Cutting speed feed and depth of cut
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Cutting Speed, Feed, and Depth of Cut. Unit 60. Factors Affecting the Efficiency of a Milling Operation. Cutting speed Too slow, time wasted Too fast, time lost in replacing/regrinding cutters Feed Too slow, time wasted and cutter chatter Too fast, cutter teeth can be broken Depth of cut

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Cutting Speed, Feed, and Depth of Cut

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Cutting speed feed and depth of cut

Cutting Speed, Feed, and Depth of Cut

Unit 60


Factors affecting the efficiency of a milling operation

Factors Affecting the Efficiency of a Milling Operation

  • Cutting speed

    • Too slow, time wasted

    • Too fast, time lost in replacing/regrinding cutters

  • Feed

    • Too slow, time wasted and cutter chatter

    • Too fast, cutter teeth can be broken

  • Depth of cut

    • Several shallow cuts wastes time


Cutting speed

Cutting Speed

  • Speed, in surface feet per minute (sf/min) or meters per minute (m/min) at which metal may be machined efficiently

  • Work machined in a lathe, speed in specific number of revolutions per min (r/min) depending on its diameter to achieve proper cutting speed

  • In milling machine, cutter revolves r/min depending on diameter for cutting speed


Cutting speed1

Cutting Speed

Excessive Speed will result in increased tool wear

Increasing cutting speed by 50% can result in a decrease of tool-life by 90%


Important factors in determining cutting speed

Important Factors in Determining Cutting Speed

  • Work piece material

  • Cutting Tool material

  • Operation performed

  • Surface finish required

  • Depth of cut taken

  • Rigidity of machine and work setup

The Big Three


Milling machine cutting speeds

Milling Machine Cutting Speeds

High-Speed Steel Carbide

Materialft/min m/minft/minm/min

Alloy steel40–70 12–20150–25045–75

Aluminum500–1000 150–3001000–2000300–600

Bronze65–120 20–35200–40060–120

Cast iron50–80 15–25125–20040–60

Free mach stl100–150 30–45400–600120–180

Machine steel70–100 21–30150–25045–75

Stainless steel30–80 10–25100–30030–90

Tool steel60–70 18–20125–20040–60


Inch calculations

simplify formula

Inch Calculations

  • For optimum use from cutter, proper speed must be determined

  • Diameter of cutter affects this speed

Calculate speed required to revolve a 3-in. diameter

high-speed steel milling cutter for cutting machine

steel (90 sf/min).


Metric calculations

simplify formula

Metric Calculations

Formula for r/min of the milling machine using

metric measurement

Calculate the r/min required for a 75 mm diameter high-speed steel milling cutter when cutting machine steel (CS 30 m/min)


Cutting speed rules for best results

Cutting Speed Rules for Best Results

  • For longer cutter life, use lower CS in recommended range

  • Know hardness of material to be machined

  • When starting, use lower range of CS and gradually increase to higher range

  • Reduce feed instead of increase cutter speed for fine finish

  • Use of coolant will generally produce better finish and lengthen life of cutter


Milling machine feed

Milling Machine Feed

  • Defined as distance in inches (or mm) per minute that work moves into cutter

    • Independent of spindle speed

  • Feed: rate work moves into revolving cutter

    • Measured in in/min or mm/min

  • Milling feed: determined by multiplying chip size (chip per tooth) desired, number of teeth in cutter, and r/min of cutter

  • Chip, or feed, per tooth (CPT or (FPT): amount of material that should be removed by each tooth of the cutter


Milling machine feed1

Milling Machine Feed

Excessive feed can increase tool wear

Increase of feedrate by 50% can result in a 60% decrease in tool-life


Factors in feed rate

Factors in Feed Rate

  • Depth and width of cut

  • Design or type of cutter

  • Sharpness of cutter

  • Workpiece material

  • Strength and uniformity of workpiece

  • Type of finish and accuracy required

  • Power and rigidity of machine, holding device and tooling setup


Recommended feed per tooth high speed cutters

Recommended Feed Per Tooth(High-speed Cutters)

