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X - . _. z = . -.  X. Wow! We can use the z-distribution to test a hypothesis. Step 1. State the statistical hypothesis H 0 to be tested (e.g., H 0 :  = 100) Step 2. Specify the degree of risk of a type-I error, that is, the risk of incorrectly concluding

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

X - 

_

z =

-

X

Wow! We can use the z-distribution to test a hypothesis.

slide2

Step 1. State the statistical hypothesis H0 to be tested (e.g., H0:  = 100)

Step 2. Specify the degree of risk of a type-I error, that is, the risk of incorrectly concluding

that H0 is false when it is true. This risk, stated as a probability, is denoted by , the probability

of a Type I error.

Step 3. Assuming H0 to be correct, find the probability of obtaining a sample mean that

differs from  by an amount as large or larger than what was observed.

Step 4. Make a decision regarding H0, whether to reject or not to reject it.

slide3

Step 1.What would it look like if this is random?

Step 2. Specify the degree of risk of a type-I error, that is, the risk of incorrectly concluding

that H0 is false when it is true. This risk, stated as a probability, is denoted by , the probability

of a Type I error.

Step 3. Assuming H0 to be correct, find the probability of obtaining a sample mean that

differs from  by an amount as large or larger than what was observed.

Step 4. Make a decision regarding H0, whether to reject or not to reject it.

slide4

Step 1.What would it look like if this is random?

Step 2.If the reality is that it is indeed random, what risk can I live with

to wrongly conclude that it’s not random?

Step 3. Assuming H0 to be correct, find the probability of obtaining a sample mean that

differs from  by an amount as large or larger than what was observed.

Step 4. Make a decision regarding H0, whether to reject or not to reject it.

slide5

Step 1.What would it look like if this is random?

Step 2.If the reality is that it is indeed random, what risk can I live with

to wrongly conclude that it’s not random?

Step 3.What’s the exact value beyond which I can conclude, under that condition of risk,

that it’s not random?

Step 4.Make a decision regarding H0, whether to reject or not to reject it.

slide6

Step 1.What would it look like if this is random?

Step 2.If the reality is that it is indeed random, what risk can I live with

to wrongly conclude that it’s not random?

Step 3.What’s the exact value beyond which I can conclude, under that condition of risk,

that it’s not random?

Step 4.Make a decision regarding whether it’s not random (reject), or random (accept).

slide7

An Example

You draw a sample of 25 adopted children. You are interested in whether they

are different from the general population on an IQ test ( = 100,  = 15).

The mean from your sample is 108. What is the null hypothesis?

slide8

An Example

You draw a sample of 25 adopted children. You are interested in whether they

are different from the general population on an IQ test ( = 100,  = 15).

The mean from your sample is 108. What is the null hypothesis?

H0:  = 100

slide9

An Example

You draw a sample of 25 adopted children. You are interested in whether they

are different from the general population on an IQ test ( = 100,  = 15).

The mean from your sample is 108. What is the null hypothesis?

H0:  = 100

Test this hypothesis at  = .05

slide10

An Example

You draw a sample of 25 adopted children. You are interested in whether they

are different from the general population on an IQ test ( = 100,  = 15).

The mean from your sample is 108. What is the null hypothesis?

H0:  = 100

Test this hypothesis at  = .05

Step 3. Assuming H0 to be correct, find the sample mean value that

differs from  by an amount as large or larger than what might be observed by chance.

Step 4. Make a decision regarding H0, whether to reject or not to reject it.

slide15

The t-distribution is a family of distributions varying by degrees of freedom (d.f., where

d.f.=n-1). At d.f. =, but at smaller than that, the tails are fatter.

slide16

X - 

X - 

_

_

z =

t =

-

-

X

sX

s

-

sX =

 N

slide17

The t-distribution is a family of distributions varying by degrees of freedom (d.f., where

d.f.=n-1). At d.f. =, but at smaller than that, the tails are fatter.

slide20

Problem

Sample:

Mean = 54.2

SD = 2.4

N = 16

Do you think that this sample could have been drawn from a population with  = 50?

slide21

X - 

t =

-

sX

Problem

Sample:

Mean = 54.2

SD = 2.4

N = 16

Do you think that this sample could have been drawn from a population with  = 50?

_

slide22

The mean for the sample of 54.2 (sd = 2.4) was significantly different from a hypothesized population mean of 50, t(15) = 7.0, p < .001.

slide23

The mean for the sample of 54.2 (sd = 2.4) was significantly reliably different from a hypothesized population mean of 50, t(15) = 7.0, p < .001.

slide24

SampleC

SampleD

rXY

Population

rXY

SampleB

XY

rXY

SampleE

SampleA

_

rXY

rXY

slide25

r N - 2

t =

1 - r2

The t distribution, at N-2 degrees of freedom, can be used to test the probability that the statistic r was drawn from a population with  = 0. Table C.

H0 :  XY = 0

H1 :  XY  0

where

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