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Project Design and Management II Pegasus II (Measurement and Increment of the Efficiency of Pegasus Lawnmower Engine) Robert Crumrine Ben Knerr Rijesh Pradhan. Introduction. Our project is to construct a Biomass gasifier unit, or a wood gas generator, to substitute gasoline as fuel.

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Project Design and Management IIPegasus II(Measurement and Increment of the Efficiency of Pegasus Lawnmower Engine)Robert CrumrineBen KnerrRijeshPradhan

introduction
Introduction
  • Our project is to construct a Biomass gasifier unit, or a wood gas generator, to substitute gasoline as fuel.
  • Biomass gasifiersare excellent because the fuel can be abundant and easy to convert.
  • The structure needs a burner and pipes that can withstand high temperatures.
how it works
How it works
  • The Burner uses a process called gasification.
  • Optimum temperature is 1000 degrees Celsius.
  • Products of the starved fuel becomes carbon monoxide, hydrogen, methane, tar and dust.
  • Carbon monoxide and hydrogen make up the combustible gas that feeds the engine.

Figure 2 – Gasifier without casing and shaker.

design
Design
  • Main body
  •     Gas generator
  • Filter Assembly
  • Heat Exchanger
  • Blower
  • Nozzle
  •     Pipes

Rear view of the gasifier unit

test 1
Test 1
  • March 9th 2011

Initial Observations

  • Temperature not high enough ( fluctuating between 200C - 300C)
  • Smoke coming out of the inlet ports.
  • Blower placed too far to provide efficient suction.
  • Output air not combustible.
  • Fire location was located to close to inlet ports.
conclusions after test 1
Conclusions after test 1
  • System doesn’t have sufficient air flow.
  • Blower placement directly affects maximum temperature.
  • Thicker wood chunks caused uneven heat distribution.
  • Filter and heat exchanger actually obstruct the airflow to the blower.
  • Transfer tubes are partially clogged with combustion debris.
modifications
Modifications
  • Installed insulation
  • Cleaned pipes
  • Replaced wood
  • Added gasket
test 2
Test 2
  • April 2nd 2011

Initial Observations

  • Optimum temperature was reached.
  • Gas flow changed based on blower location.
  • Smoke did not flow out of inlet ports.
  • Outflow was saturated with water.
  • Fire location was located to close to inlet ports.
analysis
Analysis
  • Insulation improved combustion temperature.
  • Outlet gases were incombustible.
  • Flame is positioned too close to inlet ports.
  • Heat exchanger is reducing gas flow and not necessary.

Air inlet ports

optimization
Optimization
  • The heat exchanger needs to be removed.
  • Air inlet needs to be modified.
  • Add protective paste to the insulation.
  • A component is needed to remove water vapor.
optimization1
optimization
  • Next major modification is to remove water vapor from the output air mixture.
conclusion
Conclusion
  • Pegasus was tested.
  • Efficiency was improved.
  • Evaluated problems.
  • Clearly outlined future goals.
  • Key milestone of combustion temperature achieved.
slide13

Final Budget

  • Temperature probe and meter $670
  • Insulation $63 + s/h
  • Initial budget provided $500

Proposed budget

  • Insulation paste ~$100
  • Pipes ~$5
  • Installation Labor ~$100
  • Water Separator $125
references
References
  • 1. La Fontaine, Harry; Zimmerman, F.P. Construction of a Simplified Wood Gas Generator for Fueling Internal Combustion Engines in a Petroleum Emergency. 2nd ed. Golden, CO: The Biomass Energy Foundation Press. (1)
  • 2. Papworth , and Skov. Driving on Wood. The Biomass Energy Foundation Press, 2006.
  • 3. Das. “The Up-Downdraft Gasifier.” Woodgas. Web.

http://www.woodgas.com/history9.htm

  • 4.Vinod. Volvo 240 Converted to run on Wood Gas. Automotto, 29 July 2010. Web.

http://www.automotto.org/entry/duch-john-converts-his-volvo-240-to-run-on-wood-gas

  • 5.Lynch, Eric. Biomass Gasification. What is it? Can it be used now?.

Surfers without borders, 21 Jan. 2006.

http://www.surferswithoutborders.org/Resources_files/Biomass%20Gasification%20Presentation.pdf

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