Response to Literature Upper Grades

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2. Objective. Today we will write a response to literature.. 3. What is a Response to Literature?. *Writing that shows your understanding of the literature. *Support your ideas by referring to the story and to what you already know.Memory PromptR

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Response to Literature Upper Grades

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1. 1 Response to Literature Upper Grades

2. 2

3. 3 What is a Response to Literature? *Writing that shows your understanding of the literature. *Support your ideas by referring to the story and to what you already know. Memory Prompt R&R- Respond by Referring

4. 4 Understand the Prompt Prompt: Fiddler Jones has a unique approach to life. The details of his life support the theme of the poem. Using the details, discuss the theme of the poem.

5. 5 Analyzing the Prompt (Manual 3-73 to 3-74) What will you write? an essay What/who is the topic? Fiddler Jones What will you do (verb)? discuss What will you discuss? the theme of the poem. How do I develop the essay? use details from his life

6. 6 Reading and Analysis of the Poem (Manual 8-6 to 8-13) Before beginning to read a poem, you should mark of the sentences in the poem by putting a hash mark (/) wherever you see a period or other end mark punctuation. When you learn to read poetry as sentences rather than lines, you understand the poem better.

7. 7 Fiddler Jones in Original Form – by Edgar Lee Masters (paraphrased) The earth keeps some vibration going There in your heart, and that is you. And if the people find you can fiddle, Why fiddle you must, for all your life. 5 What do you see, a harvest of clover? Or a meadow to walk through to the river? The wind’s in the corn; you rub your hands or else you hear the rustle of skirts Like the girls when dancing at Little Grove. 10 How could I till my forty acres Not to speak of getting more, With a medley of horns, bassoons and piccolos Stirred in my brain by crows and robins And the creak of a windmill – only these? 15 And I never started to plow in my life That someone did not stop in the road And take me away to a dance or picnic. I ended up with a broken fiddle, a thousand memories, And not a single regret. Read *Think *Repeat See the next slide for SENTENCE FORM

8. 8 Read the Poem in Sentence Form The earth keeps some vibration going there in your heart, and that is you. And if the people find you can fiddle, why fiddle you must, for all your life. What do you see, a harvest of clover? Or a meadow to walk through to the river? The wind’s in the corn; you rub your hands or else you hear the rustle of skirts Like the girls when dancing at Little Grove. How could I till my forty acres not to speak of getting more, with a medley of horns, bassoons and piccolos stirred in my brain by crows and robins and the creak of a windmill – only these? And I never started to plow in my life that someone did not stop in the road and take me away to a dance or picnic. I ended up with a broken fiddle, a thousand memories, and not a single regret. Read *Think *Repeat ********************************Read *Think *Repeat

9. 9 Understanding the Poem Who : Fiddler Jones What: fiddled all his life When- a long time ago Where- in the fields Why- because it was his passion in life Examples/Categories from the poem: artistic view of the world, musician, shared his talent, lived life without regret, etc.

10. 10 The Introductory Paragraph Must contain the following Summary Statement Plan Sentence Thesis Statement

11. 11 Quick Summary Statement for the Introductory Paragraph (like finding the main idea) Name the title, author and genre (Adding the Blues Manual 2-35 to 2-37; 4-32 to 4-35) Think who or what is the writing mostly about? What the subject does or is Example: In the poem Fiddle Jones by Edgar Lee Masters, Fiddler Jones speaks from his grave to talk about how he lived his life.

12. 12 Writing the Plan Sentence (Manual 4-18 to 4-19) Introductory Paragraph A plan sentence focuses your ideas and organize your essay. The prompt asks that the essay be developed using details from Fiddler’s life. Think of three points or categories. The categories can be determined by drawing conclusions about Fiddler Jones’ character or words to describe his personality. Some possibilities are artistic, not caring about financial success, embracing his talent, sharing his talent. Example: Because Fiddler Jones had the soul of an artist and a talent that he freely shared, he died without “a single regret.”

13. 13 Developing the Thesis: Introductory Paragraph (Manual 2-21 to 2-34; 4-17 to 4-18) Demonstrate how to use important words from the prompt to create a working thesis. Example: Fiddler Jones’ unique approach to life teaches us that if we are true to ourselves, we will live a life without regret. Example: Because Fiddler Jones had a unique approach to life, the theme of the poem is that if we are true to ourselves, we will live a life without regret. Example: We can choose to live our lives as others expect us to do, or we can heed the theme of “Fiddler Jones” and be true to ourselves.

