The u s constitution
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 13

The U.S. Constitution PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 90 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

The U.S. Constitution. Changing it!. Changing with the Times. The amendment process allows the Constitution to adapt to the changing needs of our nation and society Gone from an agrarian society of 4 million to a high-tech society of 317 million

Download Presentation

The U.S. Constitution

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


The u s constitution

The U.S. Constitution

Changing it!


Changing with the times

Changing with the Times

  • The amendment process allows the Constitution to adapt to the changing needs of our nation and society

    • Gone from an agrarian society of 4 million to a high-tech society of 317 million

    • Portions of USC have been added, deleted, or altered as a result of the 27 amendments


The amendment process

The Amendment Process

  • Article V of the Constitution describes the amendment process.

    • Amendments are proposed by:

      • 2/3 vote of each house of Congress (26/27)

      • By a national convention called by Congress at the request of 2/3 of the state legislatures (1/27)

        • 21st Amendment


Amendment process

Amendment Process

  • Amendments must be ratified:

    • ¾ of state legislatures

    • By conventions of ¾ of the states.


How does the federal amendment process reflect the concept of federalism

How does the federal amendment process reflect the concept of federalism?

  • Amendments are proposed at the national level and ratified at the state level by legislatures or conventions.

  • State can reject an amendment and later decide to ratify it.

    • Can’t change its mind after it votes to ratify it.

  • President can’t veto an amendment.


Popular sovereignty

Popular Sovereignty

  • Amendment process is based on Popular Sovereignty

    • People elect reps that vote to propose and ratify amendments

    • Supreme Court has ruled that States can’t require a proposed amendment be approved by popular vote before state legislature can ratify it.


What is the purpose of the bill of rights

What is the purpose of the Bill of Rights?

  • They spell out the basic rights and liberties of all Americans


Proposed amendments

Proposed Amendments

  • Most suggested amendments are never proposed by Congress

    • Only 33 out of some 15,000 suggested amendments sent to states

  • Six proposed amendments were not ratified by the states

    • Congress can set a time limit for ratification – usually seven years.


Proposed but not ratified

Proposed but not Ratified

  • 1 – set membership of House; 1789

  • 2. no nobility granted – lose citizenship: 1810

  • 3. slave amendment :1861

  • 4. Child Labor Amendment :1924

  • 5. Equal Rights Amendment – ERA:1972

  • 6. Washington DC –representation in Congress.: 1978


The 27 amendments

The 27 Amendments

  • Amendments proposed in response to legal disputes, social conflicts, or perceived constitutional problems

  • 1-10 – 1791 – Bill of Rights


27 amendments

27 Amendments

  • 11th – 1795 – states are immune from certain lawsuits

  • 12th – 1804 – changes in electoral college procedures

  • 13th – 1865 – abolition of slavery

  • 14th – 1868 – citizenship, equal protection, and due process

  • 15th – 1870 – gave black men the right to vote


27 amendments1

27 Amendments

  • 16th – 1913 – Gave Congress the power to collect income tax

  • 17th – 1913 – popular election of U.S. Senators

  • 18th – 1919 - prohibition of Alcohol

  • 19th – 1920 – women’s suffrage

  • 20th – 1933 –changes dates for presidential and congressional terms

  • 21st – 1933 – repeal of 18th


27 amendments2

27 Amendments

  • 22nd – 1951 – limit of presidential terms

  • 23rd – 1961 – District of Columbia allowed to vote in presidential elections

  • 24th – 1964 – ban on poll taxes

  • 25th – 1967 – presidential succession, vice presidential vacancy – presidential disability

  • 26th – 1971 – voting age lowered to 18

  • 27th – 1992 –Congress can’t vote itself a pay raise.


  • Login