Project Design and Management II
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Project Design and Management II Pegasus II (Measurement and Increment of the Efficiency of Pegasus Lawnmower Engine) Robert Crumrine Ben Knerr Rijesh Pradhan. Introduction. Our project is to construct a Biomass gasifier unit, or a wood gas generator, to substitute gasoline as fuel.

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Introduction 2749970

Project Design and Management IIPegasus II(Measurement and Increment of the Efficiency of Pegasus Lawnmower Engine)Robert CrumrineBen KnerrRijeshPradhan


Introduction

Introduction

  • Our project is to construct a Biomass gasifier unit, or a wood gas generator, to substitute gasoline as fuel.

  • Biomass gasifiersare excellent because the fuel can be abundant and easy to convert.

  • The structure needs a burner and pipes that can withstand high temperatures.


How it works

How it works

  • The Burner uses a process called gasification.

  • Optimum temperature is 1000 degrees Celsius.

  • Products of the starved fuel becomes carbon monoxide, hydrogen, methane, tar and dust.

  • Carbon monoxide and hydrogen make up the combustible gas that feeds the engine.

Figure 2 – Gasifier without casing and shaker.


Design

Design

  • Main body

  •     Gas generator

  • Filter Assembly

  • Heat Exchanger

  • Blower

  • Nozzle

  •     Pipes

Rear view of the gasifier unit


Test 1

Test 1

  • March 9th 2011

    Initial Observations

  • Temperature not high enough ( fluctuating between 200C - 300C)

  • Smoke coming out of the inlet ports.

  • Blower placed too far to provide efficient suction.

  • Output air not combustible.

  • Fire location was located to close to inlet ports.


Conclusions after test 1

Conclusions after test 1

  • System doesn’t have sufficient air flow.

  • Blower placement directly affects maximum temperature.

  • Thicker wood chunks caused uneven heat distribution.

  • Filter and heat exchanger actually obstruct the airflow to the blower.

  • Transfer tubes are partially clogged with combustion debris.


Modifications

Modifications

  • Installed insulation

  • Cleaned pipes

  • Replaced wood

  • Added gasket


Test 2

Test 2

  • April 2nd 2011

    Initial Observations

  • Optimum temperature was reached.

  • Gas flow changed based on blower location.

  • Smoke did not flow out of inlet ports.

  • Outflow was saturated with water.

  • Fire location was located to close to inlet ports.


Analysis

Analysis

  • Insulation improved combustion temperature.

  • Outlet gases were incombustible.

  • Flame is positioned too close to inlet ports.

  • Heat exchanger is reducing gas flow and not necessary.

Air inlet ports


Optimization

Optimization

  • The heat exchanger needs to be removed.

  • Air inlet needs to be modified.

  • Add protective paste to the insulation.

  • A component is needed to remove water vapor.


Optimization1

optimization

  • Next major modification is to remove water vapor from the output air mixture.


Conclusion

Conclusion

  • Pegasus was tested.

  • Efficiency was improved.

  • Evaluated problems.

  • Clearly outlined future goals.

  • Key milestone of combustion temperature achieved.


Introduction 2749970

Final Budget

  • Temperature probe and meter $670

  • Insulation $63 + s/h

  • Initial budget provided $500

    Proposed budget

  • Insulation paste ~$100

  • Pipes ~$5

  • Installation Labor ~$100

  • Water Separator $125


Appendix a ghantt chart

Appendix A: Ghantt Chart


References

References

  • 1. La Fontaine, Harry; Zimmerman, F.P. Construction of a Simplified Wood Gas Generator for Fueling Internal Combustion Engines in a Petroleum Emergency. 2nd ed. Golden, CO: The Biomass Energy Foundation Press. (1)

  • 2. Papworth , and Skov. Driving on Wood. The Biomass Energy Foundation Press, 2006.

  • 3. Das. “The Up-Downdraft Gasifier.” Woodgas. Web.

    http://www.woodgas.com/history9.htm

  • 4.Vinod. Volvo 240 Converted to run on Wood Gas. Automotto, 29 July 2010. Web.

    http://www.automotto.org/entry/duch-john-converts-his-volvo-240-to-run-on-wood-gas

  • 5.Lynch, Eric. Biomass Gasification. What is it? Can it be used now?.

    Surfers without borders, 21 Jan. 2006.

    http://www.surferswithoutborders.org/Resources_files/Biomass%20Gasification%20Presentation.pdf


Questions

Questions???????


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