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Essentials on Credentials. Frankfort, KY March 27. How to Provide Market-valued Credentials and Improve WIA Performance Outcomes for Youth Now and In the Future. Essentials of Credentials: Workshop Goals.

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essentials on credentials

Essentials on Credentials

Frankfort, KY

March 27

How to Provide Market-valued Credentials and Improve WIA Performance Outcomes for Youth Now and In the Future

essentials of credentials workshop goals
Essentials of Credentials: Workshop Goals
  • Learn about the new credential definition and implications for programs design and delivery;
  • Explore several training paths and program components that lead to successful employment and attainment of credentials.
  • Discuss ideas for retaining youth in programs.
  • Prepare for the Common Measures.
essentials of credentials why they matter
Essentials of Credentials: Why They Matter
  • Why business cares
  • Why youth care
  • Why local Workforce Boards care
  • Why the US Department of Labor cares
why business cares
Why Business Cares
  • Increasing global competition and technological change places a premium on worker with education and skills
  • New Conference Board survey suggest even current HS graduates deficient in:
    • 3 Rs: reading, writing and math
    • Written communication, problem solving and professionalism
slide6

Why Youth Should Care

Industry approved certifications available from Automotive Service Excellence - ASE

  • Entry Level Technician: General experience or course work in automotive repair $28,000
  • Mid Level Technician: ASE certifications in at least one automotive specialty area such as breaks, engine performance, etc. $43,000
  • Master Level Technician: ASE certification in all eight automotive specialty areas. $66,000+
slide7

Why Else Should Youth Care

1. Credential demonstrates commitment and achievement.

2. Credential signifies existence of skills

3. Credential improves career opportunities and advancement

4. Credential provides foundation for additional education.

slide8

WhyLocal Workforce Boards Care

1. Degree or credential creates a sense of achievement for youth and can build self esteem.

2. Credential can be the first step in a youth/workers continuous learning process.

3. Employers need higher skilled workers.

4. US DOL’s Performance Measures.

why us department of labor cares
Why US Department of Labor Cares
  • Many at-risk youth left behind in today’s economy.
  • Business needs educated and skilled workers now and in future; impending labor shortages.
  • Optimize return on DOL and other federal investments in education and training.
us department of labor youth vision
US Department of LaborYouth Vision
  • Connect out-of-school and at-risk youth with quality secondary and postsecondary education and training.
  • Insure that education and training opportunities meet the demands of business and respond to the needs of high demand occupations.
new definition certificate
New Definition: Certificate

An official recognition by a state education body or professional, industry or employer association of an individual’s attainment of measurable technical or occupational skills necessary to gain employment or advance within an occupation. The skills are based on standards developed or endorsed by employers. Certificates awarded by workforce investment boards or for work readiness attributes are not included in this definition.

slide13

New Definition of Certificate

  • Awarded in recognition of measurable technical or occupational skills.
  • Based on standards developed or endorsed by employers.
  • Does not include work readiness certificates.
  • Does not include credentials awarded by local WIBs.
  • Definition of credential and certificate are the same.
slide14

Definition of Certificate

Must be awarded by:

  • State educational or vocational and technical educational agency
  • Institution of Higher Education
  • Professional, industry or employer organization
  • Registered apprenticeship program
  • Public regulatory agency
  • Program approved by the Department of Veterans Affairs
  • Office of Job Corps
  • Tribal Colleges
implications of new certificate definition
Implications of New Certificate Definition
  • In effect as of July 1, 2006.
  • Applicable to all youth measures, current and common youth measures (when implemented).
  • “Raises the bar” on what is acceptable and can be counted toward credential measure.
new definition advanced training occupational skills training
New Definition: Advanced Training/ Occupational Skills Training

An organized program of study involving specific vocational skill proficiencies that leads to the attainment of a certificate. Such training should be outcome oriented, long-term in nature and commence upon program exit rather than being short-term while enrolled in WIA youth program.

slide17

New Definition of Advanced Training

  • Must be a formal program leading to a certificate.
  • Should be outcome oriented and focused on long-term goals of ISS.
  • Must commence after exit.
  • To count as a placement in youth common measures must result in a certificate.
implications of new advanced training definition
Implications of New Advanced Training Definition
  • In effect as of July 1, 2006.
  • Applicable to all youth measures, current and common youth measures (when implemented).
  • “Raises the bar” on what constitutes advanced training/occupational skills training and therefore what can be counted in measures.
performance measures
Performance Measures

Question:What performance measures are currently calculated for WIA youth?

younger and older youth performance measures
Younger and Older Youth Performance Measures

Younger Youth (14-18 yrs.)

