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Centre for Research Support and Technology Transfer - SFT. Commercial Exploitation of Inventions at the Technische Universität München. Dr. Alexandros Papaderos Inventor Consultant Technische Universität München. WIPO UNIVERSITY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVE:

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Commercial Exploitation of Inventions at the Technische Universität München

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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Commercial Exploitation of Inventionsat the Technische Universität München

Dr. Alexandros Papaderos

Inventor Consultant

Technische Universität München

WIPO UNIVERSITY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVE:

Subregional Workshop on Searching of

IP Information for University IP Coordinators

Vilnius, Lithuania

May 18 and 19, 2006


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Outline

  • Short presentation of the Technische Universität München

  • Knowledge and Technology Transfer from Universities

  • Implementation of the Bayern Patent Project at the TUM

  • 3 success stories from the TUM

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

The Technische Universität München

  • founded in 1868 by King Ludwig II. as “Polytechnische Schule München”, since 1970: University

  • highly-modern research and teaching institution offering12 faculties as well as numerous scientific, educational and administrative facilities

  • four leaved model: Natural Sciences, Engineering, Life Sciences, Medical Science

  • interdisciplinary collaboration and innovation-promoting processes of a future-oriented approach

  • Nobel Prize Laureates, famous scientists and inventors including: Rudolf Diesel, Carl von Linde, Willy Messerschmitt, Emil Erlenmeyer, Hans Fischer, Robert Huber

© Dipl.-Biol. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

The Technische Universität München

Summer semester 2006

  • students: ca. 20,000, 30% female

  • freshmen: 4,800

  • graduates: 2,800

  • students from abroad: ca. 20%

  • 260 chairs, 440 professors

  • 8,500 staff (academic andnon-academic staff

  • total budget 2004: € 678.3 million

    • research funding: € 137.5 million

    • fundraising: € 81 million (endowed funds since 1998)

  • for further information, please see also: www.tum.de

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Knowledge and Technology Transfer

Knowledge and Technology Transfer is the connecting link between basic and applied research and between applied research and development

  • commercial utilization and economic exploitation of IPR, esp. patents, are one aspect of Knowledge and Technology Transfer between science and economy

  • licensing and sale of patents have a long tradition in the Anglo-Saxon countries (Research Corporation founded 1912 in the USA)

    • in other European countries (including Germany) the active commercial utilization and economic exploitation of IPR is now evolving

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Technology Transfer from Universities

IPR:

  • licensing of IPR to companies (IPR remains the university)

  • sale and assignment of IPR to companies (IPR is assigned to the company)

  • provision of IPR to university start-up companies:

  • exclusive licensing (IPR remains with the university)

  • sale of IPR (IPR is assigned to the company)

  • sale or exclusive licensing of IPR; university obtains in return shares of the company (IPR is assigned to the company)

  • contract research and services offered by the universities

    (in most cases IPR is assigned to the contractor)

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Technology Transfer through IPR

USA/Germany

  • USA

    • in 1980: ~ 250 patent applications (1980: Bayh-Dole Act)

    • in 1991: ~ 1,600 patent applications

    • in 2003: ~ 8,000 patent applications

  • Germany

    • before 2002: negligible amount of university patent applications

    • 2002: abolition of the “Professor’s Privilege”

    • in 2004 519 patent applications in the name of German universities, including technical colleges

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Technology Transfer through IPR

Benchmarking USA

  • AUTM Licensing Survey: Fiscal Year 2004 (approx. 195 institutions)

    • 16,871inventions reported (82% potentially patentable inventions)

    • 10,517new patents filed, 3,680 patents issued

    • 462new companies (in 52% of the cases institutions received an equity interest)

    • license income: 1.385billion US-$

  • since 1980: a total of more than 4,543companies, 2,671 still operating

  • since 1998: 3,114new products on the market

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Technology Transfer through IPR

The situation in Germany before the year 2002:

  • legal framework (“Professor’s Privilege”)

  • scientists in Germany focus more on publications

  • lack of interest from the inventors and universities for the patent system

  • lack of resources for the financing of patent applications, etc.

  • lack of infrastructure for patenting and commercial exploitation

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Bavarian Universities

and Technical Colleges

BavariaHigh-Tech

Initiative

Fraunhofer Patent Center

for the German Research

Commercial Exploitation

of University Inventions in Bavaria

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Promotion

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Starting pointsof the Bayern Patent Project

  • raise awareness for the importance of patents

  • promote and intensify the patent culture

  • provide funds for patenting and commercialising of inventions

  • provide infrastructure:

    • Inventor Consultants

    • Patent-

    • Licensing Bureau

e.g. at the TUM

at the Fraunhofer Patent Centre for the German Research (FhG-PST)

© Dipl.-Biol. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Mission of the Inventor Consultant at the TUM

  • the Inventor Consultant is the junction between inventors,TUM administration, Technology Transfer Agency (Bayern Patent Project),

    industry etc.

e.g.:

  • consulting and support for the inventors

  • contact with high inventive potential research groups of the TUM

  • support for the identification of patentable research results

  • organisation of information events, conferences, workshops etc.

