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Multidisciplinary Senior Design I. System Design. Agenda. Tuesday End-State Deliverables Functional Analysis Example Team Project Work Concept Generation Morphological Analysis Thursday Concept Generation Develop Alternatives Engineering Analysis Concept Selection.

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agenda
Agenda
  • Tuesday
    • End-State Deliverables
    • Functional Analysis
      • Example
      • Team Project Work
    • Concept Generation
      • Morphological Analysis
  • Thursday
    • Concept Generation
      • Develop Alternatives
    • Engineering Analysis
    • Concept Selection
selected concept
Selected Concept
  • Updates:
    • Electronic controls (decrease size/more options)
    • Smaller pump
    • Reliable and smaller battery
  • Additions:
    • Ability to monitor and record vitals
    • Pulse oximeter feedback
    • Voice alerts/instructions
    • Carbon dioxide sensor
risk assessment
Risk Assessment

There is no shame in this being a large list, especially at this stage.

Demonstrates that you are being realistic.

test plan first cut
Test Plan (First Cut)
  • Test Pump Test
    • Verify Mass Flow Rate
  • Test Mass Flow Sensor
    • Verify Readings Match Pump Test Results
  • Test Pressure Sensor
    • Compare against Flow Characteristics chart of the Pressure sensor.
  • Test User Interface
    • Verify ease of use
considerations
Considerations
  • Physical Decomposition
    • Subsystem Identification
  • Functional Decomposition
  • Specification Decomposition
    • Need to flow-down specifications
what is a function
What is a function?
  • Function – active verb, noun
    • A clear, reproducible relationship between the available input and the desired out of the product, independent of any particular form
    • Examples:
      • Make Copies, Chop Beans, Clip Nails

Product Represented as a Functional System

Energy

Energy

Material

Material

Information

Information

Otto, K., Wood, Kristin L., Product Design: Techniques in Reverse Engineering and New Product Development, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle, NJ 2001, pp. 152 – 151.

what is the function of this
What is the function of this?

Product Represented as a Functional System

Energy

Energy

Material

Material

Information

Information

Energy could be manual, electric, kinetic, potential, etc. depending on solution, so typically only worry about flows that will not change

What is the function?

What flows will not change?

Open Can

Can

Can, Lid, Contents

Sealed Can

Opened Can

subtract and operate bill of materials
Subtract and Operate – Bill of Materials

Generating a Hardware Tree Can

Also be Very Helpful

Source: http://gicl.cs.drexel.edu/wiki/Can_Opener

subtract operate
Subtract & Operate

Added Functions

Protect Opener

Capture Lid

Actuate

Opener

subtract operate method
Subtract & Operate Method
  • Bottom-up approach
    • Assumes product or product concept exists
  • Steps
    • Remove one component of the assembly
      • Literally or Figuratively
    • “Operate” system through its full range
    • Analyze effect
    • Deduce the sub-function of the missing component
    • Repeat for all components
    • Modify function tree

Otto, K., Wood, Kristin L., Product Design: Techniques in Reverse Engineering and New Product Development, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle, NJ 2001, Chapter 5.

process flow can also be helpful
Process Flow Can Also be Helpful

High-Level View

Access Can

Secure Can

Actuate Opener

Separate Lid

Capture Lid

Access Contents

Low-Level View

Grasp Can

Attach Opener

Apply Lever

Pierce

Can

Rotate

Handle

Transmit Torque

Capture Lid

Access Content

exercise define your project s top level function 5 minutes
Exercise - Define your project’s top level function (5 minutes)
  • Remember that the top level function should manipulate material, energy and/or information that is external to your system
functional decomposition exercise 20 minutes
Functional Decomposition Exercise – (20 minutes)
  • Generate the 1st level (& 2nd Level, if possible) of Decomposition for your top level-function
    • Ensure that it is as solution independent as possible
subtract operate exercise 20 minutes
Subtract & Operate Exercise – (20 minutes)
  • Develop a hardware tree/bill of materials based on an existing solution or a benchmarked solution
    • Go to level that makes sense
  • Determine if the function the component is performing is
    • Represented in the function decomposition –or-
    • Is connected to a function in your decomposition
  • Modify function tree
5 step process ulrich eppinger pg 100
5-Step Process (Ulrich & Eppinger, pg. 100)