- Skill Attainment Rate

- Diploma or Equivalent Attainment Rate

- Retention Rate

Older Youth (19-21 yrs.)

- Entered Employment Rate

- Employment Retention Rate

- Earnings Change

- Credential Attainment Rate

youth common measures
Youth Common Measures

All Youth (14-21 yrs.)*

- Placement in Employment and Education

- Attainment of a Degree or Certificate

- Literacy and Numeracy Gain

*Although common measures are calculated, states are not held accountable for achieving performance standards at this time, except those that have received a waiver to implement them.

slide22

Youth Performance Measures

Common Measures to be Reported Only *(Older and Younger Youth combined)

Old WIA Measures With Negotiated Goals

Placement in Employment or Education

Older Youth Entered Employment

No Equivalent

Older Youth Earnings Change

Younger Youth Retention

Older Youth Employment Retention

Attainment of Degree or Certificate

Younger Youth Diploma or Equivalent Attainment

Older Youth Employment And Credential

Younger Youth Skill Attainment

Literacy and Numeracy Gains

*Except for States with Waivers

youth measures requiring a credential outcome

Younger and Older Youth Measures- Credential Attainment Rate for Older Youth Common Measures- Attainment of a Degree or Certificate

Youth Measures Requiring a Credential Outcome

old measure older youth credential certificate rate
Old Measure:

Older Youth Credential / Certificate Rate

slide25

Older Youth:Credential/Certificate Rate

Official definition: The number of Older Youth who are employed or are in post-secondary education or advanced training in the 1st quarter after exit and receive a credential by the end of the 3rd quarter after exit divided by the number of Older Youth who exit during the quarter.

slide26

Older Youth:Credential/Certificate Rate

Simplified definition: Measures percentage of all Older Youth who earn a credential during the program or within several months leaving services. They must also have a job, or be in postsecondary education or advanced training soon after leaving the program.

  • All Older Youth are included in the credential measure.
slide27

Older Youth:Credential/Certificate Rate

Positive Performance Outcome:

Older Youth receive a credential by the end of the third quarter after exit AND are employed or in postsecondary or advanced training during the 1st quarter after exit.

slide28

Older Youth:Credential/Certificate Rate

Positive Performance Outcome:

Not employed or in post secondary education or advanced training during the 1st quarter after exit results in a negative even if a credential is attained!

slide29

Older Youth Credential/Certificate Rate

JUN

Needs to Attain Degree or Certificate by the end of 3rd Quarter after exit

Graduates and Exits

3rd Quarter after exit

key factors contributing positive outcomes
Key Factors Contributing Positive Outcomes:

In Employment or Postsecondary

Or Advanced Training in 1st quarter

  • Youth completes program services
  • Youth engages in acceptable activity in first quarter, remember new definition of advanced training
  • All youth receive effective follow-up services
    • Employment retention
    • Re-employment and career advancement
    • Needed supportive services All outcomes are tracked and recorded
key factors contributing positive outcomes1
Key Factors Contributing Positive Outcomes:

Obtains Credential by 3rd Quarter

Youth are enrolled in training programs that lead to viable credentials

  • Providers must know what credentials count in the state, taking into account the new definition
  • Most youth successfully complete training programs
  • All youth receive effective follow up services
  • Outcomes are tracked and recorded
older youth credential rate
Older Youth: Credential Rate

Calculation:

Number who attain a credential by 3rd qtr. after exit and are employed, in advanced training or post-secondary education in 1st qtr. after exit

Divided by

Number of Exiters during the Quarter

Example:

120w/credential by 3rd qtr. after exit-25*=95 =63%

150 exiters

*These 25 were not employed or enrolled in advanced training or postsecondary education in the 1st qtr. after exit.

older youth credential quiz
Older Youth Credential Quiz

Marcus is 20 years old. He began participating in your program a year ago, unemployed. He enrolled in a medical records assistant training program sponsored by a local health care industry association, but did not take the certification exam prior to his exit date. He has a job at exit.