  • enforce the legal frame

  • mission is complemented by the Bayern Patent Project

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Mission of the Patent Bureau

  • evaluation of inventions (patentability, technical feasibility, economic exploitability)

  • recommendation to the TUM whether to claim or release the invention

  • instructing patent attorneys, supervising patent applications and patenting process

  • co-ordination regarding patenting strategy with the TUM according to business and market specific criteria (what kind of protection to apply for, in which countries, maintain applications etc.)

  • initiation of licensing activities by the Licensing Bureau

  • central database for patented technologies

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Mission of the Licensing Bureau

  • commercial exploitation of inventions covered by patent applications

  • co-ordination of the licensing strategy in co-operation with the TUM

  • drafting of technology offers

  • search for potential licensing partners

  • presentation of the invention at companies

  • negotiation of the conditions for the licensing agreement between TUM and industry partner

  • supervision of licensing agreements

  • balancing accounts of licensing revenues

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Special provisions for university employeesin the German Employees’ Inventions Act

  • University employee

  • decision, if and when to disclose the invention

  • in case of disclosure, obligation to:

     report the invention to the university

     indicate the disclosure date (normally two months before disclosure)

  • University

  • decision whether to claim the invention or release it (4 months)

  • in the case of claiming  obligation to file a patent application

  • in the case of realization of profits  obligation to compensate the inventor

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Workflow in case of a invention

  • inventor contacts the Inventor Consultant for (legal) advice

  • inventor reports his invention to the TUM

  • Bayern Patent Project evaluates the invention and gives a recommendation

  • TUM decides either to claim the invention or to release the invention to the employee

  • in the case of claiming: TUM files a patent application (mostly in Germany)

  • parallel to patenting the invention: commercial exploitation begins

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Promotion

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Sharing of revenues and costs

RevenuesCosts

Inventor30%0% !!!

TUM 45%10%

BayernPatent 25%100% !!!

1 : 50% for the academic group/institute/department

© Dipl.-Biol. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Statistical Data from the TUM

*

*:09/2000-12/2000

*: 194 inventions are made within the framework of industry research funding projects and are assigned to contractor

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Example of a successfully commercialized IPR I:

Spider Silks:

  • exceed the characteristics and properties of man-made materials

  • superior mechanical properties such as strength, toughness etc.

Self assembling spider silks

  • identification of a gene for the fabrication of nature-like spider silks

  • transfer in bacterial cells, which produce spider silks

Commercial applications:

  • medical products (i.e. as non allergic material in wound-closure systems, artificial ligaments, tendons)

  • textiles (i.e. protective clothing, parachutes, body armour, ropes, fishing nets)

  • cosmetics

  • leather and paper refinement

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Example of a successfully commercialized IPR II:

  • beercontaining xanthohumol : XAN Wheat Beer and

  • XAN Wellness Drink

    Xanthohumol:

    Xanthohumol from hop can dispose free radicals due to its antioxidant nature and can thus contribute to keep the somatic cells healthy

    Special brewing method (pending patent application):

    concentration of the natural active ingredient Xanthohumol is up to 15 times higher in the XAN Wheat Beer and up to 50 times higher in the alcohol-free XAN Wellness drink in comparison to usual wheat beers

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Example of a successfully commercialized IPR III:

ANTICALINS® technology:

  • ANTICALINS® are engineered ligand-binding proteins with antibody-like functions

  • therapeutic use in a variety of diseases, particularly in cancer and cardiovascular diseases

  • technology invented in a large part at the TUM and developed at PIERIS Proteolab AG

  • Cooperation and license agreement between TUM and PIERIS

  • PIERIS was founded in January 2001 – after being awarded the first prize in the Munich Business Plan Contest 2000

  • Laboratories and offices are located at Freising-Weihenstephan, well situated in the neighbourhood of the TU Munich life science campus

see also: www.pieris.biz

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Key Factors for a successfulIP- and TT-management

  • establishment of a systematic IP- and TT-management process

  • backup through the academic and administrative management in form of IP- and TT-guidelines

  • establishment of patent and licensing bureaus and use of all communication channels

  • information about possible IP-exploitation partners

  • further education of the staff members

  • professional contractual commitments for all IP- and TT-matters

  • soft factors: measures for establishing an IP-culture

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

AgreementsSupervision

Commercial Exploitation

Protection

Evaluation

Ongoing Activities

  • identification and evaluation of the market relevance of the invention

  • evaluation of protectability

  • check-up with existing patent portfolio

  • identification of exploitation strategies

  • development of exploitation strategies, e.g. licensing, transfer, start-up etc.

  • implementa-tion of the exploitation strategies

  • close contact to researchers

  • continuous analyzing of the research activities

  • screening of patent literature

  • IP-culture and infrastructure

  • patent application

  • defence against infringers

  • revenue management

  • monitoring of license agreements

  • legal problems

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Contact:

Dr. Alexandros Papaderos

Patent- and Licensing Bureau

Technische Universität München

Arcisstraße 19

80333 München

Tel.: +49 / 89 / 289-22611

E-Mail: [email protected]

internet: www.wimes.hr.tu-muenchen.de/erfinder.html

www.bayernpatent.de

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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Centre for Research Support

and Technology Transfer - SFT

Remotely Controlled Steerable Ball (US 6855028)

What is claimed is:1. A remote controlled ball amusement device adapted to aerodynamic change trajectory in mid-flight as it is propelled through air...

Thank you for your attention! Questions?

© Dr. Alexandros Papaderos, Inventor Consultant, Technische Universität München


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