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Animation Power Framing slides with headers and footers Animating menus Animating boxes Matching “Effects” with message Deconstructing objects for sequential animation Playing with the whole slide The concluding slide Training Presentation # 3 Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner

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Animation power l.jpg
Animation Power

  • Framing slides with headers and footers

  • Animating menus

  • Animating boxes

  • Matching “Effects” with message

  • Deconstructing objects for sequential animation

  • Playing with the whole slide

  • The concluding slide


Slide2 l.jpg

Training Presentation # 3

Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner

The Planner and

Instructional Design

© Queen’s Printer for Ontario, 2002


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© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

  • Welcome to this presentation about the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner Official Version 3.0

  • This presentation will explore:

    • principlesof instructional design

    • application of these principles indesigning effective instructional units using the Planner

  • The menu that follows outlines the key components of this presentation.


Main menu l.jpg
MAIN MENU

  • 1. Principles of instructional design

  • 2. The Planner as a design tool

  • Steps in unit planning

  • Effective units

Click a Subtitle to jump to that section. Click the Spacebar to go to next slide.

4


1 principles of instructional design l.jpg
1. Principles of instructional design

  • 1.1 Planning and implementation

  • 1.2 Key questions for planning

  • 1.3 Expectation-based planning

  • 1.4 Instructional elements

Menu

5


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1.1 Planning and implementation

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

  • Successful learning experiences require effective planning and implementation.


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1.2 Key questions for planning

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

1.What do I want students to learn?*

3. How will I design instruction for effective learning for all?

2. What evidence will I accept of that learning?*

  • Three questions are key for planning.

  • * (Ralph W. Tyler, “Basic Principles of Curriculum and Instruction”,1949)


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1.3 Expectation-based planning

1.What do you want students to learn?

EXPECTATIONS

2. What evidence will you accept of that learning?

ACHIEVEMENT LEVELS

TEACHING/LEARNING STRATEGIES

3. How will you design instruction for effective learning for all?

RESOURCES

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

Key Questions

Ontario Curriculum

  • In implementing the Ontario curriculum, teachers should plan programs based on the expectations.


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1.3 Expectation-based planning

Topic /

Theme /

Resources

Teaching /

Learning

Strategies

Assessment

and

Evaluation

Expectations

Topic /

Theme /

Resources

Teaching /

Learning

Strategies

Assessment

and

Evaluation

Expectations

Assessment

and

Evaluation

Teaching /

Learning

Strategies

Topic /

Theme /

Resources

Expectations

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

Awareness

Shift

Practising

Shift

Incorporation

  • Expectations-based planning shifts the emphasis from teacher designing by objectives to student achievement of expectations.

Based on material by Thames Valley District School Board


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1.3 Expectation-based planning

Elementary Achievement Chart

Secondary Achievement Chart

Elementary Task Rubric from Exemplars

Secondary Task Rubric from Exemplars

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

  • Expectation-based planning that keeps assessment in mind (e.g., achievement charts, task-specific rubrics, exemplars) helps to provide observable and measurable criteria to enable us to “know it when we see it.”


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1.4 Instructional elements

Expectations

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

  • To plan effective units, consider the following instructional elements:

  • 1. Begin with the curriculumexpectations to focus on desired results, i.e., what we want students to learn.


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1.4 Instructional elements

Expectations

Performance Tasks and Criteria

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

  • 2. Design units around performance- based tasks (and criteria)that encourage meaningful and authentic learning experiences for students.


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1.4 Instructional elements

Assessment

and

Evaluation

Expectations

Performance Tasks and Criteria

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

  • 3. Incorporate appropriate assessmentand evaluationthat lead to improvement and provide the evidence needed to demonstrate achievement.


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1.4 Instructional elements

Assessment

and

Evaluation

Expectations

Performance Tasks and Criteria

Teaching/

Learning

Strategies

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

  • 4. Develop appropriate teaching/learning strategies that provide rich experiences and success for all.


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1.4 Instructional elements

Assessment

and

Evaluation

Expectations

Performance Tasks and Criteria

Topic /

Theme /

Resources

Teaching/

Learning

Strategies

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

  • 5. Focus on topics and themes that address key concepts, big ideas, and enduring understandings. Gather a variety of resources to support the learning.


