Metro ecsu linda harvieux august 12 2011
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PLCs for Leadership Teams SEMLAC – Day Two PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Metro ECSU Linda Harvieux August 12, 2011. PLCs for Leadership Teams SEMLAC – Day Two. Agenda. Welcome and Grounding Sustaining the Culture and Growth of the PLC: Are we a group or a team? Mapping Your Route: The Four PLC Questions: What is the work? Where is your team? What’s next?

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PLCs for Leadership Teams SEMLAC – Day Two

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Metro ecsu linda harvieux august 12 2011

Metro ECSU

Linda Harvieux

August 12, 2011

PLCs for Leadership TeamsSEMLAC – Day Two

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Agenda

Agenda

  • Welcome and Grounding

  • Sustaining the Culture and Growth of the PLC: Are we a group or a team?

  • Mapping Your Route:

  • The Four PLC Questions: What is the work? Where is your team? What’s next?

    • What do we expect the students to learn?

    • How will we know?

  • Mapping Your Route Continued:

  • The Four PLC Questions: What is the work? Where is your team? What’s next?

    • What will we do if the students don’t learn?

    • What will we do if they already know it?

  • Action Planning

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Grounding ordered sharing

“The message should be, ‘We did then what we knew how to do. Now that we know better, we can do better.” DuFour, pg. 255

Grounding: Ordered Sharing

  • “The message should be, ‘We did then what we knew how to do. Now that we know better, we can do better.”

    DuFour, DuFour, Eaker & Many. pg. 255

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Team building and networking are we a group or a team

Team Building and Networking:Are We a Group or a Team?

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Plcs for leadership teams semlac day two

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Plcs for leadership teams semlac day two

How did you do?

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Plcs for leadership teams semlac day two

Try Again

Make a plan

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Plcs for leadership teams semlac day two

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Plcs for leadership teams semlac day two

How did you do?

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Consensus building

Consensus Building

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Criteria for consensus building

Criteria for consensus building

Things to think about when deciding whether to use consensus or not….

  • How much support or buy-in do you need in order to implement.

  • History.

  • Past successes.

  • Skills of the group.

  • Volatility.

  • Confidentiality.

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Achieving consensus

Achieving consensus

Which of these do you believe defines consensus:

  • All of us can embrace the proposal.

  • All of us can endorse the proposal.

  • All of us can live with the proposal.

  • All of us can agree not to sabotage the proposal.

  • We have a majority-at least 51 percent-in support of the proposal.

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Consensus occurs

Consensus occurs….

When the group reaches a single solution or decision and each member of the group can say:

  • I believe you understand my point of view.

  • I believe I understand your point of view.

  • I will support the outcome because it was reached openly and fairly.

  • I believe it is in the best interest of the entire group.

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Consensus does not mean

Consensus does not mean….

  • A unanimous vote.

  • Everyone’s first choice.

  • That everyone agrees. (Enough participants need to be in favor of to get the decision carried out.)

    NOT ALL DECISIONS SHOULD BE

    MADE BY CONSENSUS

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Consensus happens when

Consensus happens when….

  • All points of view have not merely been heard, but actively solicited.

  • The will of the group emerges even to those who most oppose it.

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Setting up for success

Setting up for success

  • What are the worst possible outcomes if we don’t do this?

  • What are the worst possible outcomes if we do this?

  • What are the best possible outcomes if we don’t do this?

  • What are the best possible outcomes if we do this?

  • Use “worst possible” as a planning tool to identify what needs to be done to be sure these outcomes don’t happen.

  • Use “best possible” as tool to identify what has to be done to be sure these outcomes happen.

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Fist to five strategy

Fist to five strategy

5. Fingers. I love this proposal.

4. Fingers. I strongly agree.

3. Fingers. The proposal is okay with me. I am willing to go along with it.

2. Fingers. I have reservations and am not yet ready to support this proposal.

1. Finger. I am opposed to this proposal.

Fist: If I had the authority, I would veto this proposal, regardless of the will of the group.