14. 14 Put it Together for the Introductory Paragraph In the poem, “Fiddler Jones” by Edgar Lee Masters, the title character speaks from his grave to describe a life lived with joy. As he had the soul of an artist and a talent that he freely shared, he died without “a single regret.” Fiddler Jones’ unique approach to life teaches us that if we are true to ourselves, we will live a life without regret

15. 15 Writing the Body Block it Out / Outline RDF Transition + RFD Reasons/ Facts/ Details 2)Add the E’s Examples * Evidence * Explanation * Events * Experience * Elaboration * Expert Opinions * Effective Illustrations * Embedded Quotes

16. 16 Outline/ “Block Out” the body of the essay using your Projected Plan (manual 4-20 to 4-27) Transition + RDF

17. 17 Add Your E’s- Body paragraph 1 1)Transition + Reason/ Fact/ Detail (from you plan) Example: Fiddle Jones had the soul of an artist, finding beauty all around him. —saw world differently ?not entrepreneur ?no more land ?pasture -“walk to river” —music in everyday ? “rustle of skirts”

18. 18 Add Your E’s -Body Paragraph 2 1)Transition + Reason/ Fact/ Detail (from you plan) Example: More importantly, freely sharing his talent brought joy to others 2)Add your e’s —fiddling was his gift —played for others ?dances, picnics —didn’t add to wealth —“investment” returned ? “thousand memories” ? “not a single regret

19. 19 Add Your E’s- Body Paragraph3 1) Transition + Reason/ Fact/ Detail (from you plan) Example: From the theme of the poem, we learn how to live a full life. 2) Add your e’s —find a joyful approach to life ?find your gift ?share with others —find joy in simple things

20. 20 Adding Quotations : Add one or two quotations to each body section of the outline The rules for quotations: A quotation is any group of words copied from the passage. It does not have to be dialogue. Never copy a complete sentence, instead find a part of a sentence that is an effective use of language or provides specific detail. Embed the quotation in a sentence so that a person hearing the sentence would not know where the quote began or ended.

21. 21 Example Unlike other people, Fiddler Jones heard “a medley of horns, bassoons, and piccolos” instead of the harsh cries of robins and crows. Instead of hearing the wind as a sign that harvest was near, he heard “the rustle of skirts / Like the girls dancing.”

22. 22 Adding the E’s Quotation and Response (Manual 8-11 to 8-12).

23. 23 Conclusions Summarize- Summarize the information Convince- Convince the reader of your position Challenge- Challenge the reader to think Encourage- Encourage the reader to take action

24. 24 Ideas for the Conclusion (Manual 4-55 to 4-59) Examples: Summarize- Summarize the information Obviously, everyone’s definition of success is different. Perhaps some people are satisfied with being wealthy or well known. However, if more people followed Fiddler Jones’ example, many more people would arrive at the end of their lives with “a thousand memories / And not a single regret.” Convince- Convince the reader of your position Fiddler Jones’ joy in simple, everyday experiences and his willingness to share his gift of music gave him a life that he could look back upon with “a thousand memories / And not a single regret.” Few characters in literature and few people in real life can come to the end of their lives and say the same thing. Challenge- Challenge the reader to think If more people heeded the theme of “Fiddler Jones,” more of us would arrive at old age with “a thousand memories / And not a single regret.” Not only would we be much better for the experience but also so would the world.

25. 25 Adding the Blues The Lead * Hook * Grabber * Attention Getter The blues are your background. They can entertain, educate, or provide extra interesting information. Not all essays need “The Blues.” Note- the blue in this essay on Fiddler Jones was your summary statement. Blues may be part of the introductory paragraph or its own paragraph. In the poem Fiddle Jones by Edgar Lee Masters, Fiddler Jones speaks from his grave to talk about how he lived his life.

26. 26 Adding the Blues - Example “To thine own self be true.” William Shakespeare put these words in the mouth of Polonious, one of literature’s true fusspots. However, the advice remains some of the best that Shakespeare ever offered.

