Multibandgap quantum well wafers
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Multibandgap quantum well wafers by IR laser quantum well intermixing: simulation of the lateral resolution of the process. O. Voznyy , R. Stanowski, J.J. Dubowski Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Research Center for Nanofabrication and Nanocharacterization

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O. Voznyy , R. Stanowski, J.J. Dubowski Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

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O voznyy r stanowski j j dubowski department of electrical and computer engineering

Multibandgap quantum well wafers by IR laser quantum well intermixing: simulation of the lateral resolution of the process

O. Voznyy, R. Stanowski, J.J. Dubowski

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Research Center for Nanofabrication and Nanocharacterization

Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec J1K 2R1

Canada


Outline

Outline

  • Motivation

  • Modeling heat distribution and photoluminescence (PL) in QW wafers

  • Temperature profiles induced in InGaAs/InGaAsP wafers by moving laser beam

  • PL shift profiles

    5.Summary


Quantum well intermixing

Motivation >

E0 E1 E2 E3

Quantum well intermixing

Multibandgap materials are needed for creation of photonic integrated circuits (lasers, modulators, waveguides, multi-color detectors etc. fabricated on same wafer)

Quantum well intermixing (QWI) – interdiffusion of wells and barriers resulting in the change of the well width, potential barrier height and energy of confined states.


Current state of the problem

Motivation >

Current state of the problem

Simulations [1] predict transition region ~300μmusing CW Nd:YAG laser irradiation (photoabsorbtion induced disordering) with a shadow mask[1]. Also, pulsed laser IR disordering(2-step process) has been proposed (~2μm transtion region possible[2]).

Our aim is to investigate Laser-RTA (annealing with a moving CW laser beam) as a flexible (1-step process) and potentially cost-effective technique.

[1] A. McKee, et. al., IEEE J. Quantum Electron., vol. 33, pp. 45–55, Jan. 1997.

[2] B.S.Ooi,et. al. IEEE J. Quantum Electron., vol. 40, pp.481–490, May 2004


Moving laser beam

Motivation >

Moving laser beam

In previous work [3] array of 12 lines of intermixed GaAs/AlGaAs QW material was successfully written with 5cm/s, 0.7mm CW Nd:YAG laser beam in a

14 mm x6 mm sample.

This approach has the potential to write complex patterns of intermixed material.

[3] J.J. Dubowski, et. al., Proc. SPIE, 5339, (2004).

Quantum well PL peak position

measured across the sample

irradiated with a fast scanning laser beam

that was used to generate a 12-line pattern.


Finite element method simulations

Computation details >

Finite Element Method simulations

To find heat distribution in a wafer we used FEMLAB commercial software.

Geometry is divided into small mesh elements with their own PDE parameters. Then the resulting system of PDEs is solved.

Heat transfer PDE:

Subdomain equation: Q - (kT)= Cp(T/t)

Boundary equation:kT=q0 + h(Tinf – T) + εσ(Tamb4 – T4)

For correct results temperature dependent thermal conductivity k and optical absorption α should be taken into account.


Finding plshift d

Computation details >

Finding PLshift(D)

  • Take diffusion coefficient as parameter

  • Find concentration profile for given D and time

  • Find energy profiles for electrons and holes (take into account bandgaps, band offsets, bandgap bowing)

  • Solve Schrödinger equation, find energy levels and PL

  • Approximate results as some function D(PL shift)

If T(t)=const (like with RTA):

LD = – diffusion length.

Otherwise one needs to solve numerically

D assumed to be the same for different atomic species.


Finding d t and plshift t t

Computation details >

Finding D(T) and PLshift(T, t)

Compare simulations and experimental PLshift(Tanneal) data for the same annealing time, find D(Tanneal)

Build Arrhenius plot lnD(1/kT) and find parameters for

D=D0exp(-EA/kT)

Now we can find PL shift

for any T and time.


Laser p ower density and surface damage

Computation details >

Laser power density and surface damage

To achieve T needed for intermixing, different power needed for different beam diameters.

For small diameters <0.5mm power densities become higher than surface damage threshold (>30W/mm2).

Needed power density can be reduced using background heating.

270 W/mm2

700 W/mm2

1500 W/mm2


Power density for moving beam

Computation details >

Power density for moving beam

With laser fast scanning (Laser-RTA) we can heat samples to same temperatures, with smaller beam diameters and avoid surface damage.

Power needed to heat the wafer to TQWI increases a little,but fluence drops down significantly (shorter dwell time).

TQWI

TQWI


Depth dependence

Computation details >

d=100μm

Depth, μm

100

50

0

0 50 100 Lateral, μm

d=12μm

Depth, μm

100

50

0

0 50 100 Lateral, μm

Depth dependence

For small beam diameters T drops down with depth very fast.

InP is transparent to Nd:YAG wavelength at RT, but

Eg(InP)=1.165eV at 500°C, andα=104-106cm-1 at higherT.

Thus, all the energy is absorbed on the surface and goes inside only by heat conduction.


Scanning speed and bg heating

Temperature profiles >

Scanning speed and bg heating

  • For small samples slower speed results in raise of background temperature.

  • For big wafers heat dissipates faster and temperature profiles don’t depend on scanning speed (laser power is adjusted to achieve same Tsurface).

  • Background heating helps to achieve wanted T.


Temporal t behavior during scan

PL shift profiles >

Temporal T behavior during scan

  • To calculate PL shift profile for moving beam we need:

  • calculate concentration and energy profiles using given T(t) and D(T) at different distances from line center,

  • solve Schrödinger equation and find PL shift.


Pl shift profile for moving beam

PL shift profiles >

PL shift profile for moving beam

Due to varying T(t), PL shift profile for moving beam differs from that of stationary beam, although temperature profiles are the same.

PL shift profile shape doesn’t depend on Tmax.

Higher temperatures reduce processing time significantly.


O voznyy r stanowski j j dubowski department of electrical and computer engineering

PL shift resolution and processing time

  • Processing time for 100nm PL shift along one 2-inch line assuming Tmax=1073K (which requires 90s to get the same PL shift with RTA).

  • Practical applications will require shifts < 50nm.


Summary

Summary

  • Irradiation with the moving CW Nd:YAG laser been has been investigated for selective area writing of the QWI material.

  • For large size wafers (2 inch) temperature profiles don’t depend on scanning speed (assuming that beam power is adjusted to achieve the same Tmax).

  • Processing time to achieve targeted PL (badgap) shifts depends on beam diameter and Tmax.

  • To achieve reasonable processing time without loss in resolution

    a) QWs should be very close to surface,

    b) Tmax should be as high as allowed by material decomposition temperature

  • Background heating can be used to further decrease processing time (especially for deep QWs) but decreasing also resolution.

  • Lateral PL shift resolution of 5μm is feasible (InGaAs/InGaAsP QW material system) with the12μm beam Laser-RTA.

    Support

    Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)

    Canada Research Chair (CRC) Program


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