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Working through group consensus

Working through group consensus

When the group gets stuck….

What to say when the group gets stuck

or is running out of time.

Ask….

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Working through group consensus1

Working through group consensus

When the group gets stuck…

  • Go back to points you all agree upon. List them.

  • Go back to the polar points. What would make this something you could live with?

  • Take a break (walk around).

  • Change facilitators.

  • Put a hold on the issue.

  • Use sufficient consensus.

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Working thru group consensus

Working thru group consensus

Questions to ask about the process:

  • Have we fully involved everyone as participants in the problem-solving process?

  • Have we listened carefully to all points of view, particularly the unpopular ones?

  • Have we seriously faced any emerging conflict in our group and tried to reconcile differences?

    Pledge to revisit within a certain time.

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Consensus continuum

Consensus continuum

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Managing complex change

Managing complex change

CHANGE

CONFUSION

ANXIETY

GRADUAL CHANGE

FRUSTRATION

FALSE STARTS

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The four plc questions what is the work where is your team what s nex t

The Four PLC Questions: What is the work? Where is your team? What’s next?

  • Assessing your team:

    • Focus on Student Learning

    • Collaboration

    • Focus on Results

  • Find the “Self-Assessment for a Focus on Learning” in your binder (end of day 2).

  • Read through the criteria and match with the four questions.

  • Save this assessment to complete as we investigate the work of your team.

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Using the agenda as a discussion guide and a log

Using the Agenda as a Discussion Guide and a Log

24

In This Section:

  • Team roles are recorded

  • Document member participation to keep all members accountable and informed

25

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Plcs for leadership teams semlac day two

Non-Negotiables

Define essential learning and use common assessments

Everyone participates and works toward the common goal – achievement for all students

Teams make individual norms and honor their team norms

-adapted from DuFour, et. al.

26

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Why norms

Why Norms?

“There is such a thing as group IQ. While a group can be no smarter than the sum total of the knowledge and skills of its members, it can be much “dumber” if its internal workings don’t allow people to share their talents.”

-Sternberg, 198

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Norms

Norms

  • Norms make sure all the team members can participate by having solid “internal workings”.

    • How will your norms help your team develop solid “internal workings”?

    • What will the team do about “norm-breaking”?

      • What do we do about the person who doesn’t come?

      • What do we co about the person who comes but doesn’t participate?

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Example norms structural and functional

Example Norms: Structural and Functional

  • We will not interrupt.

  • We will start and end on time.

  • We will use an agenda and log.

  • We will engage in deep listening assuming positive intentions.

  • We will use our time to focus on student learning.

  • Our meetings will be guided by the four critical questions.

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Centerpiece activity norms

Centerpiece Activity: Norms

29

  • Centerpiece Activity:

    • Working in your group, first silently respond to the norm cards in the middle of the table, one at a time.

    • After time is called, assign a facilitator to process each norm.

    • Read aloud the ideas created as a group.

    • Synthesize the ideas into one all-encompassing statement.

    • Describe how that norm with look – document for future reference.

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Your team focus

Your Team Focus

30

27

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Finding a district and or school focus

Finding a District and/or School Focus

  • Use summative results : MCA, NWEA, other standardized tests and classroom summative assessments to identify topic and content strands to focus on

  • Evaluate content area student skills and learning strategies to identify skill based focus areas

  • Identify common skills across curricular areas to identify skill based focus areas

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Content focus schoolwide reading or math

Content Focus: Schoolwide Reading or Math

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Common course different content skill focus

Common Course/Different Content: Skill Focus

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Common skills across curricular areas

Common Skills Across Curricular Areas

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Your team focus1

Your Team Focus

35

27

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Back to the four questions and the agenda

Back to the Four Questions and the Agenda

  • Find the packets of “Four Questions” and a blank “Four Question” grid.

  • Sort the questions strips in the appropriate section of the grid.