  • What are the performance implications?
  • What are the service strategy implications?
slide35

Attainment of Degree or Certificate

Official Definition: Of those enrolled in education (at the date of participation or at any point during the program): The number of participants who attain a diploma, GED, or certificate by the end of the third quarter after the exit quarter divided by the number of participants who exit during the quarter.

slide36

Attainment of Degree or Certificate

Simplified Definition: Measures the percentage of youth participants (older and younger) who are enrolled in any organized program of study and receive a diploma or certificate within several months after exit.

slide37

New Definition of Certificate

  • Awarded in recognition of measurable technical or occupational skills.
  • Based on standards developed or endorsed by employers.
  • Does not include work readiness certificates.
  • Does not include credentials awarded by local WIBs.
  • Definition of credential and certificate are the same.
attainment of degree or certificate
Attainment of Degree or Certificate

Only youth who are “in education” at any time during WIA are included in this measure.

Includes youth in:

  • secondary school
  • post-secondary school
  • adult education
  • other organized program leading to a degree or a certificate
slide39

Attainment of Degree or Certificate

Positive Performance Outcome:

  • Youth participants in education who receive a diploma or certificate by the end of the third quarter after exit.
slide40

Attainment of Degree or Certificate

Key factors contributing to positive outcome:

  • Educational/training program completion
  • Ensure that the diploma or certificate meets the required standards and are countable
  • Ensure that participants have all necessary supports to help them attain a diploma or certificate
slide41

Attainment of Degree or Certificate

Key factors contributing to positive outcome:

  • Prevent school/program drop-outs
  • Provide effective follow-up services and tracking
  • Be sure to record degrees and certificates.
slide42

Attainment of Degree or Certificate

Calculation Example:

156 exiters attained a diploma or certificate = 71%

220 exiters in education

slide43

Attainment of Degree or Certificate

Data Collection and Reporting

Potential data sources

  • Individuals: Case management notes and surveys of participants
  • Institutions: Record-sharing agreements with
    • community colleges
    • universities
    • state education associations
    • licensing boards
    • training institutions
    • professional, industry or employer organizations
    • ABE/GED providers
slide44

Attainment of Degree or Certificate

Data Collection and Reporting

Data Tracking

  • Double check tracking systems (MIS) to make sure coding matches up with new definitions and restrictions.
  • Make sure tracking forms have been adapted to match new certificate definitions.
slide45

Attainment of Degree or Certificate Quiz

Jerome is an out-of-schoolyouth who exited from theWIA program on January 13 with a job. He started a GED class while in WIA but did not complete all of the requirements until the July after he exited.

What is Jerome’s performance outcome for Attainment of Degree or Certificate?

scenario service considerations and projected outcomes
Scenario: Service Considerations and Projected Outcomes

Anna is a 19 year old who is limited English proficient and is currently enrolled in a Spanish language GED class at a local community college so she can obtain her GED.

What do you need to consider in serving Anna, so that she achieves good outcomes?

slide47

Key Factors Contributing to a Positive Common Measures Outcome

Not all youth must earn a certificate - only those enrolled in the common measures’ definition of “education.”

Providers must know what credentials count in the state, taking into account the new definition of a certificate.

The factors of completion, follow up services and tracking and recording noted earlier.

in summary key issues of new credential definition
In Summary: Key Issues of New Credential Definition
  • New definition applies to older youth measures and new common measures.
  • Many locally recognized credentials under old definition may not count as a certificate.
  • Generic soft skills certificates, such as work readiness credentials, do not count under new definition.
key issues of new advanced training occupational skills training definition
Key Issues of New Advanced Training/Occupational Skills Training Definition
  • New definition applies to old and new common measures
  • Definition of an acceptable advanced or occupational skills training program is more rigorous.
  • Programs that don’t meet this definition may affect 1st quarter outcome in OY credential measure and youth common measure of placement in employment and education.
slide52
Developing and implementing a youth program that focuses on connecting youth to high quality educational and training activities.

What is Strategic Program Design?

Developing and implementing a youth program that focuses on connecting youth to and retaining them in high quality educational and training activities

slide53

Key Elements of Strategic Program Design

Labor Market Considerations

Multiple Paths to Achieve a Credential

Access to Pertinent Certificates

Capacity to Connect or Deliver Effective Education and Training

Committed Program Management

slide54

1. Labor Market Considerations

What available jobs are appropriate for young workers?

Which employers will hire young workers?

What skills are required for these jobs?