27. 27 Revise /Edit/ Publish Organization- rate 4,3,2,or 1(4 is the best) Strong thesis/ addresses the prompt/compelling /interesting Reasons, Facts, Details strongly support the topic Effective examples/ elaboration given Strong conclusion/ revisits the topic/ interesting Varied transitions/ natural sounding

28. 28 Content – rate 4,3,2,or 1 Quality and quantity or information related to the topic and entertains/ educates the reader. Intriguing examples, evidence, and explanations bring prompt to life. Fully develops the prompt.

29. 29 Style – rate 4,3,2,1 A variety of sentence structure (simple, compound, complex) variety in the way sentences begin. Rich words, content, vocabulary/ or figurative language to create mental pictures. Style uses specific words and sentence structures that reflect a specific purpose.

30. 30 Grammar and Mechanics- CUPS Very few errors in capitalization- usage- punctuation -spelling

31. 31 Encouraging Revision Revision Improve the paper Edit CUPS changes Proofread For errors in final copy Revision, editing, and proofreading are terms that are sometimes used interchangeably. In Step Up to Writing, we use the word revision when discussing ways to improve the flow, the logic or the organizational aspect of a paper. “Editing,” is our term for making mechanical, grammatical and spelling changes in the draft version. And ‘proofreading,” Is one term for checking for any errors that are in the final CUPS.Revision, editing, and proofreading are terms that are sometimes used interchangeably. In Step Up to Writing, we use the word revision when discussing ways to improve the flow, the logic or the organizational aspect of a paper. “Editing,” is our term for making mechanical, grammatical and spelling changes in the draft version. And ‘proofreading,” Is one term for checking for any errors that are in the final CUPS.

32. 32 Fiddler Jones: A Life Well-Lived In the poem, “Fiddler Jones” by Edgar Lee Masters, the title character speaks from his grave to describe a life lived with joy. Because Fiddler Jones chose to embrace his talent and personality, we can learn from the poem’s theme and be true to ourselves. Fiddler had the soul of an artist and a talent that he freely shared; as a result, he could look back at his life without “a single regret.” Fiddler Jones had the soul of an artist, finding beauty all around him. He was not interested in being a financial success. In fact, he found it difficult to farm his 40 acres because the beauty around him caused constant distractions. He saw a pasture of clover not as a cash crop but as “a meadow to walk through to the river.” More importantly, sharing his gift of music brought joy not only to others but also to Fiddler. He tells us that if we have a gift, his being fiddling, we must share it. He speaks of the gift as a “vibration going / There in your heart,” and tells us that we must share that gift as he did. Whenever he began to plow, someone would “take [him] away to a dance or picnic.” The constant distractions didn’t add to his worldly wealth. Indeed, he never owned more than forty acres; however, his investment in the joy of others was fully returned. From beyond the grave, Fiddler looks back to realize what a joy his life was, for he had “a thousand memories / And not a single regret.” From the theme of the poem, we learn how to live a full life. Like Fiddler, each of us needs to discover the person we are meant to be. If we find that joy comes from being content with simple pleasures, then we need to stop to appreciate the world around us. However, Fiddler Jones teaches us to find our talents and willingly share them with others. Helping others or bringing them happiness returns to us twofold. If more people heeded the theme of “Fiddler Jones,” more of us would arrive at old age with “a thousand memories / And not a single regret.” Not only would we be much better for the experience but also so would the world.

33. 33 Closure What is a response to literature? Writing that shows your understanding of the literature. 2) What does R&R stand for? Respond by Referring 3)How do you embed a quote in a sentence? Find a part of a sentence that is an effective use of language or provides specific detail.Embed the quotation in a sentence so that a person hearing the sentence would not know where the quote began or ended. 4) Share/ Read your Essay aloud

34. 34 Independent Practice Choose one of the following prompts and poems to write a response to literature.

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36. 36 Precious Stones by Christina Georgina Rossetti An emerald is as green as grass; A ruby red as blood; A sapphire shines as blue as heaven; A flint lies in the mud. A diamond is a brilliant stone, To catch the world's desire; An opal holds a fiery spark; But a flint holds fire.

37. 37 Prompt Two In the following poem George Gray talks about his life. Using his examples, discuss the theme of the poem.

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