  • Check your work on the completed grid.

  • Add 2-3 questions of your own in each section of the grid.

  • Add questions as we move through the day.

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The four plc questions what do we expect our students to learn

The Four PLC Questions:What Do We Expect Our Students to Learn?

Collaborative TeamsData/Assessment

Student Learning

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Starting with the common focus

Starting with the Common Focus

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What do we expect our students to learn

What do we expect our students to learn?

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Identifying priority standards aka power standards essential learnings

Identifying Priority Standards(AKA: Power Standards, Essential Learnings)

  • Priority Standards Defined:

    Priority Standards are a carefully selected subset of the total list of the grade-specific and course- specific standards within each content area that students must know and be able to do by the end of the each school year in order to be prepared to enter the next grade level or course.

    Ainsworth, 2003; Reeves, 2001, 2002

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Prioritize don t eliminate

Prioritize – Don’t Eliminate

Priority Standards are not all that we teach; rather, they represent those prioritized learning outcome that are absolutely essential for all students to know and be able to do.

Ainsworth, 2003

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Supporting standards defined

Supporting Standards Defined

Supporting standards are those standards that support, connect to, or enhance the Priority Standards. They are taught within the context of the Priority Standards, but do not receive the same degree of instruction and assessment emphasis as do the Priority Standards.

Ainsworth

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Criteria for selecting priority standards

Criteria for Selecting Priority Standards

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Evaluating readiness endurance and leverage

Evaluating Readiness, Endurance and Leverage

Use three criteria when considering which are “priority standards”:

  • What they need to know and be able to do in the next grade, (Readiness) and across content areas. (Leverage)

  • What they need to know and be able to do in the way of life skills. (Endurance)

  • What they need to know and be able to do on all high stakes district or state assessments. (High Stakes Testing)

    (Ainsworth, 2003)

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Guiding questions

Guiding Questions

  • Endurance

    • Are the students expected to retain the skills/knowledge long after the test is over?

  • Leverage

    • Is this skill/knowledge applicable to many academic disciplines?

  • Readiness for the Next Level of Learning?

    • Is this skill/knowledge preparing the student for success in the next grade or course?

      Reeves, 2003

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Using the data as a criteria

Using the Data as a Criteria

  • Using results from the “Data Retreat Process” identify subjects and strands in which all students or student groups are not proficient or are showing the largest proficiency gaps.

  • Triangulate the data results with a variety of standardized tests, classroom screeners, common formative assessments, other classroom data and teacher observation.

  • Return to the standards to prioritize.

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Plcs for leadership teams semlac day two

Determining Power Standards Template

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Resources for developing priority standards

Resources for Developing Priority Standards

  • Ainsworth, L. (2003a) Power Standards: Identifying the standards that matter the most. Englewood, CO: Advanced Learning Press.

  • Ainsworth, L. (2003b). “Unwrapping the standards: A simple process to make standards manageable. Englewood, CO: Advanced Learning Press.

  • Ainsworth, L. and Viegut, D. (2006). Common formative assessments: How to connect standards based instruction and assessment. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

  • Stiggins, R.J., Arter, J. A., Chappuis, J. & Chappuis, S. (2006). Classroom assessment for student learning: Doing it right- using it well. Portland, OR- ETS Assessment Training Institute.

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Setting smart goals to focus the team

Setting SMART Goals to Focus the Team

  • Choose a Priority Standard for the team focus

  • Agenda Item: “Deconstruct the Standard”

    • What do we expect the students to learn?

      • What is the key vocabulary students need to engage in this content?

      • What are skills necessary to engage in this standard?

      • What skills and content were taught in the previous grade or class?

      • How do we know the students learned it?

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Smart goals are

SMART Goals Are….

  • Strategic and Specific

    • Focus on the vital few

  • Measurable

    • Both formative and summative

  • Attainable

    • Goals that motivate us to strive higher

  • Results-Based

    • Concrete benchmarks

  • Time-Bound

    • Builds internal accountability and commitment

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Work smarter not harder

Work SMARTER, Not Harder

  • Read pages 1-3.