What credentials validate the skills and are valued by local employers?

labor market information
Labor Market Information
  • Conduct targeted analysis with focus on youth
  • Identify high demand, growth occupations open to employing youth
  • Map out job advancement and training pathways with credentials for high demand occupations
labor market information1
Labor Market Information
  • Multiple sources of information at local, state and national.
  • Nationally see sources such as America’s CareerOneStop Portal and Career Information Network
  • For a list of sources go to:

http://www.doleta.gov/youth_services/pdf/youth_parents_tools.pdf

slide57

Multiple Paths to Achieve a Credential

HS-Diploma/ GED

Nationally/ State/

Industry Certified

slide58

Multiple Paths to HS Diploma

1. Focused assistance and support within HS program (e.g., tutoring, work readiness, basic skills, after school/Sat. activities, reward with summer work experience )

2. Targeted programs combining HS education with occupational learning (e.g., Automotive Youth Education Systems)

3. Alternative education providers (e.g., YouthBuild USA National Schools Initiative and selected Job Corp sites)

slide59

Multiple Paths to GED

Adult education system and providers

Non-profit training providers (e.g., CET, Youth Build, Job Corp)

slide60

GED Essentials

1. Appealing and accessible to youth

2. Provide adequate case management and supports

3. Assistance given for testing arrangements, including paying for the test

4. Incentives for participation, GED milestone achievement, and documentation

slide61

Key Elements for GED Programs

GED taught functionally — i.e. math, reading, writing skills taught in context of work

Peer learning activities are included

Staff can teach to a variety of learning styles

key elements for ged programs
Key Elements for GED Programs

Opportunities to work and take GED class simultaneously

Location for classes is inviting and appealing for youth

slide63

Multiple Paths to Occupational Certificates

Adult career or vocational centers

Postsecondary Institutions: community colleges and private trade schools

Non-profit providers: community-based organizations and specialized training providers

Labor and employer associations

slide64

1

2

3

3. Access to Occupational Certificates

Know what training is tied to high demand, growth occupations

Know what training leads to a countable certificate as approved by the state, industry or employer association.

Know what training is affordable, achievable and is part of a pathway for additional training and education

slide65

Examples of Industry Recognized Credentials

A + Certification

Microsoft Online User Specialist

Cisco Certified Network Associate

Certified Phlebotomist

Licensed Physical Therapy Assistant

Certified Medical Transcriptionist

examples of industry recognized credentials
Examples of Industry Recognized Credentials

Certified Landscape Professional

Carpenter’s Helper

Certified Cable Installation Technician

slide67

Example: Automotive Repair Technician

Industry approved certifications available from Automotive Service Excellence - ASE

  • Entry Level Technician: General experience or course work in automotive repair $28,000
  • Mid Level Technician: ASE certifications in at least one automotive specialty area such as breaks, engine performance, etc. $43,000
  • Master Level Technician: ASE certification in all eight automotive specialty areas. $66,000+
slide68

Capacity to Connect or Deliver Effective Education & Training

Providers committed to education and training

A strong network of education/training institutions to maximize and leverage resources to support participants

why providers must be committed to education and training
Why Providers Must Be Committed to Education and Training?

All older youth are still subject to the older youth measure and therefore must achieve a credential. In addition, providers are responsible for ensuring that youth are prepared to succeed in the labor market … education and skills are the most valuable assets for employment in good paying jobs with advancement opportunities.

checklist to identify committed providers
Checklist to Identify Committed Providers

Do Providers:

  • Connect to State educational or vocational and technical educational agencies
  • Deliver adequate assessments/assistance for career exploration?
  • Offer training that leads to a recognized credential?
  • Offer training that is valued by employers and youth?
  • Support youth while in education and training and focus on successful program completion?
  • Have strong job development services or a partner with others who do?
  • Have strong connections to post-secondary education?
why a strong network for education and training
Why a Strong Network for Education and Training?

Youth have different interests and needs and should be able to choose training aligned with those interests and needs. Therefore:

  • Support and develop a variety of training options and venues
  • Offer training in multiple industry sectors
  • Insure that institutions are committed to addressing the needs of at-risk youth.
slide72

Develop a Strong Network by Providing Options For:

Boutique (full-service) training—e.g. GED taught simultaneously with skills training

Vouchers for training at community college or vocational school with wrap around support services provided by youth provider. DOL provides waivers for youth vouchers.

