Defining developing and strengthening mentoring for junior staff a workshop for mentors and mentees
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DEFINING, DEVELOPING AND STRENGTHENING MENTORING FOR JUNIOR STAFF: A WORKSHOP FOR MENTORS AND MENTEES PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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DEFINING, DEVELOPING AND STRENGTHENING MENTORING FOR JUNIOR STAFF: A WORKSHOP FOR MENTORS AND MENTEES. presented by Prof. Wendy C. Crone University of Wisconsin -Madison. Workshop Agenda:.

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DEFINING, DEVELOPING AND STRENGTHENING MENTORING FOR JUNIOR STAFF: A WORKSHOP FOR MENTORS AND MENTEES

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Defining developing and strengthening mentoring for junior staff a workshop for mentors and mentees

DEFINING, DEVELOPING AND STRENGTHENING MENTORING FOR JUNIOR STAFF: A WORKSHOP FOR MENTORS AND MENTEES

presented by Prof. Wendy C. CroneUniversity of Wisconsin -Madison


Workshop agenda

Workshop Agenda:

  • 10:30 Introductory remarks- developing a shared definition of the term mentor- exploring mentor/mentee expectations- activity on building networks

  • 11:00 Mentor & Mentees move to breakout rooms and discuss topics:- Establishing Expertise- Documenting Accomplishments- Balancing Teaching, Research and Service

  • 11:45 Closing discussion on developing a range of mentoring relationships with a focus on establishing peer mentoring groups

  • 12:00 adjourn


How do you define the term mentor

How do you define the term MENTOR?

  • Write your definition on the worksheet (Activity 1).

  • Discuss with the person next you.

  • Share with the group.


Mentor aka

Mentor AKA

  • Advisor

  • Guide

  • Supporter

  • Sponsor

  • Host

  • Role Model

  • Exemplar


What types of issues are discussed with a mentor activity 2 small group brainstorming

WHAT TYPES OF ISSUES ARE DISCUSSED WITH A MENTOR? (ACTIVITY 2: SMALL GROUP BRAINSTORMING)


What types of issues should be discussed with a mentor small group brainstorming activity

WHAT TYPES OF ISSUES SHOULD BE DISCUSSED WITH A MENTOR? (SMALL GROUP BRAINSTORMING ACTIVITY)

  • research/teaching/service obligations

  • setting goals

  • building your network

  • handling conflict

  • understanding group/program/department politics

  • understanding the culture of your discipline

  • moving you toward independence and proficiency

  • managing your time

  • balancing family and career

  • knowing when and how to say "No"


Defining developing and strengthening mentoring for junior staff a workshop for mentors and mentees

MENTEE EXPECTATIONS:WHAT ROLES DO YOU ENVISION THAT YOUR MENTOR WILL PLAY?(ACTIVITY 3: INDEPENDENT EXERCISE)

MENTOR EXPECTATIONS:WHAT ROLES DO YOU ENVISION TAKING ON IN A MENTORING RELATIONSHIP?(ACTIVITY 3: INDEPENDENT EXERCISE)


Expectations

Expectations

Mentee:

Mentor:


Questions to ask yourself when developing a new mentoring relationship

QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF WHEN DEVELOPING A NEW MENTORING RELATIONSHIP:

  • Do you feel comfortable giving/asking for advice and accepting criticism?

  • Can you meet frequently enough for the needs of the mentor/mentee relationship?

  • How formal do you want the relationship to be?

  • Can you develop a productive and non-threatening relationship with your mentor/mentee?

  • Should you share everything or be selective about what you discuss?

  • Is the mentor familiar with the academic position and institution of the mentee?


What does the mentor have to gain

What Does the Mentor Have To Gain?

Research shows that those who mentor gain from “contributing to something beyond themselves”* and I would argue that they also develop a broader vision of their institution and field through the perspective of their mentee as well as a reinvigorated enthusiasm for their own work.*[Nakamura and Shernoff, Good Mentoring: Fostering Excellent Practice in Higher Education, 2009]


Where can you look for mentors activity 4 small group brainstorming

WHERE CAN YOU LOOK FOR MENTORS? (ACTIVITY 4: SMALL GROUP BRAINSTORMING)


Where can you look for mentors activity 4 small group brainstorming1

WHERE CAN YOU LOOK FOR MENTORS? (ACTIVITY 4: SMALL GROUP BRAINSTORMING)

  • colleagues in your department

  • colleagues outside your department and at other institutions

  • formal mentoring programs offered by your institution or professional society

  • other junior faculty who can provide peer mentoring

  • individuals in the community not associated with your university


Preparing for the break out session

Preparing for the Break Out Session


Workshop agenda1

Workshop Agenda:

  • Mentor/Mentee Pairs move to breakout rooms and discuss topics:- Establishing Expertise (Activity 5)- Documenting Accomplishments (Activity 6) - Balancing Teaching, Research, Service (Activity 7)

  • Room Assignments:

    • Inside MMR: GreyCollege of Science & Engineering

    • Foyer of MMR: BlueCollege of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences

    • Room CYC-306: OrangeCollege of Business with the School of Law

  • Return at 11:45


Mentor mentee pair discussions

MENTOR/MENTEE PAIR DISCUSSIONS

  • Establishing Expertise (Activity 5)

  • Documenting Accomplishments (Activity 6)

  • Balancing Teaching, Research, Service (Activity 7)


Defining developing and strengthening mentoring for junior staff a workshop for mentors and mentees

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Beyond the mentor pair

Beyond the Mentor Pair


Think of mentoring more broadly

Think of Mentoring More Broadly

The traditional mentor-mentee dyad model is what we first think of when we hear the term mentoring, but we really should think more broadly.

  • An evaluation conducted on the WFMP by WISELI showed that one-on-one mentoring pairings may not provide the total solution.[WISELI, “Evaluation of the Women Faculty Mentoring Program at the University of Wisconsin – Madison,” 2004]

  • Research by Prof. Monica Higgins of Harvard’s Graduate School of Education and Prof. David Thomas of Harvard’s School of Business supports the idea that broader models of mentoring are effective when longitudinal data is taken into account. Their study compared the impact of individual mentors with “constellations” of supporting individuals in a variety of mentor-related roles.

    • “While the quality of one’s primary developer affects short-term career outcomes, it is the composition and quality of an individual’s entire constellation of developmental relationships that account for long-run protégé career outcomes.”[M.C. Higgins and D.A. Thomas, “Constellations and careers: Toward understanding the effects of multiple developmental relationships,” Journal of Organizational Behavior, 22, 2001, p. 223.]


Building your professional network activity 8 adapted from faught stqe 72 73 2001

Building Your Professional Network(Activity 8: Adapted from Faught, STQE, 72-73, 2001)

  • Step 1: Identify your goals:

    • Do you want to improve your network to facilitate your research?

    • Do you want to develop your reputation outside your institution?

    • Other purposes?

  • Step 2: Build a list of contacts:

    • Identify relevant people. Who do you already know? Who do you need to know?

    • If you don’t know individual names, identify the types of people you need in your network and then seek out individuals who are that type.


Building your professional network activity 8 adapted from faught stqe 72 73 20011

Building Your Professional Network(Activity 8: Adapted from Faught, STQE, 72-73, 2001)

  • Step 3: Develop strategies to court these people individually:

    • Talk to your colleagues and mentors about who they know.

    • Identify professional organizations where you might meet people important for your network.

    • Work to identify a way to meet each person face-to-face.

    • Reciprocity is important. Don’t always ask for something every time you interact with a person. Don’t ask for something at your first contact with someone you have just met. Try to figure out a way for you to give something. This is why it is important to build your network before you need it.


Building your professional network activity 8 adapted from faught stqe 72 73 20012

Building Your Professional Network(Activity 8: Adapted from Faught, STQE, 72-73, 2001)

  • Step 4: Maintain your network.

    • What can you do to follow up occasionally with people in your network?

    • Schedule time each week to tend your network.


Peer mentoring

Peer Mentoring


Starting your own peer mentoring group

Starting Your Own Peer Mentoring Group

  • Identify a common topic of interest for the group, e.g. proposal writing, teaching in your disciplinary area, parenting while professing, etc.  

  • Identify a few colleagues who you would like to invite to join you in the group. Have a conversation with each of them about their interest in meeting regularly to discuss the topic. Identify the best venue for the meetings and timing for the meetings.

  • Set up an email group or listserve with the initial members and send out a formal announcement.

  • Develop consensus within the group at the initial meeting about the formality of meetings, frequency of meetings, optimal size of the group, and responsibilities of the group members.  

  • Grow the group to a sustainable size.

  • As the “convener” of the group, you will be responsible for sending out reminders for meetings and keeping the momentum of the group going. It is good practice to rotate the “convener” responsibility to a new individual for a group that meets for more than one year.


A resource to facilitate mentoring relationships

A Resource to Facilitate Mentoring Relationships:

  • Survive and Thrive: A Guide for Untenured Facultyby Wendy C. Crone can be downloaded from the Morgan & Claypool Publishers web site athttp://www.morganclaypool.com/toc/eng/1/1from any UW - Madison campus IP address (you must be on campus). Also available in paperback from Amazon.com.

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