  • Highlight key phrases about SMART goal characteristics.

  • With your group, write a definition using those phrases.

    • Record your definition

    • Be prepared to share with the group

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Why goal setting

Why Goal Setting

  • For Students

    • Increases motivation

      • Schmoker, Marzano, Black and Wiliam

    • Increases academic achievement

      • Marzano and Black and Wiliam

  • For Teachers

    • Increases empowerment, efficacy and “joy in work”

      • Conzemius and O’Neill

    • Helps teams maintain their focus on getting results

      • Katzenbach and Smit

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Barriers to goal setting and monitoring

Barriers to Goal-Setting and Monitoring

  • Hard Work

    • Focus on “goal-setting habit of mind” rather than “putting out fires”

  • Lack of Common Assessments

    • Common assessments that are collaboratively developed and scored

  • Lack of Feedback

    • Feedback involves both students and teachers and what we “do” with the information

  • Vulnerability

    • Need clear protocols and norms to dialogue about our practice and the results we find

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My goal

My Goal

  • I will be able to bench press up to 100 pounds for 10 reps by July 2011.

  • Is it???

    • Specific?

    • Measurable?

    • Attainable?

    • Results Based?

    • Time Bound?

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Smart goal format

SMART Goal Format

  • I will be able to bench press up to 100 pounds for 10 reps by December 2011.

    • I will bench press up to 75 pounds for 10 reps by September 2011.

      • Ongoing assessment – I will keep a chart of my reps and make adjustments as necessary

        • Strategies: Bench press 3 sets of increasing weight 2-3 times per week, do other bicep and tricep exercises 2-3 times per week, read about or ask trainer for additional instruction on correct lifting procedures if progress is not made

        • Make a new short term SMART goal in February based on progress

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Your turn

Your Turn

  • Develop a SMART goal for a personal goal you have:

    • Make it SMART: Strategic and Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Results-Based, and Time-Bound

    • What do you want to be able to do? (What do you want your students to learn?)

    • How will you measure progress toward goal? (How will you know they have learned it?)

    • What strategies will you use to attain your goal? What will you do if you are not getting there or getting there faster than you thought? (What will we do if they do or don’t learn?)

    • Share your goal with your “person number 2” from the “Walk Around Survey”

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Smart goals and the four questions

SMART Goals and the Four Questions

  • Write a SMART goal

  • Define the learning targets (What do we expect the students to learn?)

  • Plan some strategies (And how?)

  • Develop classroom and/or common formative assessments you will use to measure your student’s learning and adjust your teaching (How will we know they have learned it?)

  • Analyze the data and design interventions and accelerations (What will we do if they don’t and when they do?)

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Smart goals and the four questions1

SMART Goals and the Four Questions

What will we do if

they don’t?

What will we do if they

already have?

How will we know they have learned it?

What do we

expect our students to learn?

How will they learn it?

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Smart goal resources

SMART Goal Resources

  • Conzemius, A., & O’Neill, J. (2002). The handbook for SMART school teams. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree Press.

  • DuFour, R., DuFour, R., Eaker, R., & Many, T. (2010). Learning by doing: A handbook for professional learning communities at work. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree Press.

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From standards to learning targets

From Standards to Learning Targets

Standards:

  • What we want students to know and be able to do at the end of any given time frame.

  • Provided by the State of Minnesota.

  • Confounding language.

  • Tied to summative assessment.

Learning Targets:

  • Statements of identified learning based on the standards/benchmarks.

  • Focus on the lesson of the day.

  • Kid friendly language.

  • Tied to formative assessment.

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Learning targets

Learning Targets

What is it that you really want students to show that they know, understand and can do?

Measured by a variety of formative assessment methods

Written with clear action verbs

The student will …I can……..