Partnerships among organizations—e.g. a community college provides skills training and a community group provides GED and supports.

slide73

Provide Education/Training Related Supports

Assistance with training requirements—registration, enrollment, additional financial aid if needed, placement testing

Help purchasing tools, books or unusual supplies for training,

Special tutorial assistance for training and test, Financial assistance for taking test or getting license.

slide74

Provide Overall Participant Supports

Committed staff who want to work with, and know how to work with youth (good listeners)

Childcare and transportation available

Help handling negative peer pressure

Frequent/Fun check-ins during program

On-going retention and follow up support

slide75

5. Committed Program Management

Solicit and select providers that can offer training that results in credentials and employment

Require service supports; staff and resources.

Solidify proposed partnerships.

Dedicated staff to monitor providers and manage record keeping, tracking and ongoing performance management.

common measures
All Youth (14-21 yrs.)*

* Placement in Employment and Education

- Attainment of a Degree of Certificate

* Literacy and Numeracy Gain

*Although common measures are calculated, states are not held accountable for achieving performance standards at this time, except those that have received a waiver to implement them.

Common Measures
slide78

Common Measure

Placement in Employment or Education

slide79
Official Definition: Of those who are NOT in post-secondary education, employment, or the military at the date of participation: The number of participants who are in employment or the military or enrolled in post-secondary education and/or advanced training/occupational skills training in the first quarter after the exit quarter divided by the number of participants who exit during the quarter.

Placement in Employment or Education

slide80
Simplified Definition: Measures the percentage of all youth (older and younger), excluding those employed, in the military or in post-secondary education at the start of the program, who are engaged in one of the following soon after leaving:

Employment

Military

Post-secondary education

Advanced Training/Occupational Skills Training

Placement in Employment or Education

slide81
Positive Performance Outcome:

Youth must be engaged in one of the following five activities during the 1st quarter after exit:

Employment

Military

Post-secondary education

Advanced Training

Occupational Skills Training

Placement in Employment or Education

slide82
Key Factors Contributing to a Positive Outcome:

Retain youth through service/program completion.

Avoid exiting youth until you are sure they are ready and have the support to succeed in post-program activity.

Placement in Employment or Education

slide83
Key Factors Contributing to a Positive Outcome:

Do not exit youth who were in secondary school at date of participation until they have been placed into:

employment

post-secondary school

military

advanced training.

Placement in Employment or Education

slide84
Calculation Example:

142 exiters in qualifying outcomes in 1st qtr. after exit = 77%

185 exiters

Excluded from this measure are those who were employed, in the military, or in post-secondary education at date of participation.

Placement in Employment or Education

slide85

Quiz: Placement in Employment or Education

Amy entered the WIA Youth program in January of her junior year in high school. She exited from the program on April 10 of her senior year with a new job. On May 28, she lost her job and remained unemployed through October.

What is her performance outcome for Placement in Employment or Education?

slide87
Official Definition: Of those out-of-school youth who are basic skills deficient: The number of participants who increase one or more educational functioning levels divided by the number of participants who have completed a year in the program (ie., one year from the date of program participation) plus the number of participants who exit before completing a year in the program.

Literacy and Numeracy Measure

slide88
Simplified Definition: Measures the percentage of basic skills deficient out-of-school youth who increased one or more educational functioning levels within one year of youth program participation.

Literacy and Numeracy Measure

slide89
Comparison with YY Skill Attainment:

Common Measure Changes

Evaluates gains in educational functioning levels rather than “attainment of skills” and is based on pre- and post-tests using specific tools

The new measurement period is one year from the date of 1st youth program service

slide90
Comparison with YY Skill Attainment:

Applies to all out-of-school youth who are basic skills deficient, not just younger youth.

All out-of-school must be assessed, even if they have a diploma or equiv.

Common Measure Changes

In-school youth and youth who are not basic skills deficient are excluded.

slide91
Basic Skills Deficient

The individual computes or solves problems, reads, writes or speaks English at or below the eighth grade level or is unable to compute or solve problems, read, write or speak English at a level necessary to function on the job, in the individual’s family or in society

States and grantees have the opportunity to come up with their own definition as long as the above language is included.

Literacy and Numeracy Measure

slide92
Key Factors Contributing to a Positive Outcome:

Literacy and Numeracy Measure

Ensure that all out-of-school youth who are basic skills deficient are in a program that provides sufficient academic advancement.

Prevent drop-outs: Participants who exit before completing one year are included in the measure.

