Ubd stage 1 identify desired results
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UbD Stage 1: Identify Desired Results. Essential Questions, Enduring Understandings, Key Knowledge and Skills. Brain Booster. Before we dig in to curriculum, take 3 minutes and draw a pig. Don’t peek at anyone else’s pig!. Objectives.

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UbD Stage 1: Identify Desired Results

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Ubd stage 1 identify desired results

UbD Stage 1: Identify Desired Results

Essential Questions, Enduring Understandings, Key Knowledge and Skills


Brain booster

Brain Booster

  • Before we dig in to curriculum, take 3 minutes and draw a pig. Don’t peek at anyone else’s pig!


Objectives

Objectives

  • Identify and describe components of Stage 1 in Understanding by Design

    • Essential Questions

    • Enduring Understandings

    • Key Knowledge and Skills

  • Identify and critique (or create) Stage 1 components for first unit plan


Norms and expectations

Norms and Expectations

  • Embrace (or at least anticipate) the pain.

    • Growth + Pain = Change

  • Engage in the content and break during the breaks.

  • Computers are only needed during the “Application” portions of the session. Cell phones are only needed during breaks.

  • Challenge by choice.


Essential questions

Essential Questions

“It is through the process of actively interrogating the content that students strengthen and deepen their understanding.”

Big Ideas

Essential Questions

Standards


Essential questions inquiry

Essential Questions - Inquiry

Look at the handouts in your binder. Examine the “Essential Questions” vs. the “Not Essential Questions” and the Additional examples for your content.

  • What traits to the essential questions have in common?

  • How do they differ from the others?


Essential questions defining characteristics

Essential Questions – Defining Characteristics

  • Open-ended: no single, final, and correct answer

  • Thought-provoking and intellectually engaging: sparks discussion and debate

  • Require higher-order thinking: analysis, inference, evaluation, prediction

  • Include important, transferable ideas within or across disciplines

  • Raise additional questions: spark inquiry

  • Require support and justification

  • Recur over time: should be revisited frequently


Essential questions identify activity

Essential Questions – Identify Activity

  • In what year was the Battle of Hastings fought?

  • How do effective writers hook and hold their readers?

  • Is biology destiny?

  • Onomatopoeia – what’s up with that?

  • What are examples of animals adapting to their environment?

  • What are the limits of arithmetic?


Essential questions 3 types

Essential Questions – 3 Types

  • Overarching: frame entire courses and programs of study; provide conceptual framework for curriculum that spirals around the same EQs unit to unit and grade to grade.

  • Topical: help students come to particular understandings around specific topics and skills; specific to the topic of a unit.

  • Metacognitive and Reflective: essential to effective learning and performance


Elevator speech

Elevator Speech

  • You run into Grant and Jay, the creators of UbD on the elevator one day. They ask what you know about essential questions. You have 45 seconds to convey how knowledgeable you are. Go!

    • Develop your elevator speech that conveys:

      • What essential questions are

      • The different types of EQs

      • One example from your content

  • You have 3 minutes before you “go live”!


Essential questions intent trumps form

Essential Questions – Intent Trumps Form

Why you ask a question matters more than how you phrase it.

“What’s the pattern?”

  • A 2nd grade teacher asks, "Boys and girls, look at the numbers 2, 4, 6, 8, ___. What comes next? What's the pattern?"

  • A science teacher shows a data table of incidents of AIDS cases over a 15-year period, disaggregated by age, gender, region, and socioeconomic status. His question to students is "What's the pattern (or patterns)?"


Essential questions application

Essential Questions - Application

  • Log in to Atlas and select your course and first unit.

  • Examine the essential questions for that unit:

    • Do they fit the characteristics we’ve identified?

    • Are they overarching, topical, or metacognitive?

    • Is the number of questions sufficient for the unit of study (do more need to be added or do some need to be deleted)?

  • Make any necessary adjustments.


Understanding the bridge from essential questions to understanding

Understanding-The Bridge from Essential Questions to Understanding

  • How do essential questions and understandings relate?

    • Our essential questions point toward important transferable ideas that are worth understanding, even as they provide a means for exploring those ideas.

Understanding

Essential Questions


Understanding the bridge from essential questions to understanding1

Understanding-The Bridge from Essential Questions to Understanding


Understanding the big ideas

Understanding-The Big Ideas

Understandings synthesize what students should understand,

—not just know or do—

as a result of studying a particular content area.


Understandings the 6 facets

Understandings-The 6 Facets

  • When we truly understand, we…

    • Can explain- via generalization and principles; make insightful connections and provide examples or illustrations

    • Can interpret- tell meaningful stories, make the object of understanding personal or accessible

    • Can apply- effectively use and adapt what we know in diverse and real contexts

    • Have perspective- see and hear points of view through critical eyes and ears; see the big picture.