Focused on specific daily concepts and skills

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Example learning targets

Example Learning Targets

Grade 5 Mathematics:

  • I can accurately multiply.

  • I can use words to explain my process and solution.

  • Students will demonstrate multiple ways of representing a solution.

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Why learning targets

Why learning targets?

  • At your tables you will read “Knowing Your Learning Target” by C. Moss, S. Brookhart, & B. Long.

  • As you read, highlight a WORD, a PHRASE, and a SENTENCE that stands out for you.

  • As a group talk about what you chose and how it relates to the question above.

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For more on learning targets

For More on Learning Targets

  • Stiggins, R.J., Arter, J. A., Chappuis, J. & Chappuis, S. (2006). Classroom assessment for student learning: Doing it right- using it well. Portland, OR- ETS Assessment Training Institute.

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Action planning

Action Planning

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Identifying and implementing research based strategies

Identifying and Implementing Research Based Strategies

Where does the team look:

  • Find the “Evidence of Practice in Action” worksheet in your notebook:

    • List school and district initiatives:

    • What initiatives are we implementing?

    • What is working well? How do we know?

    • What other classroom practices are teachers using?

    • What is working? How do they know?

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Plcs for leadership teams semlac day two

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Engaging students in goal setting and feedback

Engaging Students in Goal-Setting and Feedback

Helps students become more reflective on their learning and provide feedback to teacher

Helps students keep a record of their own progress

Helps students understands how to improve their work and feel successful


Three guiding questions for student engagement

Three Guiding Questions For Student Engagement:

  • Where am I going?

    • Share the target

    • Engage students in understanding the target, knowing the expectations, setting a goal.

  • Where am I now?

  • How do I close the gap? (How do I get there?)

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Team self assessment self assessment for a focus on learning

Team Self-Assessment:Self-Assessment for a Focus on Learning

  • Review sections A and B.

  • As a team determine your school’s level of implementation.

  • Discuss and record specific examples or criteria to support your rating.

  • Use these criteria and the information we have shared to develop and record your next action plan steps.

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Action planning1

Action Planning

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Action planning2

Action Planning

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Mapping your route

Mapping Your Route

  • As a team, use the consensus process to come to a consensus on a travel destination.

  • Begin to create a map that will show your journey through the Four Questions.

  • Plot the points you will hit along the way…based on question one and team formation.

    • What will be your teams focus and structures?

    • Where will your teams start in defining learning expectations (priority standards, learning targets)?

    • How will your teams talk about strategies and engage student learning?

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Plcs for leadership teams semlac day two

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What one team says janel keating solution tree

What one team says…Janel Keating/Solution Tree

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The four questions how will we know when they have learned it

The Four Questions:How Will We Know When They Have Learned It?

Collaborative TeamsData/Assessment

Student Learning

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Defining assessment and data

Defining Assessment and Data

  • Read the article, “Looking Deeper Into the Data”.

  • With your school teams in mind, take a few minutes to complete the “Data-Literacy Survey”.

  • Team discussion:

    • How does this change our picture of “data”?

    • What are the strengths and opportunities for growth ?

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Pre assessment

Pre-Assessment

  • Complete the Pre-Assessment – “Determining Where I am now: Assessment for Learning and Assessment Quality Checklist”

  • Circle words or phrases that are new to you, you are wondering about or you have a question about

  • In your table group, share the words you have circled – did you circle common words?

  • Save your pre-assessment for later


Formative vs summative assessment what are the key differences

Formative vs Summative Assessment:What are the key differences?

  • Watch the video: “Assessment OF/FOR Learning: A Hopeful Vision of the Future.”

  • Use the “graphic organizer” to note the key differences.

  • Compare your list with your neighbors and add to your graphic organizer.

  • Compare your observations with Table 2.2, “Comparing Assessment for and of Learning: Overview of Key Differences.” (page 33).