1. Clarify the

Problem

  • Clarify the Problem
    • Start from Product Definition
    • Decomposition
    • Prioritize
  • Search Externally
    • Lead users
    • Experts
    • Patents
    • Benchmarking
  • Search Internally
    • dfX Analysis
    • Field Feedback
    • Institutional Knowledge
    • Supply Chain
  • Explore Systematically
    • Classification Tree
    • Combination Tree
    • Morphological Analysis
    • TRIZ
  • Reflect on Process & Solutions

Sub-problems

2. Search

Externally

3. Search

Internally

Existing

Concepts

New

Concepts

4. Explore

Systematically

Integrated

Solutions

5. Reflect on

Solutions

secrets of concept generation
Secrets of Concept Generation
  • Employ many techniques
  • Focus on values / functions
  • Avoid premature closure
  • Generate several alternatives
    • “Sky High”
    • “Challenging technology”
    • “Low Risk”
  • Screen ideas systematically
    • e.g., Pugh selection process

Ishii, 2004

pahl and beitz morphological analysis
Pahl and BeitzMorphological Analysis
  • Morphology
    • Study of shape and form
  • Morph. Analysis
    • Systematic study to analyze the possible shape and form
  • Morphological Diagram
    • Example: Potato Harvesting Machine
start with functional diagram

Support

Subject

Conv.

Mass to

Signal

Measure

Weight

Indicate

Signal

Hold

Parts

Together

Start with Functional Diagram
  • Bathroom Scale Example
    • Expand Functions to manageable sub-functions

Ishii, 2004

use the function diagram to generate concepts
Use the Function Diagram to Generate Concepts
  • Bathroom Scale

Support

Subject

Plate

Box

Bubble

Conv.

Mass to

Signal

Strain

Gauge

Count

Molecules

Corn

Flakes

Spring

Measure

Weight

Indicate

Signal

Dial

Voice

Sound

Digital

Display

Hold

Parts

Together

Screws

Glue

Ishii, 2004

generate feasible solutions
Generate Feasible Solutions
  • Feasible (Conventional) Bathroom Scale

Support

Subject

Plate

Box

Bubble

Conv.

Mass to

Signal

Strain

Gauge

Count

Molecules

Corn

Flakes

Spring

Measure

Weight

Indicate

Signal

Dial

Voice

Sound

Digital

Display

Hold

Parts

Together

Screws

Glue

Ishii, 2004

generate sky high ideas too

Plate

Box

Bubble

Strain

Gauge

Count

Molecules

Corn

Flakes

Spring

Dial

Voice

Sound

Digital

Display

Glue

Generate “Sky high” Ideas too...
  • “Sharper Image” Bathroom Scale

Support

Subject

Conv.

Mass to

Signal

Measure

Weight

Indicate

Signal

Hold

Parts

Together

Screws

Ishii, 2004

morph chart
MorphChart

Douglas Axtell, Don Moran,

Jason Stanbro, Jim Vermeire,

0303-786 & 0303-788

Class Project, 2010

concept generation exercise morphological table 30 minutes
Concept Generation Exercise – Morphological Table(30 minutes)
  • Start generating your morphological table and finish for homework
desired output
Desired Output
  • Function Tree
    • 2-3 Layers of Decomposition
  • Subsystem Identification
    • Should be based both on existing artifact and functional analysis
  • Specification Flow-down
    • If you identify functional modules and/or subsystems, need to understand how you will assess them
    • Conceptually no different than what you did at the system-level

This will set you up for developing good solution alternatives

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