruitment and turnover cost(2)
    • Salaries (by level) (3)
  • Continuation and attrition rates:
    • Attrition rates (4), (5)
    • Age distribution (6), (7), (8)
    • Probability of continuing the degree (6), (9)
    • Probability of passing the RN exam (7)
    • Probability of leaving BC after graduation (7)
    • FTE per full time person per age per experience time in position (7)
  • Initial Conditions:
    • Distribution of current workforce by position (8)
    • Ratio of RN to population (8)
    • BC population projections (11)

(1)Ministry of Advanced Education

(2)Weber (2005)

(3)BCNU

(4) Kazanjian (1986)

(5) O’Brien-Pallas et al. (2003)

(6) UBC School of Nursing (2006)

(7) CRNBC (2005)

(8) CIHI (2005)

(9) Pringle and Green (2005)

(10) CIHI (2005)

(11) BC STATS (2006)

slide24

Cost of training

Recruitment cost

Annual salary

Necessary resources

Balance students

Recruit vs

Canadian nurses

Promotion rules

scenarios
Scenarios
  • Proportion of students that continue the program after each year of study
  • Nurse to manager ratios and nurse attrition rates
  • Changes in maternity leaves
  • Changes in the minimum number of nurses needed to satisfy the demand
final remarks
Final Remarks
  • Challenges with data and future considerations for data collection
  • Attrition rates from nursing education programs as well as from the profession have a big impact on our decision making process
  • Benefits of bringing together nursing researchers and operational researchers
ad