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Create a definition

Create a Definition

  • Write a team definition of formative and summative assessment

    • Use key words from the pre-assessment

    • Consider some of the key differences

  • Record your definition on chart tablet

  • As a team, do a “gallery walk”, use post-it notes to record observations:

    • I wonder…

    • I like the way you….

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Formative assessment

Formative Assessment

  • Formative assessment is about diagnosing student needs, planning the next steps of instruction, and providing students with the necessary feedback to help facilitate improvement.

    • Stiggins, et. al, 2004

  • Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they are doing.

    • Popham, 2008

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    Assessment for learning

    Assessment for Learning

    • Happens while learning is still underway

      • Diagnose student needs

      • Plan next steps in instruction

      • Provide student with feedback to improve the quality of their work

      • The grading function is laid aside

        • Stiggins, et. al., 2004

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    Types of formative assessment

    Types of Formative Assessment

    Common Assessment

    Daily Classroom Assessment

    Daily checks for understanding

    Class work

    Quick check-ins: thumbs up-thumbs down, white boards, red, yellow, green cards, agree-disagree

    Exit cards

    Interviews

    Anecdotal records

    • Commonly written, scored and analyzed by a team of teachers

      • Written Tests

      • Projects

      • Writing Assignments

      • Rubrics

      • Performances

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    Summative assessment

    Summative Assessment

    • Summative assessment occurs when teachers evaluate a final product. They serve as assessments of learning, because their purpose is to support the assignment of final grades or levels or proficiency related to course outcomes or state standards.

      • Burke, 2010

  • Stand-alone final assessments used to measure students’ understanding of units in a textbook or to determine whether students have met the standards or learning objectives during a grading period or course of study.

    • Ainsworth and Viegut, 2006

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    Assessment of learning

    Assessment of Learning

    • Assessment that happens after learning

      • To determine if it did

      • Make statements of a student learning status at a point in time

        • state assessments, college admission tests, final exams, important projects

      • Can be used as evidence to determine a grade

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    Assessment phrases

    Assessment Phrases

    Assessment for Learning (Formative)

    Assessment of Learning (Summative)

    Product driven

    Last efforts

    Results based

    Outcome based

    Last Judgment

    End of course

    Final Grade

    Burke, 2010

    • Process driven

    • Practice

    • Feedback

    • Work in progress

    • Do-overs

    • Beginning of course

    • Not graded

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    Balanced assessment

    Balanced Assessment

    • Use both assessments for learning (formative) and assessments of learning (summative)

      • “Although they are different, both assessments of and for learning are important”

        • Stiggins, et. al., 2004

  • “While they are not interchangeable, they must be compatible”

    • NEA, 2003

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    What about the other data

    What about the other data?

    • Choose student work samples or anecdotal data that demonstrate evidence of progression toward the learning target.

    • Using “Student Work Protocols” share examples of student work.

    • Use data review steps to identify students not yet proficient, proficient, and needing acceleration to determine interventions and accelerations.

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    Learning assessing flow chart

    Learning-Assessing Flow Chart

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    Team self assessment self assessment for a focus on learning1

    Team Self-Assessment:Self-Assessment for a Focus on Learning

    • Review sections C, D, and E

    • As a team determine your school’s level of implementation.

    • Discuss and record specific examples or criteria to support your rating.

    • Use these criteria and the information we have shared to develop and record your next action plan steps.

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    Three guiding questions for student engagement1

    Three Guiding Questions For Student Engagement:

    • Where am I going?

    • Where am I now?

    • PLC Question: How will we know they have learned it.

      • Students use teacher, peer and personal feedback from formative assessment to assess their progress toward the goal.

    • How do I close the gap? (How do I get there?)

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    Action planning3

    Action Planning

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    Mapping your route1

    Mapping Your Route

    • Continue to map out your journey through the Four Questions.

    • Plot the points you will hit along the way…based on question two and assessment:

      • How will our team use formative and summative assessment?

      • How will our team analyze data?

      • What tools will our team use to analyze data?

      • What will our team do to learn more about assessment and data analysis?