Provide supports to help participant remain engaged in educational services and advance one level.

slide93
Key Factors Contributing to a Positive Outcome:

Pre-test at intake or within 60 days following the date of participation.

May use scores from assessments within 6 months of youth program participation.

Ensure timely testing within one year of youth program participation.

Youth with disabilities are provided with reasonable testing accommodations

Literacy and Numeracy Measure

slide94
Key Factors Contributing to a Positive Outcome:

Educational Functioning Level

All Assessment tools must be standardized to the Department of Education’s functioning levels.

Literacy and Numeracy Measure

slide95
What are Educational Functioning Levels?

Literacy and Numeracy Measure

Skills

6

6

Reading

5

5

Writing

Two grade levels

Numeracy

4

4

Speaking

3

3

Listening

2

2

Functional

1

1

Workplace

ABE

ESL

slide96
Calculation Example:

Of out-of-school basic-skills-deficient youth:

68 youth who advance one educational level

100 youth completers + 22 program drop-outs = 122

Performance = 55.7%

Literacy and Numeracy Measure

slide97

Literacy and Numeracy Quiz

Charles is an in-school youthwho read at the High IntermediateBasic Education educational functioning level when he first entered WIA program. Through working with an after-school tutor, Charles was able to improve his reading skills to the Low Adult Secondary Education level in one year.

What is his performance outcome for the Literacy and Numeracy measure?

scenario service considerations and projected outcomes1
Dan is 18. He dropped out of high school two years ago, but got a GED last year. He was employed part-time at a fast-food restaurant, but he lost that job and enrolled in the WIA program. He is interested in a welding program at the community college.

How can you help Dan succeed in performance and in his life?

Scenario: Service Considerations and Projected Outcomes
two program areas to focus attention
Two Program Areas to Focus Attention
  • Literacy Assessment and Instruction
  • In Program Retention
considerations for literacy assessment
Considerations for Literacy Assessment
  • Do youth understand the point and process of testing?
  • Has an effort been made to make the experience as positive as possible? (e.g. test scores shared in positive and helpful ways to assist youth develop goals and make decisions).
  • Are informal assessments used at intake and during instruction to get a fuller picture of learning strengths and challenges?
considerations for literacy assessment1
Considerations for Literacy Assessment
  • Have testing points been determined to monitor progress and needs?
  • Are staff properly trained to administer tests, and interpret and discuss results?
  • Do you access diagnostic testing services for youth with learning challenges?
considerations for literacy instruction
Considerations for Literacy Instruction
  • Are assessment results used to make decisions about instructional design, both for overall program delivery and individual service plans?
  • Are providers knowledgeable about effective strategies for increasing literacy and numeracy skills?
  • Are instruction materials/activities of interest to youth?
  • Are innovative instructional approaches used—functional literacy or project based learning?
focusing on retention continuously
Focusing on Retention Continuously
  • Emphasize retention from day one.
  • Encourage staff to work as a team to keep youth engaged;
  • Set in-program retention goals and routinely assess if and how they are met.
focusing on retention build trusting relationships
Focusing on Retention: Build Trusting Relationships

Build strong relationships with youth:

  • Orientations to emphasize what youth can expect and what is expected of them.
  • Approaches that focus on youth strengths and talents rather than deficits.
  • Activities where youth actively assume responsibility for completing their service plans.
focusing on retention to keep youth engaged
Focusing on Retention To Keep Youth Engaged

Activities, services and incentives to keep youth engaged before and after exit:

  • Short-term, “hands on” work/learning activities that appeal to youth;
  • Group activities that are fun, creative and supportive;
  • Incentives that appeal to youth—gift certificates, gas coupons, trips to amusement parks or sports events;
focusing on retention help people deal with challenges
Focusing on Retention: Help People Deal with Challenges
  • Help with the transition to work or post-secondary education;
  • As youth achieve goals, outline next steps and needed supports;
  • Have an post-exit plan and schedule for routine check-ins.
focusing on retention help youth build skills
Focusing on Retention: Help Youth Build Skills

Provide activities that keep youth engaged and adequately prepare them for jobs you target:

  • Substantive career exploration, job shadowing and internships;
  • Training that simulates work;
  • Computer skills.
remaining questions
Remaining questions?

Carol Clymer [email protected](215) 557-4495

Brandon Roberts [email protected](301) 657-1480

Public/Private Ventures

2000 Market Street

Suite 600Philadelphia, PA  19103

Phone:  215-557-4400www.ppv.org

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