slide1
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Whose course is it anyway?- giving first year students a voice in curriculum design

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 11

Whose course is it anyway?- giving first year students a voice in curriculum design - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 70 Views
  • Uploaded on

Whose course is it anyway?- giving first year students a voice in curriculum design Amanda Corrigan School of Education. Me as a Learner. compulsory 20 credits development of undergraduate competences supports transition to university for all students promotes personal development and PDP

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Whose course is it anyway?- giving first year students a voice in curriculum design' - primo


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1
Whose course is it anyway?- giving first year students a voice in curriculum design

Amanda Corrigan

School of Education

me as a learner
Me as a Learner
  • compulsory
  • 20 credits
  • development of undergraduate competences
  • supports transition to university for all students
  • promotes personal development and PDP
  • MaaL tutor acts as personal development adviser
me as a learner1
Me as a Learner

Personal Development Planning

involving students in curriculum design
Involving students in curriculum design
  • Student representatives given greater responsibility – bringing ideas from their class and attending a student focus group
  • Focus groups included 2nd year students in the role of consultants
  • Decisions made at the focus group about content and delivery of 3 tutorials plus an idea proposed for development in a lecture
  • Student decisions shared with staff with guidelines about how content could be delivered
  • Tutors used a responsive planning approach in tutorials
  • Wider student body evaluated the process
key themes chosen by students
Key themes chosen by students

Time management/organisation*

Communication and presentation skills

Working as part of a team

Peer assessment*

Professionalism*

did you use skills from this part of the module in school
Did you use skills from this part of the module in school?

97 of 109 respondents (89% of those responding) had used skills covered in this part of the module during their school placement. 5 respondents (5% of those responding) did not make use of skills covered in this part of the module. 7 participants (6%) had not responded to this question.

how effective were your skills in the situations in which you used them
How effective were your skills in the situations in which you used them?

“ Did not seem daunting, I had done this in MaaL.”

“ Very good teaching in MaaL helped this.”

“ The skills I have are mainly from previous experience but MaaL

taught me more about myself as a learner.”

“ My skills were more effective due to the practice in the tutorial.”

issues to consider
Issues to consider
  • How representative were the student reps?
  • Did making decisions at the focus group give adequate time for reflection?
  • Was the success of the project related to the nature of the discipline and the professional placement?
  • How can students’ previous experience be considered more seriously?
consider the following
Consider the following...

Students cannot develop graduate attributes without first having a

robust set of undergraduate competences that are refined and

honed over the course of their degree programme.

references
References

Campbell, F., Beasley, L., Eland, J. and Rumpus, A. (2007) Hearing the Student Voice – promoting

and encouraging the effective use of the student voice to enhance professional development in

learning, teaching and assessment. Edinburgh: Napier University.

Campbell, F., L., Eland, J., Rumpus, A.and Shacklock, R.(2009) Hearing the Student Voice

involving students in curriculum and delivery. Final report. Edinburgh: Napier University.

Eland, J. (2010, April 20). Hearing the Student Voice.Powerpoint presentation, Higher Education

Academy Seminar, London.  Retrieved June 20, 2010 from

http://www2.napier.ac.uk/studentvoices/curriculum/download/SVLondonApril10.pptx

Lines, D. (2005). The first-year learning experience. In The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher

Education, Responding to Student Needs: Student evaluation and feedback toolkit. Gloucester: The

Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education.

Morrison, K.A. (2009). Making Teacher Education More Democratic: Incorporating Student Voice

and Choice, Part Two. Educational Horizons. 87:2, 102-115. Winter 2009.

ad