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    The four questions what will we do if they don t learn

    The Four Questions:What will we do if they don’t learn?

    Collaborative TeamsData/Assessment

    Student Learning

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    Linking data to inform instruction

    Linking Data to Inform Instruction

    Identified Learning Target

    Data Analysis

    Best Practice/Intervention/Strategy

    Differentiate for “all” learners using data from assessments based on learning target.


    A five step data process for analyzing assessments

    A Five Step Data ProcessFor Analyzing Assessments

    1. Data Analysis

    2. Graphic Representation

    3. Record Observations

    4. Write Hypothesis of Practice (HOP)

    5. Write Goal


    Mining the data

    Mining the Data

    • Step One: Record the data on a spreadsheet or form of your choice.

    • Step Two: Make graphic representation that Identify students who are in the “Needs Attention”, “Proficiency” and “Needs Challenge” groups

      • Create a list or table that represents your student results

    • Step Three: List observations from the data

      • What do we observe from the data?

      • Who are the students in each group?

    • Step Four: Develop Hypotheses of Practice (HOPS)

      • What might be happening to achieve these results?

      • Must be “we” statements about what can be altered

    • Step Five: Develop appropriate goals and instructional modifications (short term and long term) to complete Instructional Strategy Action Plan


    Identify students

    Identify students

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    Evaluate the assessment

    Evaluate the Assessment

    • Did our assessment adequately measure our learning targets?

    • Are there some targets that have a large number of students not proficient?

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    Designing informed instruction

    Designing Informed Instruction


    Informed instruction reflection sheet

    Informed Instruction Reflection Sheet


    Three guiding questions for student engagement2

    Three Guiding Questions For Student Engagement:

    • Where am I going?

    • Where am I now?

    • How do I close the gap? (How do I get there?)

      • With specific feedback, students determine strategies that will help them reach their goal – request for additional help, homework options, set goals for new learning.

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    Action planning4

    Action Planning

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    Road map

    Road Map

    • You are about to reach your travel destination.

    • Share a site you’d like to visit or an activity you’d like to engage in.

    • Complete your map with plans for questions 3 and 4.

    • Plot the points you will hit along the way…

      • How will your teams identify and address students needing interventions or accelerations?

      • What intervention and accelerations structures will you add to or create?

      • How will you celebrate your accomplishments along the way?

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    Implementation map sharing

    Implementation Map Sharing

    • As a collaborative team, share your team’s journey:

      • Highlights from each stop.

      • Things you learned along the way.

      • What you are most excited to implement.

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    Action planning5

    Action Planning

    • Compile your action plans and road map!

    • Using the action planning sheets, you have prepared, continue to develop your calendar of implementation and action steps.

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    References and resources

    References and Resources

    Chadwick, R. (2000). Colorado Educators Consensus Institute: Beyond conflict to consensus. Terebonne, OR: Consensus Associates.

    DuFour, R., DuFour, R., Eaker, R., & Many, T. (2006). Learning by doing: A Handbook for professional learning communities at work. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree Press.

    Ferriter, W.M. and Graham, P. (2010). Building a professional learning community at work: A guide to the first year. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree Press.

    Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. New York, NY: Routledge.

    Love, N. (2009). Using data to improve learning for all: A collaborative inquiry approach. CA: Corwin Press.

    Marzano, R. (2003). What works in schools: Translating research into action. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

    Muhammad, A. (2009). Transforming school culture: How to overcome staff division. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree Press.

    Reeves, D (editor, 2007). Ahead of the curve: The power of assessment to transform teaching and learning. Bloomington: IN: Solution Tree Press.

    Stiggins, R.J., Arter, J.A., Chappuis, J. & Chappuis, S. (2006). Classroom assessment for student learning: Doing it right-using it well. Portland, OR: ETS.

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    Contact information

    Contact Information

    Linda Harvieux

    Metro ECSU

    • 612-638-1548

    • [email protected]

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