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Presentation to VA DOE RPS Student Data. Wednesday, July 19, 2006 Presentation by Deborah Jewell-Sherman, Ed.D. Yvonne W. Brandon, Ed.D. Irving Jones, Ed.D. Larry Everette Kavansa Gardner. Graduation Rate – 12 th Graders. Graduation Cohort Data. 2005 Cohort Data.

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Presentation to va doe rps student data l.jpg

Presentation to VA DOE RPS Student Data

Wednesday, July 19, 2006

Presentation by

Deborah Jewell-Sherman, Ed.D.

Yvonne W. Brandon, Ed.D.

Irving Jones, Ed.D.

Larry Everette

Kavansa Gardner


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Graduation Rate – 12th Graders


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Graduation Cohort Data


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2005 Cohort Data

If possible add previous years’ cohort data analysis (i.e. 2004, 2005)


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Contributing Factors

  • Withdrawals

  • Drop Outs

  • Retentions

  • Mobility – 40+% Yearly


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I. Withdrawal Codes


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Drop Out Rate District Data

  • Reasons for Marked Improvement - 2005

  • Improvement in Reporting System

  • Increased Parental Notification & Home Visits

  • Reclamation of W-8 and W-9

  • Established Truancy Task Force


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Contributing Factors Drop Out Rate


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Contributing Factors

Truancy Data

*2006 – Mayor’s Truancy Initiative

Budget increased from approximately $500K to $1.2 million to address truancy in Richmond City


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Contributing Factors

Group Homes

FYI

John Marshall High School serves students from 29 Group Homes in its Attendance Zone. These include students from across the region and the Commonwealth.


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Strategies

Truancy Conference Data


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Truancy Conference Data

  • 2005 – 7%

  • Reasons:

    • Inconsistent reporting of data

    • Data verification challenges

    • Inadequate training and support for attendance workers

    • Non-alignment with paper reporting and inputing information into data management system


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Truancy Conference Data

  • 2005 – 7%

  • Lessons Learned:

    • Importance of reporting had to stressed

    • Need to have data verification systems in place

    • Need for additional training and support for attendance workers

    • Need for an aligned system that would be monitored frequently


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Truancy Conference Data

  • 2006 – 73%

  • Steps Taken:

    • Provided extensive training for attendance workers and SIS operators around reporting procedures, data input, and importance of accuracy and timeliness

    • Enhanced training for social workers on securing juvenile justice interventions

    • Piloted period based attendance in 6 secondary schools

    • RPS developed automated daily reporting system with funding from RPD


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Truancy Conference Data

  • 2006 – 73%

  • Steps Taken:

    • Coordinated efforts with Mayor’s Truancy Initiative and submitted daily reports to RPS, RPD and JJS

    • Enhanced oversight of school weekly attendance meetings that focused on absences and truancy conferencing

    • Participated in weekly meetings with Truancy reduction partners


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Truancy Conference Data

  • 2006 – 73%

  • Steps Taken:

    • Utilized VDOE’s new EIMS system

    • Aligned responsibilities of IT staff

    • Used grant funds to secure part-time “Home-School” liaisons for 13 schools with greatest need

    • Increased daily use of Parent Link (automated parent notification system) from one to two calls per student absence


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Truancy Conference Data

  • 2006 – 73%

  • Steps Taken:

    • Used Parent Link to send parental notification letter out after the first absence if unable to reach parent by phone

    • Used Parent Link to send parental notification letter out after 3rd absence instead of after the 5th absence

    • Presentations to Juvenile Judges and City Council


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Truancy Conference Data

  • 2006 – 73%

    • RPS social workers increased FTS and CHINS with JJS


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Truancy Conference Data

  • 2007

  • Steps Being Taken:

    • Expand oversight and accountability (Data Administrator in IT Department)

    • Realign staff to provide greater assistance and monitoring at school site

    • Implement period based attendance at all high schools

    • Provide additional training for key staff


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Strategies for Drop Out Prevention

  • Alternative Education – Current

    • Evening HS at RTC

    • GED and HS Completer Programs at ACDC & Community Sites

    • Johns Hopkins University Model for 9th Graders


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Strategies for Drop Out Prevention

  • Alternative Education – Current

    • District-wide 9th Grade Convocation

    • FAST Program for Teen Parents at ACDC

    • Early Head Start Program at JMHS & ACDC

    • Guidance Counselors holding Parent & Student Conferences re: HS Completion Plan


