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Earth Materials Mock Rocks. Lynn Garner and Lori Mitchell. What Are Earth Materials?. An earth material is any natural material that is not now living on the earth’s surface. Vocabulary. Geology : the study of the Earth

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Earth Materials Mock Rocks

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Earth materials mock rocks l.jpg

Earth MaterialsMock Rocks

Lynn Garner and Lori Mitchell


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What Are Earth Materials?

  • An earth material is any natural material that is not now living on the earth’s surface.


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Vocabulary

  • Geology: the study of the Earth

  • Geologist: A Scientist who studies Earth materials, such as the rocks and minerals on the Earth


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WHAT ARE SOME PROPERTIES WE CAN USE TO DESCRIBE ROCKS?


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Rock Properties

  • Texture

  • Color

  • Shape or edges

  • Size

  • Mass

  • Smell


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MOCK ROCKS

  • CHALLENGE: YOU WILL DESCRIBE THE ROCK IN DETAIL SO THAT LATER ON IF THE ROCK IS CHANGED IN ANY WAY, YOU WILL HAVE A RECORD TO REFER TO.


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TOOLS AND NOTEBOOKS

  • HAND LENSMETER TAPEBALANCESMASS SETSEARTH MATERIAL NOTEBOOK PAGES 2 & 3.


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Measurement Vocabulary

  • Diameter: the distance across a circular object

  • Circumference: the distance around a circular object

  • Depth: how thick an object is

  • Meter tape: measures linear dimensions

  • Balance: measures mass (You weigh a mock rock using a balance to determine its mass.)


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MATERIALS NEEDED

  • 2 paper plates

  • 2 mock rocks

  • 1 set of measuring tools

  • Colored pencils or crayons


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MAKE YOUR OBSERVATIONS

  • Carefully record all measurements.

  • Make your drawings neat and precise.


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Mock Rocks


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Real Rocks


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READ WRITTEN IN STONE


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He Ain’t Nothing but a rock hound

He’s nothing but a rock hound

Diggin’ all the time

He’s nothing but a rock hound

Diggin’ all the time

He ain’t never going to stop

Sniffin out the minerals in a mine


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TAKE MOCK ROCKS APART

  • How can we determine the ingredients of rocks?

  • Take your rock apart using your pick (nail)

  • Group the ingredients

  • Record results.


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Vocabulary

  • Minerals: one ingredient in the earth’s crust that can’t be broken down - minerals make up rocks

  • Rocks: earth materials made up of different ingredients called minerals – rocks are made up of more than one mineral/ingredient


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  • DO YOU THINK THE GRAY MATERIAL CAN BE SEPARATED ANY FURTHER.

  • DISCUSS THIS WITH YOUR GROUP


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MATERIALS

  • 1 VIAL PER PAIRCUP OF WATERSYRINGEPAGE 5 OF NOTEBOOK


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PROCEDURE

  • Fill the vials one-third full with leftover gray material

  • Add 25 ml of water to the vials

  • Snap on the cap and hold it tightly while shaking for a few minutes.

  • Observe the contents and draw a picture in the first vial outline.

  • Record observations


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REFLECTIONS

  • How has water helped to separate the rock ingredient?

  • What do you notice about the way the materials are beginning to settle?

  • What do you think will happed if the vials settle overnight?

  • Do you think there will be anything left in the water.

  • What will you observe if the ingredient dissolves?


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Rocks

Made up of different ingredients

Rocks can be broken down into different minerals.

Minerals

Made up of only one ingredient

Minerals can’t be broken down any more.

What is the difference in rocksand minerals?


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Vocabulary

  • Minerals: one ingredient in the earth’s crust that can’t be broken down - minerals make up rocks

  • Rocks: earth materials made up of different ingredients called minerals – rocks are made up of more than one mineral/ingredient

  • Property: something you can observe, such as size, color, shape, or texture

  • Crystal: the solid form of a material that can be identified by its shape or pattern


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OBSERVING CRYSTALS

  • What happened to the liquid?

  • Use the crystal identification sheet to identify more ingredients in the mock rock

  • Crystals are a solid form of a material that can be identified by its characterist shape or pattern.


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Rocks Science Content

  • Rocks can be separated into their components

  • Rocks exhibit a variety of properties, including shape, size, color, and texture.

  • Water, setting, and evaporation can separate rocks into their components.

  • Crystals form from evaporation of a saltwater mixture.

  • Rocks are composed of earth materials called minerals that cannot be physically broken apart any further

  • Rocks are made of ingredients called minerals.


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Bibliography

  • www.fossweb.com

  • http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.dec.ny.gov/images/environmentdec_images/1656acidrainstone.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.dec.ny.gov/environmentdec/18654.html&usg=__Lv0W6RpsLodmeRpVdAErcbOJYSA=&h=384&w=252&sz=62&hl=en&start=205&tbnid=PuW5MzTrBL62gM:&tbnh=123&tbnw=81&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dacid%2Brain%26gbv%3D2%26ndsp%3D20%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Dactive%26sa%3DN%26start%3D200

  • http://www.windows.ucar.edu/earth/Atmosphere/images/acidrain_sm.jpg


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