Slotting Face Helicaland Side Mills MillsMills

Material in. mm in.mmin.mm

Alloy steel.006 0.15 .0050.12.0040.1

Aluminum .022 0.55 .0180.45.0130.33

Brass and bronze (medium) .014 0.35 .0110.28.0080.2

Cast iron (medium) .013 0.33 .0100.25.0070.18

Sample Table

See Table 60.2 in Text

Table shows feed per tooth for roughing cuts –for finishing cut, the feed per tooth would bereduced to1/2 or even 1/3 of value shown


Recommended feed per tooth cemented carbide tipped cutters

Recommended Feed Per Tooth(Cemented-Carbide-Tipped Cutters)

Sample Table

See Table 60.3 in Text

Slotting

Face Helicaland Side Mills MillsMills

Material in. mm in.mmin.mm

Aluminum .020 0.5 .0160.40.0120.3

Brass and bronze (medium) .012 0.3 .0100.25.0070.18

Cast iron (medium) .016 0.4 .0130.33.0100.25

Table shows feed per tooth for roughing cuts –for finishing cut, the feed per tooth would bereduced to1/2 or even 1/3 of value shown


Ideal rate of feed

Ideal Rate of Feed

  • Work advances into cutter, each successive tooth advances into work equal amount

    • Produces chips of equal thickness

      • Feed per tooth

Feed = no. of cutter teeth x feed/tooth x cutter r/min

Feed (in./min) = N x CPT x r/min


Examples feed calculations

Examples: Feed Calculations

Inch Calculations

Find the feed in inches per minute using a 3.5 in. diameter, 12 tooth helical cutter to cut machine steel (CS80)

First, calculate proper r/min for cutter:

Feed(in/min) = N x CPT x r/min

=12 x .010 x 91

= 10.9 or 11 in/min


Examples feed calculations1

Examples: Feed Calculations

Metric Calculations

Calculate the feed in millimeters per minutefor a 75-mm diameter, six-tooth helical carbidemilling cutter when machining cast-iron (CS 60)

First, calculate proper r/min for cutter:

Feed(in/min) = N x CPT x r/min

= 6 x .025 x 256

= 384 mm/min


Direction of feed conventional

Direction of Feed: Conventional

  • Most common method is to feed work against rotation direction of cutter


Direction of feed climbing

Direction of Feed: Climbing

  • When cutter andworkpiece goingin same direction

  • Cutting machineequipped withbacklash eliminator

  • Can increase cutterlife up to 50%


Advantages of climb milling

Advantages of Climb Milling

  • Increased tool life (up to 50%)

    • Chips pile up behind or to left of cutter

  • Less costly fixtures required

    • Forces workpiece down so simpler holding devices required

  • Improved surface finishes

    • Chips less likely to be carried into workpiece


Advantages of climb milling1

Advantages of Climb Milling

  • Less edge breakout

    • Thickness of chip tends to get smaller as nears edge of workpiece, less chance of breaking

  • Easier chip removal

    • Chips fall behind cutter

  • Lower power requirements

    • Cutter with higher rake angle can be used so approximately 20% less power required


Disadvantages of climb milling

Disadvantages of Climb Milling

  • Method cannot be used unless machine has backlash eliminator and table gibs tightened

  • Cannot be used for machining castings or hot-rolled steel

    • Hard outer scale will damage cutter


Depth of cut

Depth of Cut

The amount of stock removed with each cut or pass.

Roughing verses Finishing


Depth of cut1

Depth of Cut

  • Roughing cuts should be deep

    • Feed heavy as the work and machine will permit

    • May be taken with helical cutters having fewer teeth

  • Finishing cuts should be light with finer feed

    • Depth of cut at least .015 in.

    • Feed should be reduced rather than cutter speeded up


Depth of cut2

Depth of Cut

Increasing depth of cut by 50% can result in a 15% decrease in tool-life

Given a choice:

Take the deepest depth of cut

Utilize the correct feedrates

Use established cutting speeds


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