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Strategies for Drop Out Prevention

  • Alternative Education – Future Options*

    • Street Academies (ex. CIS Model)

    • Middle College Program with JSRCC

    • Twilight HS Completer/GED Program at RTC (Include CTE Opportunities)

    • Small Learning Communities for 9th Graders

    • Expansion of Johns Hopkins University Model 9th thru 12th Grade

    • *Additional Funding Necessary for these options


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III. Retention


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Reasons for RetentionElementary

  • Lack of Preschool Readiness

  • Struggling Readers – Phoneme Sounds, Alphabetic Recognition, Fluency, Reading Connected Text and Comprehension & Vocabulary


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Retention


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Reasons for Retention Secondary

  • Challenges of MS to HS Transition

  • Attendance

  • Rigorous Standard and Curriculum

  • Inappropriate Behaviors

  • Lack of Foundational Knowledge

  • Lack of Connection to Learning

  • Peer Influences


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Contributing Factors - Longevity

Students with Disabilities

Categories – 14 to 21+

*Reporting Categories Combined EMR & TMR after 2000


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Contributing Factors – Longevity

Students with Disabilities


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Contributing Factors - Longevity

Students with Disabilities


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Group Homes

John Marshall HS Attendance Zone

John Marshall High School serves students from 29 Group Homes in its Attendance Zone. The majority of these students receive services for their disabilities.


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Strategies for Retention ReductionElementary School Level

  • Alternative Strategies - Current

    • K-2 Readiness is Community Concern

    • Aligned pre-K to 2nd grade curriculum

    • Early Head Start

    • VPI & Head Start

    • Partnerships: City Human Services, Success By 6 and Youth Matters, Northside Initiative with Robbins Foundation, Even Start, VA Literacy Foundation, VCU

    • Mandatory Summer School Pre K thru 5th grade

    • Parent Education Programs


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Strategies for Retention ReductionElementary School Level

  • Alternative Strategies – Current

    • Include strategies being used for SPED and ESL


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Strategies for Retention ReductionSecondary School Level

  • Alternative Strategies - Current

    • Johns Hopkins University 9th Grade Academy Model

      • Professional Development – Academics & Promoting Positive Behaviors

      • Focus on Daily Attendance

      • Goal Setting for HS Career & Beyond

      • Study Skills, Behavioral Skills

      • Positive Adult/Student Relationships

      • Increased disciplinary options (i.e. CCP)


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Strategies for Retention ReductionSecondary School Level

  • Current:

  • In-School Academic Intervention Programs

  • Focus on earning HS credits in MS (ex. Algebra and Earth Science)

  • Professional Development for Regular & SPED

  • Credit Recovery through Night School Programs

  • Leadership Development and Service Learning (needs to be District-wide and beginning in MS)


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Strategies for Retention ReductionSecondary School Level

  • Alternative Strategies - Current:

    • Include strategies for SPED and ESL students


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Strategies for Retention ReductionSecondary School Level

  • Alternative Strategies – Future Options*

    • Incentives for strong 9th grade teachers

    • Intervention Specialists for 9th graders

    • Conflict Resolution & Peer Mediation

    • Extended Day Options for students identified as academically at risk

    • Male Mentoring & Female Mentoring (grades 6-12)

      *These programs also will reduce drop outs.


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Strategies for Retention ReductionSecondary School Level

  • Future Options:

  • Reading Specialists for MS & HS

  • Pregnancy Prevention Programs

  • Expand Teen Parent Educational Opportunities with Child Care

  • Expansion of Career & Technical Education

    *These programs also will reduce drop outs.


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Summary

  • Graduation Rates, while showing improvements, need to increase.

  • RPS, like other urban districts, face serious challenges: drop outs; retentions; teen pregnancies; transiency; societal, environmental and public health issues

  • RPS has made this issue a priority as demonstrated by inclusion in the Balanced Score Card


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Summary

  • This is a community issue that requires buy-in by all and community needs to be part of the solution

  • RPS, in partnership with some entities, is working diligently to increase cohort graduation rates and other indicators of student success

  • Require continuation of State & Federal funds used to improve over the years

  • Require additional funding to implement additional academic and social programs to address needs of students, staff and community


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