    • Can empathize- find value in what others might find odd or different; perceive sensitively on the basis of prior experience

    • Have self-knowledge- show metacognitive awareness; perceive the factors that shape and impede our own understanding


Understanding knowledge vs understanding

Understanding-Knowledge vs. Understanding

Knowing is not understanding. There is a great difference between knowing and understanding: you can know a lot about something and not really understand it.” -Charles Kettering

  • Knowledge: is what you know (facts and information)

  • Understanding: is the ability to apply what you know and use it to develop a deeper meaning-an inference drawn from facts


Understanding the difference between knowledge and understanding

Understanding-The Difference Between Knowledge and Understanding


Understandings identify activity

Understandings-Identify Activity

  • An effective story engages the reader by setting up tensions about what will happen next.

  • Water covers three-fourths of the earth’s surface.

  • Things are always changing.

  • Correlation does not ensure causality.

  • Decoding is necessary but not sufficient in reading for meaning.


Understanding defining characteristics

Understanding-Defining Characteristics

  • An understanding:

    • Is an important inference, drawn from experience

    • Refers to transferable, big ideas having enduring value beyond a specific topic.

    • Involves abstract ideas

    • Is best acquired by “uncovering” and “doing”

    • Summarizes important strategic principles in skill areas


Types of understanding

Types of Understanding

  • Overarching: frame entire courses and programs of study; provide conceptual framework for curriculum that spirals around the same Understandings unit to unit and grade to grade.

  • Topical: help students come to particular understandings around specific topics and skills; specific to the topic of a unit.

  • Metacognitive/ Reflective: essential to effective learning and performance


Understanding application

Understanding-Application

  • Log in to Atlas and select your course and first unit.

  • Examine the understanding for that unit:

    • Do they fit the characteristics we’ve identified?

    • Are they overarching, topical, or metacognitive?

    • Is the number of understandings sufficient for the unit of study (do more need to be added or do some need to be deleted)?

    • Do your understandings align to the essential questions?

  • Make any necessary adjustments.


Knowledge and skills

Knowledge and Skills

  • In order for students to perform well on assessments and competently answer essential questions, we must ask …

    • What should they KNOW?

    • What should they BE ABLE TO DO?


Key knowledge and key skills

Key Knowledge and Key Skills

  • Open the envelopes at your tables.

  • Sort the statements into two different piles.

  • Be ready to explain your rationale to the group.


Key knowledge defining characteristics

Key Knowledge—Defining Characteristics

  • What you want students to know and understand about the unit or topic you are teaching

  • The facts, concepts, generalizations and principles that are the focus of the curriculum

  • Consciously understood factual information

  • What students can explain to others


Key knowledge defining characteristics1

Key Knowledge—Defining Characteristics

  • What key knowledge will the learner acquire during this unit?

    • Students will know…

      • Vocabulary/terminology

      • Definitions

      • Key factual information

      • Important events and people

      • Sequence/timeline


Key skills defining characteristics

Key Skills—Defining Characteristics

  • What you want students to be able to do.

  • The skills and processes students will acquire or practice as they work with the content of the unit. Think of daily objectives.

  • Contain the processes, procedures, and skills the students will possess that will allow them to apply the knowledge they have gained.

  • Always begin with an action verb.


Key skill statements

Key Skill Statements

Action Verbs

Not Action Verbs

Know

Learn

Memorize

Understand

Appreciate

Watch

Observe

  • Define

  • Describe

  • Compute

  • Interpret

  • Distinguish

  • Sort

  • Predict

  • Solve

  • Construct

  • Create


Key knowledge and key skills examples

Key Knowledge and Key Skills--Examples

  • Formulas for calculating surface area and volume

    • The formula for calculating the volume of a pyramid is 1/3 (B X h).

  • General health problems caused by poor nutrition

  • The steps in the writing process

  • Calculate surface area and volume for various 3-dimensional figures

  • Plan balanced diets for themselves and others

  • Apply the writing process to produce


Key knowledge and key skills1

Key Knowledge and Key Skills

  • Develop a key knowledge statement and a key skills statement for your content area.

  • Share them at your table.


Key knowledge and key skills application

Key Knowledge and Key Skills—Application

  • Open your Atlas to your first unit map.

  • Review the key knowledge and key skills to determine if:

    • They are valid and aligned to current unit standards?

    • Key Knowledge is factual?

    • Key Knowledge is written as a statement?

    • Key Skills begin with an action verb?

    • Key Skills contain processes, procedures and skills?


Key takeaways and questions

Key Takeaways and Questions

  • Summarize each section of Stage 1

  • Most difficult/challenging component

  • The importance of alignment and backwards thinking

  • Questions?


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