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2. The Planner as a design tool

  • 2.1 The structure of the Planner

  • 2.2 The design-down approach

  • 2.3 Flexible data entry

Menu

16


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2.1 The structure of the Planner

Expectations

Assessment

Evaluation

Performance Tasks and Criteria

Topic /

Theme /

Resources

Teaching /

Learning

Strategies

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

  • Designing units and programs/profiles is made easy by the Planner’s structure, which reflects the elements of expectation-based design.


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2.1 The structure of the Planner

Unit Info

PAGE 1

UNIT INFO

Cover

UNIT INFO

Inside

Unit

Overview

PAGE 2

OVERVIEW

Expectns

OVERVIEW

Page 2

Subtasks

SUBTASK

List

SUBTASK

Page 1

Analysis

ANALYSIS

Expectns

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

  • These elements are organized by a consistent set of navigational tabsacross all of the authoring environments.


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2.1 The structure of the Planner

IDENTIFY title, subtitle and authors(s).

Unit Info

1

SUMMARIZE subtasks, expectations, strategies and resources.

Unit Overview

Subtasks

DETAIL subtasks, expectations, strategies, adaptations, and resources.

Analysis

2

ANALYSE expectations, strategies, and resources.

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

  • For instance, the four main tabs of the Open Environment help you navigate logically from general unit information and overview (1) to subtask detail and analysis (2).


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2.2 The design-down approach

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

Culminating Task

Subtask 4

Subtask 3

Subtask 2

Assessment Subtask 1

The Planner highlights the design-down model of the planning process – from culminating task to sequential subtasks or activities.


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2.2 The design-down approach

Teacher Design

Student Demonstration

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

Culminating Task

Subtask 4

Subtask 3

Subtask 2

Assessment Subtask 1

Such a unit is said to be “designed down and delivered up.”


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Menu

Exit

  • Thank you for viewing this presentation:

  • The Planner and Instructional Design

  • For other presentations go to www.ocup.org

© Queen’s Printer for Ontario, 2002

22


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1.1 What is the Planner?

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

The Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner is a software application and resource library on CD-ROM – installed on Windows and Macintosh computers – designed to help teachers implement the Ontario curriculum.


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1.1 What is the Planner?

Field-test

versions to schools

Training to boards

Official

Version

2002

Pilot versions

and teacher feedback

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

From 1998, the Ontario Ministry of Education has developed the Planner in cooperation with elementary and secondary teachers.


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1.2 How can the Planner help teachers?

OSS

Special Ed

Expectations

ESL/ELD

Considerations

Groupings

Resources

Choices into Action

Teaching/ Learning Strategies

Pedagogy

Report Card

Print

Exemplars

Media

Assessment

Evaluation

Rubrics

Digital

Performance Tasks

Units/

Profiles

Policy

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

  • Implementation of the Ontario curriculum requires knowledge of policy, assessment and evaluation practices, up-to-date pedagogy, and varied resources.


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1.2 How can the Planner help teachers?

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

All Ontario

curriculum expectations

Authoring templates

& rubric maker

Teaching

Companions

Analysis

tools

AppleWorks (Macintosh/PC)

The Planner contains a comprehensive library of

  • curriculum resources,

  • planning and writing tools

  • electronic databases.


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1.2 How can the Planner help teachers?

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

Teachers can access the Planner’s tools and resourceson home and school computers– at the click of a button.


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1.2 How can the Planner help teachers?

Staci Rushton, Donna Cox (Project Leader)

Renfrew DSB

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

Design

Share

Adapt

Manage

The Planner enables teachers at all levels of experience to design, share, adapt, and manage excellent plans, units, and course profiles for classroom use.


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2.1 Design templates

New in 3.0

Revised

prompt text

© Queen’s Printer for

Ontario, 2002

Outlines unit in two pages

Uses 8½ x 11 WYSIWYG format

Expands to fit contents

Combines units for year/course

Use the Planner’s versatile templates to create units, course outlines, programs and profiles, handouts, rubrics, and resource lists.


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